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I am pretty sure I need new spark plugs at least this has been reccommended by the last shop I was at.

 

Is this something a car repair NOVICE can handle.  I drive a 2005 subaru outback 2.5l.  It has 134000 miles on it.  I haven't looked into this very much yet but kinda thinkg it wouln'd be too difficult. I did replace a power sterring belt or something a couple of yearrs ago. I think I killed my alternator because I didn't have a torque wrench.   Would this be easy enough?

 

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Unsure how you'd kill an alternator due to no torque wrench.

 

I've done plugs on a 2005(maybe 2006) Impreza 2.5 SOHC.

 

Mostly the usual deal.  Patience.  A lot of wierd common tools.  I usually use a spark plug socket with a swivel built in.  I believe I usually also use the shortest extension (a Snapon like maybe 1"), various combinations.

 

Don't be afraid to use a way long extension to actually ge tthe ratchet out of the engine bay,

 

SOmetimes washer bottle removal helps.

 

FYI IMO those plugs will run well past the interval. But when built there is no anti-seize used.  SO use some ont eh new ones, I also use dielectric grease on the plugs/wires.

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Just wondering if I will save much $$ or anything else by doing it on my own or if going on my own will lead to alots of time and frustration.  Heck I don't even know how much spark plugs cost or what the right type would be.

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The way I see it, finding out the cost of spark plugs is fairly easy. Finding the right type is pretty easy. Heck, getting them out is pretty easy, once you figure out just the right combination of swivels, extensions, and wobbly sockets.

 

Me, I'm scared to death of cross threading 'em when I put them in. That could end up being a PITA to deal with. So the next time I do plugs (I'm due for 'em in my Baja, so that'll be soon), I figure I'm going to try a trick I read about somewhere on here:

 

Mark the depth of the socket assembly when the spark plug is fully installed, so I know how far the new plug should sit once it's in there. Then when I'm installing the new one, I plan on slipping a bit of surgical tubing over the terminal end of the plug, giving me just enough friction to get the plug started properly, but not enough to let me cross thread it.

 

So goes the idea, at least.

Edited by the_bard

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I am pretty sure I need new spark plugs at least this has been reccommended by the last shop I was at.

 

Is this something a car repair NOVICE can handle.  I drive a 2005 subaru outback 2.5l.  It has 134000 miles on it.  I haven't looked into this very much yet but kinda thinkg it wouln'd be too difficult. I did replace a power sterring belt or something a couple of yearrs ago. I think I killed my alternator because I didn't have a torque wrench.   Would this be easy enough?

 

I actually made a video when I did the plugs on my 05 outback recently. Have a look and see if you want to dive into the job or not. It's not really a nasty job, just a bit silly. Don't be in a hurry.

 

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Super easy. Pull the intake tube/airbox, and battery. Easy access to all 4 with basic hand tools. I do it in about 20 minutes, novice shouldn't take more than an hour.

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owners manual should give you the correct type of spark plug to use - these cars like the NGK products. Cost - should be less than $2 each - no more than $3...

 

Having a shop do this - labor is the big factor here - labor charges vary depending on where you live - around me it is typically around $45-55 per hour, but some have reported as high as $85 per hour, or more - usually in the larger cities...so yeah, you could easily save money doing it yourself (if you have tools) - plus, you get the satisfaction of having done it.

 

Changing spark plugs is not all that difficult, per se - but can be a little time consuming for a first timer.

 

Drivers side is usually the harder side - more things in the way - making it a bit awkward to get in there, but not impossible. 

 

The biggest issue with the aluminum blocks is to make sure you dont cross thread when installing the new plugs. A little trick that I use is turn the new plug backwards (as if taking it out) until I feel it "pop" into the threads, then turn in - I do this by hand...put new plug into the plug socket (with a short extension attached for holding on to), insert in the hole, and thread in...it should go fairly easily - if there is resistance, stop, back it out, and try again.

 

Once it is threaded in by hand as far as you can, attach the ratchet and snug it down - do not overtighten! you only need to "snug" it - about a half turn after it 'hits bottom'

 

In all seriousness - I am only about 3 - 3.5 hours away from you (if you really are in Minneapolis) - if you cared to take a little road trip, I would be happy to help you through your first plug change.

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I do plugs wires and valve covers as a set no point if oils going to get on your new plugs and wires

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