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Head gasket sealant

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My factory shop manual says to use sealant when replacing the head gaskets, it says to use tri bond or equivalent, what is the equivalent? Is sealant even nessacary? Thanks

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No sealant required or used that I have ever heard.

Vast majority praise "Fel-pro" head gaskets as being the best and that's what I have used with no needed sealant.

Also, no follow up torque required as written in some manuals when using the Fel-pro brand as stated by others who have been doing this for years.  

Edited by Indrid cold
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your question is somewhat ambiguous. FSM does say to use sealant when replacing headgaskets - if by that you mean *during* a headgaskets job. If I'm the other hand, you mean actually using it *on* the headgaskets then reread it or throw those directions away and get some proper directions.

 

No sealant on gaskets.

 

Tribond goes on cam carrier. Anaerobic sealant or RTV or right Stuff are often used instead.

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It is so, according to subaru's literature ver Batem ( apply sealant "three bond 1201" or equivalent evenly to both sides of cylinder head gasket with a brush) .

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It is so, according to subaru's literature ver Batem ( apply sealant "three bond 1201" or equivalent evenly to both sides of cylinder head gasket with a brush) .

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It is so, according to subaru's literature  .

 

Nope, it doesn't, or the Subaru FSM for the typical engines in this forum doesn't say that. I attached a picture of the FSM showing headgasket installation with no mention of sealant "Install headgasket".

post-3989-0-53308500-1473936310_thumb.png

 

What engine?

What is your source of information?

 

This would all be simpler if you'd show you're hand.  Miscommunication usually makes things take longer, inefficient, and causes issues - that's what's happening now.

 

Take a picture or post a link or otherwise describe exactly what "Subaru literature" says this.

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I'm using spray on copper gasket sealer on my head gaskets  it outlasted the motor i use it mostly because I surfaced my heads and block myself so the copper sealer gets to all the imperfections in the mating surface the there are a lot of poor quality head gaskets out there so be careful felpro brand is usaly a safe bet I used a cheap gasket once and it never sealed  I replaced it with the copper coated felpro gaskets and it lasted the life of the engine the use of sealent on the head gaskets was probably a very old procedure using poor quality gaskets they have come a long way since our cars where made and in most cases the gaskets if good quality should already have a layer of sealent like stuff on them that replaces the need to add sealent so unless your making your own head gaskets or buying $5 eBay head gaskets or are in a pinch and cant get your heads surfaced you won't need sealent the sealent won't fix a warped or damaged head there is a time and place for head gasket sealent but these days its just a cheap way around doing the job right cheap out on the machine work your gonna need sealer cheap out on the gaskets your gonna need sealer do the job right you won't need sealer do the job right it will last a long time the sealent will break down faster than the head gasket causing a leak the copper holds up well but its still a bandaid

 

 

 

 

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My situation is of some relevance. There is lots to read here. Have just acquired an EA82 engine. (Scroll down for my question.) It was rebuilt some years ago and it has never yet been fired up as only assembly lube is visible. [No oil added yet.]  History [quality] of rebuild is unknown. Came with a box of parts. Intake manifold for a carb [carb was missing], a Subaru alternator, new TB kit using MBL Three Star belts [good] . I removed the oil pan to maybe learn more about the rebuild and the pan bolt torque was appropriate. [not over torqued]. Turning the 22mm crank bolt showed smooth operation of bottom end. And both the new cork pan gasket and the oil filter had a very light layer of assembly lube on them, so it looks like the rebuilder knew some things. It is evident that the case was split open as a tough grey rubbery sealant is slightly visible along the join seam. A clean job but I would guess not a factory Subaru sealant. [So bottom end was addressed]. Cam towers show the same grey sealant and cam shaft bearings show a bit of assembly lube oozing out [good]. Valve covers have new gaskets and 9 new bolt grommet. The new gaskets [still pliable] have NO sealant used. [also good].   Oil pump has a "D 6 Y 22" marking on it, looks to be perhaps new, and not sure if it is Atsugi or Beck-Arnely made.   

      So, for $100 bucks this could not be passed up. Either it will run like new or it will suffer from poor piston/cyl walls, wrong main bearing tolerances, misaligned case halves[ most likely]  or ???    

      HERE ARE TWO QUESTIONS- The corners of the head gaskets show a slight squeeze out of a dark brown or bronze sealant. Is that a reasonable choice used by some? Maybe those tiny dabs of gasket sealant [look like Permatex product] were added at the far corners because of the water jackets that are nearby. While engine is out I can easily enough redo both head gaskets using Felpro permatorque if unsure. Or, might another safe bet be to install and run the engine up to temp and then re-torque "unknown" head gaskets?

 

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I would probably have bought it.  Throw it in a car the next time I needed to swap.  See what happens.  Even if it runs long enough to reseal the original engine.  But I have 2 EA82 powered cars, so if one has a bigger problem, well, it's not a huge problem.

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Yeah. Throw it in and run it. Even if engine self destructs I can still walk away with new TB parts, good cams, and maybe good heads. Will use orig specified oil and stay close to home when running it under some load.    Your 2 cars turbo?   My Loyale [FWD, SPFI, non turbo]  has been good to me past 17 years and I look forward to maybe this latest engine as being a good thing. Or close, as nothing like original factory build quality. Anyway, the other EA82 [under powered as it is] will be resealed and ready to swap back in.    

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If the intake and exhaust aren’t bolted on yet....and carrier?...or if you just want to do it and check it out and verify installation/gasket, then maybe that makes it more enticing to do now.

Otherwise, run it.

Those head gaskets are installed dry but enough people put stuff on them that you’re likely to be fine.

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idosubaru     EA82 now sitting solidly on a shelf in my garage. No intake . No exhaust. No water. No oil. Assembly lube still intact and all openings securely covered by heavy duty aluminum foil tape or plastic plugs. Oil pan is on. Timing belts are on.

 

        There is no way to verify how main bearings, piston/cyl, case alignment factors will play out until started up. My thoughts are if these head gaskets need a re-torque after running up to temp. I put Felpro Permatorque head gaskets [did the work myself] on my Loyale eleven years ago with no problems since. Felpro were blue in color and these are grey metal. I don't mind the time it takes for the re-torque process, but it will drive me crazy if the engine is in the car with that cramped work space. I will be much happier to just install Felpro permatorque gaskets and be done with it. But the thought of undoing another's work bothers me a little. Especially when they did it with more knowledge and experience than I have. A bit meta-physical there, I know.

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Mine are not turbo.  Turbo were MPFI also, iirc.  Mine are SPFI.  Been running and maintaining EA82 wagons since 1988.  I've had several, since salt on roads in winter kills the bodies.  Now that I have my house and shop built, I have more time to stay ahead of rust, etc.

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4WD? Mine is FWD.  When I drive my 97 Honda Accord for a while it seems more cushy than the Loyale Wagon. But when I drive the Loyale again it is always a pleasure somehow. There is more feel of the road when driving the Loyale. And it has just enough power for me.     Say, do you have that book "How to Keep Your Subaru Alive"? I have it on pdf.

 

 

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Mine are 4WD.  My 87 was originally FWD, but I added the parts to make it 4WD from one of my retired due to rust cars.  Yeah, if they had more power, I'd be more likely to get in trouble using it.  

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