Jump to content
Ultimate Subaru Message Board

Recommended Posts

Hi again!

It turned out that I didnt have such a luck I hoped for in my previous thread Impreza 1996 clutch issue. After replacing engine coolant temp sensor and cleaning crankshaft and camshaft position sensors which were covered in oily crap the car acted more spirited but in two weeks it was pain in the butt to keep up even in city speeds. Since estimates for clutch repair job were 70-90% of car purchase price I decided to try it myself.

 

Realized after mounting gantry crane and attaching chain hoist and after that engine leveler that the max raise capacity wouldnt be enough if front of the car is resting on jacks. How much do I need clearance to lift ej20 engine from bay?

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remove the hood for extra clearance, and pull the radiator. I've done a clutch on an XT without ever pulling the engine completely from the car lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hood is already pointing almost straight up and I'm definitely removing radiator. But since this is my first time doing this level repair I'd like to completely remove engine and check rear crankshaft seal and valve cover gasket for leaks in comfortable(!) position.

Chain hoist and leveler shorten lifting max with about 22" (55cm) so I might remove leveler and use short chains instead. Damn this is exciting! =)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The engine does not weigh that much.  You could build a simple A frame out of 2x4 with a 2.x6 cross beam.  That ill hold the engine and give you plenty of reach to lift it clear of the engine bay.

 

Read up on the rear breather plate and leave the rear seal alone unless you know for sure it's leaking.  99.9% of the time it's the breather plate leaking.

 

Larry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent, now I'm in the point to separate engine from transmission, unfortunately driver side of block doesnt seem no realize it. Right hand side separates almost inch but left hand resist. I followed partly Subaru Impreza 93-96 repair manual and it differs where it says  to remove plug to screw in bolt into release fork shaft to remove it. Theres no plug nor threaded hole and I figured that applies only to turbo models. At home I checked http://www.uklegacy.com/forums/index.php/topic/9328-ej20-na-engine-removal-step-by-step-guide/ and this guide doesn't mention about plug thingy either so I guess I just need a bigger hammer =)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Make sure you are clear of the Frame with the engine mount.

The alignment pins can be rusted in.  You can try driving them forward or put a large screwdriver between the engine and trans and then move the passenger side back towards the trans.

Keep the space between the engine and trans as close to the same as you can side to side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The alignment dowel is seized in the bell housing. DO NOT try to pull the free side away or you will crack the bellhousing.

 

Put a prybar or large screwdriver in the bellhousing on the stuck side about halfway down and try to pry it apart.

 

If you don't have room to get the engine over the front support, just take the car down off the jack stands. The trans will rest on the cross member, so you dont have to worry about holding it up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whee, its out! Sprayed a bit WD-40 into crack, more wiggling, chisel + hammer combo, shaking and prying with crowbar it gave in! After removing flywheel no oil leaks from rear oil seal nor plastic baffle plate, but driver side valve cover gasket and plate held by two bolts on opposite side probably end of camshaft leak nastily.

Wonder I get by just by replacing clutch disc and release bearing and scuff flywheel and clutch cover side with sandpaper or angle grinder since they are quite smooth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congratulations Tremmor!  Good going!  Since you're already in there might be advisable to replace the plastic baffle plate with a metal one anyway.

 

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Replace the whole clutch. The spring in the pressure plate weakens with time and you lose pressure on the clutch disc.

 

Replace the plastic separator plate while its out. They crack and warp and start leaking.

Also replace the O-ring under the diamond shaped cover opposite of the rear main.

If the rear main is dry leave it alone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To add.

 

Replace the springs (dealer only part) for the throw out bearing and closely examine the fork for any cracks, if so replace it.

 

O.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sachs clutch kit arrived but unfortunately lack of other stuff delays installation some days. Oh, and those two lower nuts in transmission case that are hard to reach I found that using dual box wrench, mebbe it was 14mm and 13mm, and slide hammer with hook attachment, it was easy to break open without busting knuckles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Totally agree engine removal for clutch replacement,

This is how I do it as well particularly if don't have access to a hoist / pit.

Also agree to purchase a full kit,  it should include clutch disc, pressure plate, release bearing and spigot shaft bearing (housed in centre of flywheel.) other wise false economy / job not done properly.

A lot easier than groveling on the ground with axle stands removing transmission.

And agree, a good opportunity to deal to oil leaks while out ie  flywheel/crank oil seal, cam cover gaskets, easy spark plug replacement etc and  

 A  good opportunity to do cam belt / water pump etc replacement if due as well.

While clutch apart take flywheel off and take to an automotive recondtioners machine shop and get the face of flywheel machined if its scored from worn previous clutch .

Otherwise new clutch will shudder on engagement if you don't do this.

Edited by subnz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Closer visual inspection after cleaning flywheel revealed hairlinecracks, the longest is about  0,6" (15mm) long.

 

General overview after scuffing with 120 grit paper

http://oi60.tinypic.com/2u77ot4.jpg

 

Closeup crack in flywheel, you can feel it with fingernail

http://oi58.tinypic.com/2r5f7lt.jpg

 

I'm starting to think there is no such a thing as quick clutch job unless you happen to have all spare parts already. =)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have time to wait, get it machined to try and take most of those out. Probably wouldn't cause a problem with engagement but they can cause premature wear on the clutch disc facing that runs against the flywheel.

Edited by Fairtax4me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn, improvised clutch disc alignment tools made by rolling masking tape around torx socket, or masking tape around tire valve installation cone didnt do the trick. 3 hours wasted wiggling engine back and forth until figured to insert 12mm drill bit into pilot bearing and then place old pilot bearing after pressure plate. Now it was easy to eyeball center of clutch disc and fasten bolts, after that engine went in smoothly. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last time I made a pilot tool it was with a large 1/2" drive socket that fit into the clutch hub, slipped over a 3/8" socket extension wrapped with electric tape so the big socket fit snug.

On the end of the extension I used a socket that fit into the pilot bearing. I think it was 10mm. Worked out better than the crappy plastic alignment tools they supply in clutch kits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whee, drove it out from garage carefully and tried to get feel for low grabbing clutch. Then headed to gas station and soonish started to listen whats that sound, its was like dry and loud bearing. Fortunately it was only hood support that was loose and it was rubbing against powersteering pulley.  Gonna adjust clutch cable later to get it grab a bit higher like it was before operation.

 

I didnt replace baffle plate since dealer couln't give date when it would arrive. But if I learnt something from this clutch  change episode it would be: Be prepared. Order stuff beforehand, get used flywheel and have it machined, Take pictures what goes where, take pictures from other angles too. Make notes. Put parts in safe place where you find them, label hoses. Get torq specs etc.

 

Thank you very much for helping me out! Saved a big penny and learned lotsa of new stuff! =)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn, improvised clutch disc alignment tools made by rolling masking tape around torx socket, or masking tape around tire valve installation cone didnt do the trick. 3 hours wasted wiggling engine back and forth until figured to insert 12mm drill bit into pilot bearing and then place old p

                     

    

    

 

            

            

                

 

                    Posted 26 February 2014 - 08:33 AM

                    

                

                

                

                    

Whee, drove it out from garage carefully and tried to get feel

for low grabbing clutch. Then headed to gas station and soonish started

to listen whats that sound, its was like dry and loud bearing.

Fortunately it was only hood support that was loose and it was rubbing

against powersteering pulley.  Gonna adjust clutch cable later to get it

grab a bit higher like it was before operation.

 

I didnt replace baffle plate since dealer couln't give date when it

would arrive. But if I learnt something from this clutch  change episode

it would be: Be prepared. Order stuff beforehand, get used flywheel and

have it machined, Take pictures what goes where, take pictures from

other angles too. Make notes. Put parts in safe place where you find

them, label hoses. Get torq specs etc.

 

 

Thank you very much for helping me out! Saved a big penny and learned lotsa of new stuff!

 

 

 

 

 

Yep its all a leaning curve  DIY,  I remember from  doing my 1st clutch not refacing flywheel surface had clutch judder /chatter issues but they get less / sort of go away after a while when clutch disc wears / beds in.

 

Sorry forgot to mention  / talk about making / improving a clutch disc alignment tool (out of a series of sockets on rod) etc

back in previous message but you got that figured out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update: Don't forget to attach alternator plug all the way in so it locks or you might have to get your car towed when battery dies. Now I know it doesnt throw charging warning light at dash! :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update: on the way to home I noticed nasty sound coming from front of the car it was like something was loose. Gear in neutral pressed gas pedal and noise got louder, but it was still there when car was idling. Then I noticed that pressing clutch pedal made noise quieter, turned clutch cable adjustment screws few turns tighter and sound went away. Either those screws need some thread locker or some glue type thingy to prevent vibration to loosen them or clutchdisc got broken in maybe, I dont know.  Anyway, time for short test drive to verify theory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you replace the clips that hold the release bearing to the release lever?

When those break the release bearing rattles around between the lever and the pressure plate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×