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Loyale93v

Retired: Subaru Loyale ...maybe

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Greetings everyone. I am seriously considering retiring the 1993 Subaru Loyale 1.8L EA82.

She still runs good. I just need to update.

I am thinking of Parting it out and then it's off to the salvage yard.

This is a EA82 1.8L Auto Trans(I want to say it's a 3 speed trans))with 137,595 on the clock.

Timing Belt/Water Pump was done at 75,000(so it is due.)

The engine needs to be re-sealed. It has a some oil seepage near cams.

 

Anyways , it has been acting up lately....sputtering a little and seems to have power loss when going up hills or under load.

I tried to check for DTC codes this morning by connecting first the green and then the white diagnostic connectors under hood near fuel filter.

the red light on the ECU started to flash: 7-7-7

then with the other diag connector plugged in the light flashes 13 & 11.

(I think that is what I read, long flashes for ten's and short flashes for one's...correct?)

I don't know what all 7's could mean.....?

 

Any how , If these codes are accurate & current I think it has something to do with the Crank Position Sensor.

Which may explain some power loss. I was wondering if a worn Timing Belt(s) could cause these codes to be triggered in the ECU?

 

If anyone has any feedback for me it will be greatly appreciated.

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137,000 would probably be the lowest mileage subaru in the wrecking yard. If it has no significant body damage and you have not let it set out in the sun for 19 years, it would ordinarily be a mistake to part your car out.

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First-Change plugs, rotor cap, rotor, plug wires and check timing. This may solve your immediate problems. Plug wires often corrode inside of the cap or at the plug. How does it run now?

Second- Remove coil wire to distributor. Set timing mark on the center of 3 marks on the flywheel and insert screw driver in flywheel hole to keep it from spinning.

Third- remove alternator, fan blades, radiator fluid, radiator, side timing belt covers.

Fourth-Note location of timing holes now visible on the camshaft/timing belt geared pulleys. One should be straight up and the other straight down. The straight up hole aligns with a notch in the rear timing belt cover. Put mark of whiteout paint on the hole straight down pulley, that aligns with the top notch in the rear timing belts cover.

Fifth-Remove center inertia pulley, center timing belt cover, timing belts, water pump, camshaft/timing belt geared pulleys and front support for the camshaft that is immediately behind the geared pulley.

6th- Replace the 2 large O-rings on each front camshaft support. Replace camshaft support.

7th-Replace w/ new water pump, 2 seals and attaching hoses and pipe. Install gasket sealer in top hole on water pump and let dry prior to replacing.

8th- Remove and replace all 3 timing belts pulleys with new.

9th- Replace camshaft/timing belts geared pulleys

10th- Without moving the flywheel from it's original set position, replace rear most new timing belt and carefully realign camshaft geared pulley where you initially found it aligning with a rear cover notch.

11th- Tighten first timing belt by tightening the spring loaded pulleys that you just replaced

12th-Replace front most new timing belt and carefully realign camshaft geared pulley where you initially found it aligning opposite to the first geared pulley. Do not move the other timing belt or it's geared camshaft pulley.

13th- Tighten second timing belt by tightening the spring loaded pulleys that you just replaced

14th- Replace all front timing belt covers, center inertia pulley, radiator, fan blades, alternator, radiator fluid, in that order.

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It's not in bad shape persay...it could use some tires...maybe some suspension (struts & such)

Yeah I agree with the post that instructs to R & R Timing belt and related components.

I have done it once before. I think what is leaking oil is the "valve box" what I mean by that is,...valve cover gskt, then cam box(its what I call it) then head gskt. It could just be cam seals though...or both!

how many hours is the whole job? cam seals and all?

...good break down of the job, by the way.

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how many hours is the whole job? cam seals and all?

...good break down of the job, by the way.

 

2 hours to disassemble

3 hours to reassemble

Add 2 hours if you do the cam tower cover gaskets

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I tried to check for DTC codes this morning by connecting first the green and then the white diagnostic connectors under hood near fuel filter.

the red light on the ECU started to flash: 7-7-7

then with the other diag connector plugged in the light flashes 13 & 11.

(I think that is what I read, long flashes for ten's and short flashes for one's...correct?)

I don't know what all 7's could mean.....?

 

Any how , If these codes are accurate & current I think it has something to do with the Crank Position Sensor.

Which may explain some power loss. I was wondering if a worn Timing Belt(s) could cause these codes to be triggered in the ECU?

.

 

 

Code 7 is a model designation- SPFI, 49-state, Auto trans. This means no stored codes. (white connectors)

 

Codes 11 and 13 are for Cam and Crank sensor (same sensor in EA82;) )

These generate when you use the green connectors, key on-eng. off. Since the engine isn't spinning, ECU thinks there is no signal from disty. These are known as "ghost codes" that come up often during testing.

 

If the car runs....there is no problem with the sensor(s)

 

 

I'd say change your Plugs, Wires, Cap, and Rotor.

 

Loose timing belt will not throw a code....although it can lead to running a little rough...but not big loss of power.

 

If it's sputtery, and slugish probably Plugs, cap, etc.....

 

Although a new fuel filter and a bottle of injector cleaner wouldn't hurt.

 

137k is pretty low miles.

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Yesterday subaru stopped running. Sister went out to start it and it's a "crank, no start"

Removed timing belt covers today. Discovered that left side belt(the inner timing belt) is off about two teeth. I rotated crankshaft pulley clock wise until right side cam belt was at twelve o'clock. At this point the left cam belt should be at the six o'clock position, correct? -Well, it isn't.

 

I can not decide what the timing mark is on crankshaft sprocket.

 

The left cam belt is also showing signs of wear; cracking and loose.

There appears to be some fragments of the belt stuck to block and timing cover.(only way to describe is its a black FUZZY type of debris). The cam seals or the cambox-to-Cylinderhead gaskets are leaking pretty good...likely causing the belt failure and sticky , fuzzy belt debris.

 

So I am off to parts store to get the belts and related components.

Looks like I should just take earlier advice and replace everything.

I am taking some pics with my phone. I will try to figure how to post them here so you guys can have a look and decide for yourselves.

Edited by Loyale93v

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Whenever I do EA82 timming belts/cam seals, I totally remove everything from the front of the car. (grill, radiator, ect) Makes it alot easier to see everything when lining everything up.

 

If you decide to part out your car drop me an email. I can always use extra ea82 parts.

 

I live in southern new england.

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Whenever I do EA82 timming belts/cam seals, I totally remove everything from the front of the car. (grill, radiator, ect) Makes it alot easier to see everything when lining everything up.

 

If you decide to part out your car drop me an email. I can always use extra ea82 parts.

 

I live in southern new england.

 

I agree with this. I have gotten down to 20min to replace EA82 timing belts (if the covers are already removed)

 

One thing to make sure of is, if you do replace the belts, leave all the covers off. They will take a 1 hour job down to 20min, as you don't have to remove the crank pulley, or belts in the future. Plus you can inspect the belt every time you check the oil, it also makes adjusting the tension much easier.

 

Keep the old girl going!

 

-Tom :popcorn:

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Once you get that timing belt changed, check for vacuum leaks by spraying brake cleaner at the small rubber hoses around the intake. Especially the joints and where they slide onto nipples and such. I had a '93 Loyale that ran like CRAP even after doing a tune-up, timing belts etc and it turned out to be a broken vacuum hose.

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Once you get that timing belt changed, check for vacuum leaks by spraying brake cleaner at the small rubber hoses around the intake. Especially the joints and where they slide onto nipples and such. I had a '93 Loyale that ran like CRAP even after doing a tune-up, timing belts etc and it turned out to be a broken vacuum hose.

 

I think I may need to do this myself. Why brake cleaner?

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