Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hello!

 

I have oil leaking from front of engine and would like to remove my oil pump to check for pump and seal failures. I am wondering if anyone has had experience performing this without removing the engine or if this would even be possible. I would love to hear any advice/steps involved in the process if so.

 

I drive a 99 Subaru legacy outback Wagon with the ej25 engine.

 

To me it looks like it can be done, but I wanted to get an experienced second (or more) opinion before diving in.

 

Thanks in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More than likely it's the front seal, not the oil pump itself.

You can remove just the seal (careful not to scratch the shaft) and replace. it would take another half hour or so to pull the pump. Check the screws on the back, clean and dry both surfaces and reinstall.

Now would be a good time to replace the t belt etc if its due to be done soon.

Get the o ring for the pump from the dealer. Cost me less than $3 two weeks ago.

You need a good sealant. I prefer anaerobic, for it doesn't set up in air.

The FSM is available. In New Gen FAQ sticky. 2nd page under my name.

To give yourself room to work, all you need to remove are the fans, not the radiator.

 

O.

Edited by ocei77

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, do the T-Belt, Cam and Crank Seals and the Oil pump screws on the back and the oring seal.  

 

I use Gray RTV to seal the pump to the block.  Light coat, and I like to let it set for 24 hours before I start the engine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you guys for the quick replies! Ocei - thank you for the fsm. That will definitely come in handy. I'll hopefully have some time to get it done this weekend and will update once I finish.

 

My t-belt is looking good so I will probably be changing out seals and then removing the pump to check screws and re-send it as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you know the mileage of the timing stuff? usually the belt outlives the idlers. When one goes, it takes the belt and your valves with it.

 

If it's known mileage you can put it off to its next increment. If not, it's cheap peace of mind since the labor needs done anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey guys. I got everything pulled apart and am slightly confused by the way things are lining up with regard to timing.

 

I will be replacing timing belt, idlers, tensioner, water pump, cam and crank seals, and resealing oil pump.

 

I got crank bolt loose using 5th gear trick (I have a manual), put it back in neutral and lined everything up - marks looked good. Once I had marked cam and crank sprockets with paint marker I put it back in 5th and popped the cam bolts loose with the belt and tensioner still on.

 

The entire system rotated slightly during this process (had a small bit of play even when locked in 5th gear, maybe 1/10-1/16 crank rotation). So I put it back in neutral and realigned everything by manually rotating the crank (~2 full crank rotations minus the slight bit it shifted when popping cam bolts). This was done with the cam bolts popped loose but not loosened more than 1/2 turn. Now my lines on the passenger side cams are not lined up correctly. The drivers side cams are still lined up and the top passenger cam looks good but the bottom passenger cam is off by one tooth (the paint mark I had made before popping cam bolts is 1 tooth to the left of 12 o clock on bottom passenger cam with the rest of the system correctly aligned).

 

I am wondering how to proceed from here - can I take the belt off and align cams based on my initial marks when installing the new belt? Perhaps the bottom passenger side cam slipped slightly when popping the bolt? Not sure why it isn't lining up correctly now when it had lined up well before popping the cam bolts. Any advice or pointers for realigning the system would be greatly appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Make sure the cams bolts are tight first.

Remove belt and compress tensioner.

Reinstall tensioner and realign belt.

Push down slightly on belt to hold position and release tensioner.

All should stay in alignment at this point.

Put large screwdriver into flywheel teeth, so it butts against the inspection hole.

Have some else hold the brake while you tighten the crank bolt.

 

O.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×