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Sapper 157

Body Work and Rust Repair on 84 GL Wagon. a little help please

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Ok so im going to do a little rust removal and repainting on my GL wagon. The rust isnt so bad that I will need to take it to a body shop so I would like to do it myself and save a bundle. My plan so far is to remove all rust with rust removers and fine-grit sand paper, then to use Bondo to replace the lost metal, and then repaint. The last part seems to be the greatest challenge so far... I CANT FIND THE RIGHT *BLEEPING* PAINT!!! :banghead:  The only color info I have on my car is a tab under the hood that says "color number 243". So far, not a single online automotive paint store has what im looking for when I enter that number. Its the standard 84 wagon light blue, which i thought was pretty common on the wagons and would therefor be at least somewhat common on the paint market. Can someone please give me some wisdom on this?? Or at least the right info (like what the actual name of the paint is) so I can enter it in the websites and get the right paint.

 

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Hey guys great news... I found the right paint online at paintscratch.com. :headbang:  :banana:  :banana:  :headbang:

Still need some suggestions for a protective coating that I can apply to metal to prevent rust though

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If your air painting it buy rustoleum rusty metal primer and add mineral spirits to be able to spray with the gun. I think they also sell it in the spray can so you can do it that way too.

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I would use a real two part automotive primer over rustoleum/rattle can primer if you want it to last. If you don't want to spray it cause of all of the nasty fumes you can use a roller. If you use the roller method you want to use a primer that has a high build so you can sand it after it dries. If you put the primer on wet it will somewhat flatten out on its own but you will still need to sand it.

 

Sand any area you want to prime first and clean it real well. After the primer dries sand it with 600 grit wet paper.

 

I have been using this eastwood epoxy primer for my cheaper projects. It seems to work pretty well for how cheap it is. (pro grade primer can be around 300 to 400 a gallon.)

 

http://www.eastwood.com/gray-epoxy-primer-eastwood.html

 

A real paint shop will have a book of color chips and will be able to corrolate that color number to a paint mix. You might be better off going to a local supplier than buy it online and have it shipped. They can even put a custom mix into rattle cans if you need that. Some of the better ones use a special camera to match the actual color on your car since the stuff mixed to the subaru color chip won't account for years of fading. If youre painting the whole car you don't have to worry about that though.

Edited by stratman977

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For the paint color match I found that the local Autobody and paint store (Westco) can color match anything in whatever quantity anyone can want and can also put it into an aerosol sol for those that don't have a paint gun. can also do this with top coat.

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I just did some body work on pretty extensive rust spots on my '90 Loyale. I followed this video 

and it turned out very well.

I agree withMykeys Toy above. Go with a local paint shop. They will match the three digit # and you'll be supporting a local business!  I got great service and more than enough paint for under 15 bucks.

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Yeah no worries on matching the color. I went to paint scratch and they gave me the exact touch up paint that i needed. But still keep this thread going for general body work advice and rust removal

:)

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I use a canned rust stop product from Napa for all my rust treatment.  Dries hard and black, keeps the rust from flaking.

 

Then I use PPG "Shopline" or "Omni" Epoxy primer( about $200 for 1 gal. primer and 2 quarts hardener to spray 1.5 gallons)

 

First coat, sand with 220, then 320.......then spray second coat......sand with 400, then 600, then 800 and up to 1000 or 1500 depending on just how "flat" you want the final look under the color.

 

Then I use the same epoxy primer, thinned 10~15% with DT870 Urethane reducer.....and spray it as a sealer.

 

Then Base coat/Clear coat...........or Enamel coat.  I preffer Base/Clear.  Enamels can be finicky....and in my experience more likely to chip deeply......whereas the base clear will just scratch and can be buffed out.

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Gloyales advice above is good except don't sand above 800 grit before the color coat. The paint needs the scratches to adhere to and you don't want too fine of a finish. And the 600 to 800 grit is wet not dry. If you sand dry use 400 grit at the most. Also be sure that the primer you are using is meant to be sanded.

 

You should sand at least an inch past any rusted metal to ensure you got it all. They do sell a 2 part glue, to glue in a metal patch if you don't have a welder. That will make it last much longer than just packing the hole with bondo. It's really best the cut out all of the rusted metal if possible rather than try to grind it.

 

The most important thing you can do to prevent rust from comign back is to coat the back side of the repair with your primer.

 

It sounds in your case you want to patch a small area, primer it, then blend in some paint.  You need to make sure you scuff the area around the primer where you plan to blend to. Before you paint it also helps to rub the area with your thinner. It softens up the paint. You want to slightly overlap the old paint with the first coat and then gradually extend a little with each coat. This makes the repair not as noticable.

Edited by stratman977

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Gloyales advice above is good except don't sand above 800 grit before the color coat. The paint needs the scratches to adhere to and you don't want too fine of a finish. And the 600 to 800 grit is wet not dry. If you sand dry use 400 grit at the most.

 

 If you stop at 400 you will have swirleys and scrathes visible in the color.  First coat of primer needs some texture to adhere to plastic filler, metal, and original paint.........but after that it doesn't need to be rough for primer, sealer, and color to adhere.......you want the smoothest finish possible for the best results.

 

If you want to see mirror image under the clearcoat when your done.........Finish with 1000 or or even 1500 before sealer. 

 

The sealer will adhere wonderfully to the primer as it's really the same paint w/ a reducer added to make a scratch free.  that's the point of sealer......you don't sand it before spraying color.....this is standard technique.......So why do you think the primer needs "scratched" before basecoat?

 

I don't wet sand anything but Clearcoat.  The epoxy primer sands well and with fewer clumps dry sanding.......gotta do small amounts and tap out the clumps from the paper every so often.

Edited by Gloyale

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Not trying to offend you but If you talk to a professional body man you will get different advice than what you just gave.

 

You don't sand the sealer because you apply it just before paint. If you wait more than 24 hours you have to scuff and re-seal. It forms a chemical bond with the base coat rather than a mechanical bond with the scratches.

 

Point is if your relying on mechanical bond you need 400 grit dry scratches or 600 wet scratches. If youre applying within the drying window you get chemical bond and don't need scratches.

Edited by stratman977
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Not trying to offend you but If you talk to a professional body man you will get different advice than what you just gave.

 

I went to school 3 semesters at certified Collision Repair School.

 

Didn't want to do it for a career so I am not certified.....but I have a "professional" background in this.

Edited by Gloyale
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I am not certified either but have similar training as you. I still disagree with you but arguing isn't helping the OP because I doubt he is doing anything other than a backyard pack and spray.

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I still disagree with you but arguing isn't helping the OP because I doubt he is doing anything other than a backyard pack and spray.

 

*Game show host voice* "YYYOOUUUUUUU GOT IT JOHNNY!!"

 

thats excatly what im gonna do. Its just  minor rust so it im not gonna make a big deal out of it. Im gonna try to do the best job possible but im not looking for pure perfection. 

Edited by Sapper 157

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Nothin for that except welding in a new panel.

 

Good news is that panel is fairly easy to make out of sheet metal.

 

You could fab it from the roof panel of a wagon!

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Sorry I have already removed most of the rust and put bondo on but ill post pics of the finished product when Im done

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