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ll77

Pulling engine, etc. through the eyes of a noob

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Today was a fun, easy day. I scrubbed the sides of the heads with engine degreaser and a wire brush, then I got bored of cleaning and I took the valves out.

 

Some shots of the heads:

 

Driver's side:

 

100_0649.jpg

 

Passenger's:

 

100_0648.jpg

 

Taking off the valves:

 

The valves

 

Driver's:

 

100_0649-1.jpg

 

Passenger's

 

100_0647-1.jpg

 

This is my valve compressor at work

 

100_0651.jpg

 

Taking off the retainers with a slightly magnetized screwdriver

 

100_0656.jpg

 

Yummy!

 

100_0657.jpg

 

This is how I'll keep them organized

 

100_0659.jpg

 

100_0660.jpg

 

100_0664.jpg

 

Contemplating whether or not to change the valve guides... these are the OEM NOK ones... I only have the Fel-pro kind...

 

100_0668.jpg

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Hey guys, I'm struggling with the valve lash adjusters, I've gotten 2 out, but the others aren't budging. They were pretty stubborn while the head was on, so I waited until now, but it seems it's even more difficult now. I think I messed up.

 

Any suggestions for getting them pulled? Pleeeaase?

Edited by ll77

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Hi guys, I've just been scrubbing, scraping, scrubbing with a scotch pad, razor blade and wd40 and today I think I'm finally finished with the first head... what do you guys think? :brow: There are a lot of low spots.

 

100_0682.jpg

 

100_0683.jpg

 

100_0684.jpg

 

100_0685.jpg

 

100_0686.jpg

 

I can't feel anything in my thumb from all the scrubbing.

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The last few steps are missing:

 

X) Drop EA82 in dumpster

 

Y) Install EJ22 w/adaptor plate and harness.

 

Z) Pass go. Collect $200.

 

GD

 

I want to know where I pick up this $200 you speak of...:popcorn:

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Oh. That's how its supposed to look. Wow. Mine look terrible then haha. Thanks.. I think I'll slink over to the machine shop...

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that threads all about doing it yourself at home. Not that taking it to the machine shop isn't good, but your already attempting the home done method. there way just looks like it will give you a better finish.

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Yeah... I just feel jittery about doing something so important myself... and I don't have any glass... should be getting them back on Monday.:clap: In the meantime, I'll be doing other things, and I'll be sure to post!

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Today, I resealed my oil pump, and replaced my front crank seal.

 

Questions for those who don't like reading my looong posts:

 

This is how I installed my seals, good? Not seated enough? I have no experience with driving seals in, and I want to know if I haven't done a good job...

 

Oil pump:

 

100_0699.jpg

 

100_0700.jpg

 

Front crankshaft seal:

 

100_0703.jpg

 

100_0704.jpg

 

 

also, I used grease to hold the mickey mouse seal onto the pump surface, it should just melt into the oil, right? I noticed the pump pulley spun with more drag, most likely because of the excess grease pressed into the rotor...but a little grease never hurt anything right?

 

 

Ok, on to the job

 

The seals: oil pump seal, oil pump o-ring, oil pump shaft seal

 

100_0690.jpg

 

loosen the nut holding the pulley on, preferably it would have been done with the belts on, but I just wrapped a portion of the belt onto the pulley to hold it still while I broke the nut with a 12 mm wrench.

 

I removed these 5 10 mm bolts holding the oil pump onto the block. They have washers.

 

100_0687.jpg

 

 

 

Then she slides right off. You can also see the inner rotor in the block in this photo, I left it in, but it comes out.

 

100_0688.jpg

 

 

I took off the oil filter at this point, but it doesn't have to come off

 

The seals were actually surprisingly supple, but very flattened

 

100_0689.jpg

 

Take off the nut holding the pulley on and slide the pulley off the rotor/shaft assembly. Mine took some persuading with a prybar, but it came off in the end. Now we can see the shaft seal.

 

100_0691.jpg

 

Slide the shaft out the rear

 

100_0693.jpg

 

pick out the old shaft seal, clean up the surface a bit

 

100_0694.jpg

 

and I used a wooden mallet and my 27mm socket flipped upside down to install the seal

 

100_0698.jpg

 

I didn't want to beat it too hard, but as you can see, the top sits a bit out of the lip. **Is this good enough?**

 

100_0700.jpg

 

Then the pulley and shaft went back on to the pump assy. There is a flat spot that needs to be aligned on the shaft and pulley.

"Hey friends! Great to see you again!"

 

100_0707.jpg

 

Then I replaced the o-ring and mickey mouse gasket. I put grease on the mickey seal to hold it on, because it didn't fit perfectly and kept falling out...***is this a problem? I actually used quite a bit.***

 

100_0711.jpg

 

grease made alignment much easier, and I just bolted the pump right back on.

 

100_0712.jpg

 

Now I need an oil filter.

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Then the front crank seal was leaking, so I picked it out

 

100_0576.jpg

 

100_0702.jpg

 

Drove the new, NOK seal in with a 12 mm deep socket just like MilesFox in his "The Art of Subaru Maintenance" series

 

100_0703.jpg

 

and again, **is this good enough?**

 

100_0704.jpg

 

And wouldn't it be good logic that installing the crank pulley would be forcible enough to seat the seal anyways (rubs chin)?

 

Please, if this is unacceptable let me know, and I will immediately correct anything. I work really slow, I make sure to be very deliberate in my work, and I really want to do this right. I appreciate everyone's input here, thanks so much! :D:D:D

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Slow and deliberate is the way to go...no sense slammn things together in a rush if ya want it to work...right kids?

Your pics are great

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Slide the shaft out the rear

 

:lol: That's what...- nevermind =P

 

Grease should be fine, I've heard of people using all sorts of stuff, vasoline, etc. If it concerns you at all, change your oil after a couple hundred miles.

 

Seals look good.

 

+1 above; no sense in rushing. Do it right the first time. "The lazy man works twice" Spanish Proverb. haha

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yeah, I was gonna say your seals look good too but figured someone with a gazzillion more posts than I should chime in on that...

I used your pics as a reference when asking myself..."wtf IS this hose I'm reattaching" ..

good work...happy fourth..

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:lol: That's what...- nevermind =P

 

Grease should be fine, I've heard of people using all sorts of stuff, vasoline, etc. If it concerns you at all, change your oil after a couple hundred miles.

 

Seals look good.

 

+1 above; no sense in rushing. Do it right the first time. "The lazy man works twice" Spanish Proverb. haha

 

LOL speaking of vasoline...

 

yeah, I was gonna say your seals look good too but figured someone with a gazzillion more posts than I should chime in on that...

I used your pics as a reference when asking myself..."wtf IS this hose I'm reattaching" ..

good work...happy fourth..

 

Great to know that this post is of service to people here! Thanks, my fourth was pretty productive!

 

I got lazy about posting the past few days, besides it's been slow, with some cleaning, brushing, scraping in between some fun, easy jobs.

 

I took Ivans Imports advice

 

 

while you have cam caiers apart take the plunger that has the sping behind it and stretch the sping about a 1/4 to increse the oil preshure its in the top part of cam caier is a 14 mm bolt that holds the oil tube on do thiss to both sides

 

Remove the bolt holding the oil pipe, underneath is the spring. I observed that there was no tension in the spring, as the bolt easily threaded back on with no resistance from the spring.

 

100_0713.jpg

 

so I stretched it till it was this long, and put it back in, the bolt should be torqued to 17-20 ft/lbs

 

100_0715.jpg

 

scrubbed the valve covers, cleaned off the RTV (whoever worked on it before was seriously in love with RTV and used it on everything, I know RTV should not be applied to the valve cover gaskets), and let the gaskets groove in their grooves.

 

100_0716.jpg

 

 

the OEM NOK cam seals looked great, no sign of leaks, so I decided not to touch them. Also, those little nubs on the cam face are slippery little things.

 

100_0717.jpg

 

but I did replace the o-ring

 

100_0718.jpg

 

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The heads, resurfaced and looking great! The machine shop I took them to was great, the guy I talked to told me he had owned and autocrossed an xt, and told me that the cracking between the valve holes(?) on the heads eventually led to leaking.. but maybe because he was autocrossing it. I told him I would to try resurfacing anyway.

 

100_0722.jpg

 

But they were awesome, they removed my broken stud and pulled the valve lash adjusters that I had been struggling with forever, took out all my old valve stem oil seals, and even stamped a couple of "D's' in my drivers side head for me! Great people.

 

I installed my oil seals, first exhaust (outer edges) then intake (inner) with a 12mm socket and a wooden hammer

 

100_0725.jpg

 

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Then I put the valves and springs back on the head, in their appropriate spots

 

slide valve into valve guide, then push it up through the oil seal

 

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put the springs and retainers back on

 

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easy peasy

 

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put the valve lash adjusters back in the head, the ones that can be pushed down easily should be submerged in oil and pumped a few times before installation.

 

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don't forget to replace the exhaust manifold gaskets

 

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and I had a water pipe o-ring too.

 

100_0739.jpg

 

 

 

Still waiting on cam case o-rings and new intake manifold bolts..

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the cracking between the valves was always explained as commonplace to me. though eventually it can crack too deep or crack through the valve seat and cause problems.

 

My old XT turbo finally died from them, the crack hit a water jacket and was letting coolant into the exhaust. the mechanic I have always gone too says that they pretty much all have them, just remember that they can go too deep and cause problems so watch your heat.

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the cracking between the valves was always explained as commonplace to me. though eventually it can crack too deep or crack through the valve seat and cause problems.

 

My old XT turbo finally died from them, the crack hit a water jacket and was letting coolant into the exhaust. the mechanic I have always gone too says that they pretty much all have them, just remember that they can go too deep and cause problems so watch your heat.

 

Thanks, I'll keep my eye on it.

 

Today, I saw this (water pump where water pipe goes in):

 

100_0762.jpg

 

My God, I don't think I did that.. how bad is this? Will it leak? I really hope I don't need a new water pump!

 

 

 

Today I fetched my cam case o rings and intake manifold bolts

 

100_0743.jpg

 

this is the block, clean as I could get it with a razor blade

 

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fit the head gasket on, lubed the bolts a bit

 

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here's the torquing diagram from the FSM

 

100_0753.jpg

 

torquing should be done in 3 steps,

1st: torque all of them to 22 ft/lbs

2nd: torque to 43 ft/lbs

3rd: torque to 47 ft/lbs

I should also mention, I'm using those Felpro Permatorque gaskets.

 

100_0761.jpg

 

arrrgghhhh! Maybe I should slap some RTV in there?

Edited by ll77

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^ I'm not even sure what we're looking at there, but I don't remember a new water being time consuming nor all that expensive...

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That inner lip of the water pump, where the water pipe meets it, is cracked. Sorry the photos are so bad.

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I think you should get rid of any bits of metal that are left in that lip that could come off and wind up in your cooling system.

 

I also think you should just replace the pump, as you're going through the engine and a water-pump is relatively cheap to have on there new, but if you don't want to do that you can always use that one, get your build together, fire it up and see if it leaks.

 

If it does, it's not that hard to replace; I mean you've torn the whole engine apart now lol, what's the big deal if you have to swap in a new waterpump after your done

 

Sucks that happened though, don't get me wrong.

Good luck!

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Yeah, it doesn't look very hard at all.. maybe I'll just go ahead and order it... I hate having to wait for parts to come in though. I don't see any metal bits, I thought the same thing when I saw it, but I guess they're lost now. Sucks...

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That inner lip of the water pump, where the water pipe meets it, is cracked. Sorry the photos are so bad.

 

dude, your pics are nothing short of spectacular..seriously...

It's obvious it's the water pump port, I'm just not yet familiar enough to pick up on the issue you wanted to point out....nothing to do with your pic's quality....I replaced my pump simply because I was there...well, that and 161,000 miles..

yes, def go for the new pump....how many miles on that engine anyway? sorry if I missed that in an earlier post..

keep pluggn away

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hey..i didn't throw my old pump away and just looked into the same port...i'm pretty sure that what you think is sheared off is just a rough cast or rough machining...mine looks extremely similar and I'm certain it's not a flaw....

There's similar casting differences in an oil return port on the block...even yours (pretty sure there's a pic back there) is different from the two others compared in a recent thread..

 

that said, you should prob change the water pump since you're there..and when will you want to be there again??

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dude, your pics are nothing short of spectacular..seriously...

It's obvious it's the water pump port, I'm just not yet familiar enough to pick up on the issue you wanted to point out....nothing to do with your pic's quality....I replaced my pump simply because I was there...well, that and 161,000 miles..

yes, def go for the new pump....how many miles on that engine anyway? sorry if I missed that in an earlier post..

keep pluggn away

 

Haha such flattery. Thank you friend. I am not completely sure, but the guy I bought it off said there were ~120k miles on the engine he got from the junkyard, the original one had overheated.

 

Yeah, I think I will change the pump, it's just waiting for the part that's the hardest part really, I wish I'd have ordered one in the first place, but now there's a really cheap NOS Paraut pump on ebay that I'll have to wait 6 days just to bid on..

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I got the guy with the Paraut pump to end his auction, and it's shipping tomorrow! Yes!

 

I got my cam cases on

 

I positioned the both cams so that upon installation the cam pins would point up like so

 

100_0811.jpg

 

at first I used grease to hold the rocker arms on

 

100_0765.jpg

 

then I realized I needed to reposition the engine because the tire was in the way:-p

 

 

Then the engine was tilted too much and the grease wouldnt hold so I used zipties

 

100_0766.jpg

 

Make sure the grooves for sealant in the cam case are clean! I had to scrape the RTV out at the last minute because it slipped my mind

 

100_0768.jpg

 

I used Permatex anaerobic gasket maker, jabbed the tube with scissors and it squeezed oh so slowly... I didn't do the greatest job of getting a single good bead on there.. but this anaerobic stuff is top-shelf shizzle anyways right?

 

EDIT: also note the cam case o ring in the bottom right of the cam case in the pic. put that on with a bit of motor oil

 

100_0776.jpg

 

Fit it on the head, install bolts loosely and snip and pull all the zipties

 

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100_0779.jpg

 

 

give all the bolts 14 ft/lbs, wipe the excess gunk off, do the other side

 

100_0786.jpg

 

 

 

Then I sprayed some copper sealant on my intake manifold gaskets and positioned it on, only to find that one of the bolts couldn't get through the manifold.. it was blocked by a piece of rust that I had to knock through with an old bolt... the manifold shedded all kinds of rust all over the coppered gasket, so I just sprayed more on, to the point where I got a bit of orange peel! I know that's probably more than I was supposed to put on, but...

 

100_0790.jpg

 

100_0792.jpg

 

then I oiled the threads of the bolts and torqued them with 16 ft./lbs

 

also, now would be a good time to install the fuel line bracket onto the manifold

 

100_0793.jpg

 

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then I tightened the plug for the EGR pipe with 27 ft/lbs

 

100_0794.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

On to the timing belts

 

100_0795.jpg

 

align the flywheel's center timing mark (marked in orange) to the pointer on the flywheel housing

 

100_0788.jpg

Edited by ll77

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I had new tensioners, so I unbolted them and took them off the springs

 

Driver's

 

100_0796.jpg

 

100_0797.jpg

 

Passenger's

 

100_0798.jpg

 

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Old vs New

 

100_0800.jpg

 

The old ones made a considerable amount of noise and spun very freely. The new ones are much quieter and tighter.

 

I installed them in their slackened positions, then I began to fit the driver's side belt on (the longer one)

 

I slipped it under the tensioner, then over the crank pulley to the crank sprocket, then under the oil pump pulley, then under the idler pulley, then fit it onto the cam sprocket from underneath. Belt tension is important underneath the cam pulley for this belt.

 

100_0801-1.jpg

 

I didn't have a spanner, and I just put firm counterclockwise pressure with my hand and pushed the tensioner down a bit while my dad tightened the tensioner bolts (14 ft/lbs). Tighten the pivoting bolt on the tensioner last.

 

This part is important: crank the crank pulley clockwise a full 360 degrees, so that the driver's cam pulley is pointing down like this:

 

100_0802.jpg

 

100_0808.jpg

 

the center timing mark should be aligned with the flywheel housing pointer, as it was before

 

The short belt is easy, just slip it over the crank sprocket and fit it to the top of the cam pulley, keeping tension on the top portion of the belt. I got the pops to tighten like before, I applied counterclockwise pressure and pushed up on the tensioner.

 

right now we look like this:

 

driver's

 

100_0802.jpg

 

passengers:

 

100_0805.jpg

 

flywheel

 

100_0788.jpg

 

I torqued down my cam pulley bolts (7 ft/lbs) and oil pump pulley nut (12 ft/lbs) at this point

 

 

Then I put my valve covers back on. looking more like an engine now!

 

100_0812.jpg

 

Then the distributor went on. Had to fiddle with this for a while.

 

Crank the crank pulley clockwise until the pointer of the flywheel housing is aligned with "0." here's the FSM:

 

100_0820.jpg

 

Align the indentation with the bump on the distributor

 

100_0816.jpg

 

Then it goes right in. I didn't just slam it in there like a barbarian though, it turns when it meets with the cam gear, so it kept sliding back.

 

I had the marks perfectly aligned, and this is what I got the first time. Not what we want!

 

100_0813.jpg

 

This is what we want

 

100_0817.jpg

 

The rotor should be pointing at the #1 spark plug position when it is all the way in. I slid it in a bit off clockwise so that it would fall into the right position, if that makes sense. Fiddling will get you there sooner or later.

 

Then put the mounting bolts back in, and the timing is all done for now. I might take my timing light to it when it's all together again.

Edited by ll77

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