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Roger Stokes

Can a forester flywheel be turned and work properly

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I had my flywheel turned (2001 forester manual) and I compaired the thickness of mine to a new one, and mine must have been turned befor cause now theres about 1/16 of and inch less than a new one. Will this effect the operation of the clutch, clutch arm, throw out bearing, etc? Do I need to go with the new one?

Thanks,

Roger

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As long as the machine shop knows what they're doing you should be fine. Before they proceed they check the specifications and make sure the part is good and has enough material to work with. If not they let you know, "this isn't turnable." Brake rotors/drums have the spec's on them usually, not sure about the flywheels but you could take a cursory glance just for kicks. You could ask a shop to mic it for you if you're curious.

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If you *actually* had it turned then I would question the machine shop as flywheels are not resurfaced in that way. Proper resurfacing of a flywheel is done on a blanchard grinder - usually one made specifically for the purpose of resurfacing flywheels. Brake rotors are often turned but flywheels are usually not as there are setup considerations involved that make it an undesireable method from a labor standpoint amd it is a lot more difficult to obtain a proper surface finish by turning.

 

If it was resurfaced on a proper flywheel grinder then it will probably be fine as Gary mentioned - any good machinist will check the thickness to see if it's within spec.

 

1/16" should be fine. That gives you about 1/8" total disc wear which should be plenty of clutch life. I probably wouldn't use that flywheel again though.

 

If you are concerned about it you could always have the bolt ring ground or turned a bit to compensate. It's not going to hurt anything to take 1/16" off the bolt circle and that operation could easily be done on a lathe as it's not nearly as bothersome from an accuracy standpoint.

 

GD

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Yeah, I should have the bolt ring turned about 1/16, because theres only 1/16 clearence between the bolts and the clutch springs. So as the clutch wears it could get into the bolts. So that 1/16 less in thickness than a new one flywheel wont interfer with the clutch padle or anyother operation?

Thanks

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Is there a reason not to trust the person that did the work? In the future it might be worth finding somewhere competent so you know your machining work is up to par. If you have a close Subaru dealer, asking who does their machine work might be a good start.

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