Jump to content
Ultimate Subaru Message Board

Recommended Posts

Hi all,
I've been replacing my clutch and transmission box on my '99 Outback. But the transmission (both new and old ones) will not slap up against the engine!

I've read everything there is to read about re-installing the MT on these OBs, and I've tried everything imaginable with NO RESULTS! See photo links below of input shaft, clutch plate and hole, and the gap that exists between the transmission and the engine.

Before you ask, here's what I know:
1. There's nothing blocking the tranny from hitting the engine anywhere.
2. The transmission is definitely the right size. Even the original won't shove back into it's place.
3. I have rotated the input shaft splines 10+ times and tried to shove it in, still won't go.
4. The transmission gets on all bolts, but not all the way up against the engine.
5. The clutch fork and bearing are all installed correctly and not interfering.
6. I have tried getting under the tranny and wiggling it up and down, left to right, a hundred times. No dice.
7. I have re-installed the clutch plate and disc three times, making sure it's facing the correct direction and aligned properly.
8. One of the lower bolts may be slightly bent, but the transmission still goes on all six bolts just fine. And if that one bolt is indeed bent, it's only a very slight, minute bend.

Anyone have any ideas on how to finally get this sucker on without breaking anything? I am losing my mind.

 

Here's the photo of the tranny and engine:

 

tranny-engine.JPG

 

Photo of input shaft:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-k3F3pybq0P...nput+shaft.JPG

Photo of clutch:
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0ElioWP9To...lutch+hole.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I had similar issues it was that the trans input splines and clutch were not lining up.  It sounds like you've tried rotating the shafts so they line up, so not sure that's the issue...even though it sounds like it.

 

Out of curiousity have you tried putting the clutch on the trans input shaft when the trans is not installed?  My thinking is just to verify that the clutch actually will slide over the input shaft splines.

 

If you try rotating the engine, and the trans is in gear, do the cv axles/wheels turn at all?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I'm wondering if it's the splines still somehow. But I've rotated them so much that it just seems like that can't be the problem. And I have put the clutch on the input shaft to make sure the splines line up. They lined up pretty easily.

 

When you say "rotate the engine", do you mean rotating the pulley wheel on the oppositie side of the engine from the transmission? I tried rotating that pulley with the hopes that it would rotate the clutch splines; easier than me having to pull the tranny off, rotate the shaft, and try pushing it back in. You know what I mean?

Regardless, that didn't seem to work the couple times I tried it. So I assumed rotating that pulley only rotated the flywheel and didn't rotate the splines. If that pulley rotates the flywheel, is it also supposed to rotate the clutch splines?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The plastic clutch alignment tools suck. They are sloppy so if you don't wiggle them around and then hold them in the centered position while you snug up the pressure plate bolts the clutch disk ends up off center. Then when you try to put the transmission in, the shaft won't go into the pilot bearing.

 

Try re-centering the disk.

 

You can also leave the pressure plate bolts loose. Tighten them just enough so the disk starts to be grabbed, then tighten them through the starter hole once the transmission is on. You'll have to turn the engine a bunch of times to tighten the bolts down in a criss cross pattern evenly, but it will work in a pinch.

 

I cut the input shaft off a junk transmission I had and use that as my alignment tool. The transmissions slip right in.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

+1 for what Woodswagon is saying.  

 

the plastic tool should be thrown in the garbage.  If you have access to any junk 5mt's cut the input shaft off and use that as the alignment tool

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Make certain you don't have more alignment pins than you need. When you separate engine and tranny sometimes the pins stay with the engine, sometimes they stay with the tranny. If installing a different tranny, it can be a problem. It's easy to over look.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if you have gotten it back in or not. Do you have the transmission lifted off the front subframe a couple inches? If not it sounds like the engine mount bolts are hitting the subframe which would cause about a 2 inch gap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if you have gotten it back in or not. Do you have the transmission lifted off the front subframe a couple inches? If not it sounds like the engine mount bolts are hitting the subframe which would cause about a 2 inch gap.

That happened to me after I did my head gasket repair, I jumped up on the engine and shook the motor side to side and it popped on flush to the transmission.. then the engine mounts went down in the slots for them.

Edited by 1-3-2-4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was changing the clutch in a Nissan, the disc had flywheel side stamped on it, so I put it in with that side facing the flywheel. Many put ins and pull outs and take aparts later, I measured things using a straightedge and protrusion guage.

 

Since I looked at the new parts before taking it all apart, and saw the clearly marked flywheel side, I didnt pay attention to which side was out on the disc when I took it apart.

 

The measuring showed the disc was bottoming on the trans-shaft. Turned the clutch disc so the side marked flywheel was facing the pressure plate, and it all went together and worked.

 

Dohhh....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a sheetmetal plate attached to the bottom of engine, accross the area under the flywheel.  Make sure that plate isn't being bent and caught between the engine and trans.

 

Helps to wedge a block of 2x4 between the alt and the radiator top to angle the engine "back" towards the trans.

 

loosen the flywheel mounting bolts a bit, then tighten them after installing engine to trans.  Access them through the starter hole.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gloyale means the pressure plate bolts, not the flywheel bolts.   Cant really get the flywheel bolts after the trannys in :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a sheetmetal plate attached to the bottom of engine, accross the area under the flywheel.  Make sure that plate isn't being bent and caught between the engine and trans.

 

Helps to wedge a block of 2x4 between the alt and the radiator top to angle the engine "back" towards the trans.

 

loosen the flywheel mounting bolts a bit, then tighten them after installing engine to trans.  Access them through the starter hole.

 

Oops  yeah, i meant pressure plate bolts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×