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burton302

Pay recommendations?

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Hello all!

 

I am new member so I hope this is the right forum for this topic. I am a subaru dealer non-union mechanic. I will be training an apprentice next month. I have never been in that kind of situation and neither has my dealership. Management is looking for my input on how I should be compensated. Are any of you familiar with this and if so what should I ask for/expect? Thanks.

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Entry level typically starts out on the clock, and is paid by the hour.

 

So Id investigate local hourly wages in your area. Everywhere is different.

 

Dont be surprised when you find out just low low it is.

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you mean training a union apprentice? or just someone your company hired?

 

Generally unions in my area are required to have X amount of journeyman per apprentice at a location. If the union wants to use you to train an apprentice, i would at least ask for base union journeyman wage or higher.

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I used the word "apprentice" loosely. I work in a non-union shop. This person was originally hired as an hourly lube tech who is now a flat-rate mechanic in training. One idea I have heard were that I would be paid a percentage of the work that he would turn out. I have no idea what that percentage should be or even if that is a good or bad plan. I am not sure what average salaries are in down state Illinois, however I think that I am one of the higher paid techs at my dealership at $19/hour.

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Figure out how much he will slow you down and complicate your work and ask to be compensated for that plus a bit more as incentive to even take on this additional responsibility and risk.

 

That's how I would pitch it and how I would ask to be compensated. If he slows you down by 25% then ask for an additional 25% of your hourly rate for every job completed as well as a base hourly rate increase commensurate with your new responsibilities and possibly a new title that also reflects your status in the shop.

 

GD

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I hate jobs like this :-\

He will be your responsibility and you will have to watch him like a hawk.

Because if he screws up he's not the only one getting shafted. Your going to lose money on this deal, no matter what comp you get from it.

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I have been on both sides of it and when in training I proved myself in a week and went to full technician. I felt for the guy supervising me but I was teaching him as much as he was me so you could be okay. It all depends on who you get and how smart they are with a wrench and the customers. When I had someone working with me, I actually made more money than I did without. It can certainly go both ways.

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I'm expected to train people at much less than that.

 

 

 

 

You are expected to train someone at $19 an hour?

 

Im sorry.... :-\

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Hi there,

I'm new to the board, but was a Tech for 40 years with the last 34 with M-Benz & NEVER worked in a Union shop. I was very often "asked" to train new hires whether they had had VoTech training or not. These newbies were placed with me for a period of time that was dependant on my input to management and their observations. They were usually given a lift next to mine, but not always. Sometimes he (never had a female trainee) would have to work with me on my lift. When we had to share a lift my hours were averaged & "guaranteed", but usually they were working next to me & I got whatever hours they produced. Of course, I was responsible for all of their work so the time needed to supervise them was offset by the hours they produced. I usually would not allow them to use any impact tools except for removing wheels lugs & a torque wrench became their friend. As they improved, so did my paycheck. Eventually the party would come to an end & they would have to go "on the line".

I usually found it to be a profitable & rewarding proposition (for all), but a difficult one at times because of language, personalities, etc. I had the opportunity of trying to influence new Techs into focusing on the quality of their work rather than just the $$. My philosophy has been to do the best work you can & the $$ will follow and it served me quite well until I retired 2 years ago.

I'm am sorry to see that you're only making $19/hr in this day & age:mad:.

Chris

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