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How hard is a CV boot replacement?

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I need a new front right inner boot.  From the Chilton manual, it looks like it's not to hard to remove the shaft with the exception of pulling the hub off.  It recommends a special too for hub removal.

 

Overall, how tough is this job and can I use a gear puller or hydraulic press to remove the hub instead of the special too?

 

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easy peasy.. take you less than an hr with no odd tools. a 14mm wrench or socket, a 17mm a 36mm for the axle nut and some pliers for the cotter pin.

 

to get the axle out of the knuckle just put a peice of wood between the threads and a good size hammer. it should come right out.

 

to get the axle back through the spindle feed it through till you can get the nut back on then use a couple flat head screw drivers to pry it through till you can get the hub on and then tighten it to pull it through the rest of the way..

 

 

also dont bother removing the brakes, instead just remove the 4 14mm bolts that hold the hub to the rotor. and remove the hub.

 

 

 this should help. Edited by AKghandi

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There is drift pin thru the axle at the transaxle stub. 3/16" punch works well. You may have to 'modify' the punch to make sure you can get a hammer on it. Then make sure the punch is long enough to get the pin thru the stub shaft. I leave the pin sticking out the other side of the axle... ie., don't drive it all the way thru.

If you follow the manual, you should be ok. Although, when I reboot my axle, usually within a few weeks of buying the Subie, I replace the tie rod end, ball joint, wheel bearings, turn rotors and new brake pads. Depends on whether you have the service records and how many miles. But I plan on keeping the cars (6 so far) forever.

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it's basically easy, have a TON of rags/towels ready it's really messy.  if you just plan on using a dozen rags/shop towels it's easy.

 

the pin in the axle only goes one way when reinstalling if you look at the splines on the axle before you crawl under there you'll see one has a valley through the center and the other has a peak through the center.  so it only installs one way.

 

rust can make it an issue getting it apart, but other than that it's not bad.

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To replace the boot itself, is it easy enough to disassemble the CV joint, or should I use one of those quick boot things that wraps around the joint?

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To replace the boot itself, is it easy enough to disassemble the CV joint, or should I use one of those quick boot things that wraps around the joint?

no, replacing the boot is easy, theres a ring on the inside of the cup, right near the edge really easy to get out. then theres the c clip that holds the ball and cage assembly to the shaft. it can be kinda tricky if you dont have c clip pliers. but you should be able to get it with a flat head screw driver.

 

instead of using traditional boot clamps, alot of people use heavy duty zipties. its alot easier just pull them tight then grab the tag end right next to the latch with a pair of needle nose pliers, and turn till it locks in tight then trim.

 

http://www.harborfreight.com/24-inch-heavy-duty-cable-ties-10-pack-66487.html like these

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You guys are making this way to tough.OP doesn't need to replace axle just reboot the inner end.

*Jack up car so front wheels are off the ground,put jackstands under rocker panels behind front tires

*use 3/16 pin punch+hammer to knock out roll pin near the transmission of the CV-always hammer out the roll pin from the DIVOT on the Cv axle cup

*If CV axle will slid on splined shaft from transmission,skip to next step.If not cuss at it,hit it with a hammer,spray penetrating fluid on the splines,heat the axle cup with a torch,repeat until CV axles cup moves freely on splines.

*Turn steering wheel to full lock,If lucky there will be enough room to slide CV axles off splines,If not remove the bolt/nut that hold the lower control arm to the crossmember.

*Tear rest of CV boot,and wipe out grease with rag/shop towels,old t shirt.Once clean you will see a circlip in the inner lip of the CV axle cup.Use a screw driver to remove clip.Cv axle cup should come free.

*remove remainder of CV boot from axle and CV cup.

*remove circlip that holds CV balls/retainer to axle shaft

*install boot onto shaft,reinstall CV balls/retainer +circlip,Install axle shaft into CV cup,reinstall circlip that locks the CV cup to the shaft,fill the boot with grease,install boot on CV cup,use whatever to hole CV boot to various parts

*Installation is reverse of removal. 

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You guys are making this way to tough.OP doesn't need to replace axle just reboot the inner end.

*Jack up car so front wheels are off the ground,put jackstands under rocker panels behind front tires

*use 3/16 pin punch+hammer to knock out roll pin near the transmission of the CV-always hammer out the roll pin from the DIVOT on the Cv axle cup

*If CV axle will slid on splined shaft from transmission,skip to next step.If not cuss at it,hit it with a hammer,spray penetrating fluid on the splines,heat the axle cup with a torch,repeat until CV axles cup moves freely on splines.

*Turn steering wheel to full lock,If lucky there will be enough room to slide CV axles off splines,If not remove the bolt/nut that hold the lower control arm to the crossmember.

*Tear rest of CV boot,and wipe out grease with rag/shop towels,old t shirt.Once clean you will see a circlip in the inner lip of the CV axle cup.Use a screw driver to remove clip.Cv axle cup should come free.

*remove remainder of CV boot from axle and CV cup.

*remove circlip that holds CV balls/retainer to axle shaft

*install boot onto shaft,reinstall CV balls/retainer +circlip,Install axle shaft into CV cup,reinstall circlip that locks the CV cup to the shaft,fill the boot with grease,install boot on CV cup,use whatever to hole CV boot to various parts

*Installation is reverse of removal. 

 

It sounds like you are suggesting I replace the boot without fully removing the shaft from the car.  Is it easy enough to do it this way or is it worth the time to fully remove it?

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follow the videos.  I would only try rebooting after removing the axle.  I believe he intended you to remove the axle but was offering an alternative procedure.

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A full replacement axle with both slip joints nicely packed with fresh bearings and a couple of new boots only goes for about $50 on rockauto.com. Things probably aren't super clean inside your CV joint by now if you've been procrastinating on this job at all.

 

 

That said, winter before last I drove around for several months with a piece of leather shop apron zap strapped in place of the torn boot while I was waiting for the weather to warm up.

Edited by splazo
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It's been a few years since I've swapped a CVA. With that said, my driver side front is starting to knock and... it really isn't the biggest deal. The tools are typical. No need for a hub remover or what have you. It slides neatly into the tranny, and connects easily to the hub. Safely lift the car, disconnect it from the hub side, then pull 'er out. Difficulty - "Some Experience Required"

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Alright, the shaft is back in.  Overall: this was a pretty simple job, but next time I would Newbie's advice and just order a new shaft.  New boots from NAPA were $38.  A new shaft from RockAuto delivered would have been $55.  Shafts are a lot cheaper than they used to be.

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I think Eric the Car Guy in the video above is totally wrong. A cheap split-boot and some fresh grease costs less than £5, requires no disassembly and will increase the life of a worn joint hugely. If you use your car for work off road (as I used to do) I might replace the boots several times a year due to damage. The modern glues supplied with a split boot are really good and work very well. He also assumes that drive shafts (as we call them here) are cheap and plentiful. Not so in many many places around the world. I also think that 'waste-not-want-not' is a better policy financially and environmentally. I very much liked the vid from Miles though - I do that job in exactly the same way. The only things I'd add would be to (A) clean any parts you're working on before you take them off, clean them again when they're off and give them a coat of paint. I'd also take the opportunity to heck the bearings (have a new oil seal handy) and add some grease to the bearings before putting the drive shaft back into the hub.

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The NAPA price of $38 seems way high.  I definitely agree with  NickNaCorn, check prices before you buy.  Eric the CarGuy is generally correct, but I was also able to get a new boot kit for my Loyale from CostLess auto for $6 which included the band and grease.  Eric's videos are still quite helpful though.

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