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So I got a new battery after I had my old one tested at Auto Zone and they said it was bad. New battery is good and worked fine, but after three days I went to start it and I got nothing that time. It can't be the starter cuz that is new too, I had it put in some months back and didn't even run the car that much, plus I had my brother tap it while I tried to start car and still nothing. Anybody got any idea? Could it be the alternator?

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I kindly suggest you to Verify the Fusible Links, 

 

They're on the Black Box, mounted directly to the Coolant's overflow tank.

 

Kind Regards.

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Check for loose connection s in the charging system. Loyale alternators. Every one I have had runs about 150,000 miles and then one of the brushed has worn out, causing diminished output. No dashboard indication of the failure. Eventually the battery is discharged to the point it won't crank the engine.

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battery cable connection somewhere

What do I look for when checking that out? I hear people all the time talking about a loose or bad battery connection, but where do I look for it? I've tightened the terminals as much as possible.

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I'd first check the battery for charge. Not sure if the headlights can be turned on with the engine not running but put the ign key in the run position and check the brightness of the headlights. There is a rocker switch just behind the steering wheel that is there for the 4-way flashers. Use it to see if the flashers work. If you have headlights/flashers than the battery is not the problem. 

 

You stated the starter was recently changed. Check the battery and ground cable at the starter for tightness. 

 

Also check that small wire at the starter solenoid is still attached. 

Edited by john in KY

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check the wire itself where its clamped onto the terminal. You might be good and tight on the post but often its the wire connection itself. I'm sure it got bent around during installation.

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Check for loose connection s in the charging system. Loyale alternators. Every one I have had runs about 150,000 miles and then one of the brushed has worn out, causing diminished output. No dashboard indication of the failure. Eventually the battery is discharged to the point it won't crank the engine.

My alternator is about 3 years old and I have run the car quite a lot in that time, do you think an alternator should go that soon?

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you can ask for and get the best advice and get nowhere if you have no test tools or methods. First method without tools would be a push start if a manual stick shift. Then if it still did not start you are stuck further up that creek or down the street :)

 

To me, sounds very typical, seen it many times, your alternator stopped charging, so you buy a new battery and same troubles begin a few days later, or sooner if you drive with lights on! This happened to me in last month, just fitted a spare battery which went flat too quick - had just one start in it :( and stranded me. The alternator brushes were at their most worn, sending one copper slip ring black. I have bought 2new brushes A$8 from a auto elec shop and new bearings 6201 and now need a press to get the front one out before I can finish and test my work.

 

A borrowed or even stolen multimeter can be useful to measure what volts in battery and any different once running which should be about 14.2 measured at battery or even back of alternator.

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First thing to do.  After doing nothing to draw power from the battery for several hours - measure the voltage.  12.0 or less = fully discharged, forget starting.  12.6 fully charged.  If it is 12.6 or more, turn something on - parking lights, 4ways, headlights.  The voltage should drop a few tenths while the item/s are on. 

 

This tests the battery and the connections, with the exception that once in a great while, a connection can be dirty enough to stop cranking level current, but still allow headlights to work.

 

Checking the connections does not only mean tightening the nuts / screws / etc.  Make sure they are clean, wires are in the crimps good, not corroded, no evidence of heating.  Once clean, a small amount of wheel bearing grease prevents corrosion.

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Here is the absolute best way to figure this out. Grab a battery from another car that you know is charged. Put it in your Subaru. If your Subaru starts, turn on the heater fan and the headlights and then go disconnect the battery while the engine is running. Bre careful not to touch the positive wire to anything. If the car dies, you have a bad alternator. If it keeps running, your issue is somewhere else.

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HF has a battery / alternator tester for about $7.  Nice thing to have on hand.

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battery cable connection somewhere

Yeah, I think that's what it is. I saw that one of the clamps on the battery terminal is a TAD bit loose, so I'll try putting a shim on it and see what happens.

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Most of the major car parts places will test the alternator for you for free, why not run it over and find out?

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