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Loyale Rear Brake Lines

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Hi all,

 

Pops needs to replace the rear brake lines on his 94 loyale. They both ruptured right at some spot that they attach to the frame(?). I doubt the dealer will stock these things, and a junkyard might be the last option he'd like to pursue...so are these lines easily fabricated? Are they a universal size? Is it pissible to find replacements at a local parts store perhaps under a sinilar vehicle etc...?Just curious what im getting into as I will be helping him with them. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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This if it's the hoses http://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog/subaru,1990,loyale,1.8l+h4,1270055,brake+&+wheel+hub,hydraulic+hose,1792. If it's the hard lines you need to buy a double flare tool and replace the section that's rusted away.

 

Don't screw around trying to make double flares.  Very tough to get it right.

 

Just buy a length of flexible line.  Close to the same length, and bend it around to fit

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Don't screw around trying to make double flares.  Very tough to get it right.

 

Just buy a length of flexible line.  Close to the same length, and bend it around to fit

 

Wha?

 

Flares are easy with a half decent tool. Get the cut straight a deburred, and you almost can't screw it up.

 

I have one of these that I bought for about $20 at Autozone. I highly recommend it, I've never screwed up a flare with it:

ATD-5480_exploded.jpg

 

 

 

Most bulk steel line that you would buy from the parts store is very mild steel. I would recommend the Nickel-Copper stuff, it's easier to work with, and will resist rust for much longer. I've done it on several Subarus, including my XT6 last fall.

Edited by Numbchux
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The aftermarket stainless steel brake lines for an STI are a nearly bolt-in solution for the rear lines on an EA81 or EA82.

Ooh! I have to check mine, if they need replacing, that's what I'll do.

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For rear disc brakes, anyway, yea. They definitely wouldn't thread right into a wheel cylinder, although maybe an adapter of some sort exists.

 

These are Centric/StopTech 95047501 rear lines (looked up for a 2002 Impreza) on my XT6. The included banjo bolt threads right in where the hose was, and seals on the face of the housing just like the hose did. I opted to route it behind the shock, and clip it into the bracket on the trailing arm.

36122143606_1a935265a1_k.jpg2017-07-25_02-22-30 by Numbchux, on Flickr

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Oh, yeah, I have drum brakes. Well, at least I could get stainless line. I have a bender and flaring tools.

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They both ruptured right at some spot that they attach to the frame(?)

 

Does anyone else find it weird that two different lines would rupture at the same time?  That seems very odd and unlikely, but I guess if that's what failed it is what it is. 

 

I've done it and find flaring those lines can be troublesome, access matters, i've definitely tried some that were just hard to get to that I probably should have chosen differently.  If it's tucked away somewhere and hard to access then find a more suitable access point or try to avoid flaring.  You can even run all the line and then have a shop do any flares you need

 

The aftermarket stainless steel brake lines for an STI are a nearly bolt-in solution for the rear lines on an EA81 or EA82.

it is the rear EJ that fits the rear EA right?  

i have two sets i need to install some day, although I have no rust, so maybe it's pointless. 

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The WRX rear lines are a few inches longer than the STI ones.  While the longer lines make it possible to swing the caliper up out of the way on one bolt as designed, it also leaves a lot more line to get snagged on something or to bounce around.

I've got the WRX lines on my EA81T and the STI lines on my EA82.  Either part number will work, it's just a matter of if you want ease of service, or a more offroad-durable setup.

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Wha?

 

Flares are easy with a half decent tool. Get the cut straight a deburred, and you almost can't screw it up.

 

I have one of these that I bought for about $20 at Autozone. 

ATD-5480_exploded.jpg

 

 

If the line is sanpped either place I can imagine, It will just be easier and cheaper.   If it's the line that runs along the trailing arm, it's easy to replace the whole section with a 20" piece of ready made, fitted line.  

 

If it's where it comes out of the body, the line is likely rusted too much to get a purchase to cut, unless you did it inside under the seats.  Then you are still buying the fitting to slip on after the line, and new line to replace the cut out section.

 

You Chux, are a top level seasoned Suby pro, so to speak.  You have developed the long term skill of how to do things like this.

 

I get the feeling the OP of this thread may not be so seasoned.  I think he's got a better shot at an easy, succesful repair by buying an easily available off the shelf piece.

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Yep. The under the seats ones are the ones I don't like. Limited space. That's not s good first time flare tool location unless you're really familiar and quick to learn tooling and sealing and processes.

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The key to flaring is to get some line and a good, old school flaring tool. There are several KEY steps involved in making a perfect double flare, or (for Subaru) bubble flare. 

 

I use an old American made Imperial Brass double flaring kit. These are all over ebay for about $50:

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Imperial-Brass-Brake-Flaring-Tools-Set-/122596053186?hash=item1c8b4b50c2:g:c0oAAOSwdGFYnNJm

 

First - Subaru's use 4.5mm brake line. 3/16" is essentially the same. So you can use a 3/16" double flaring tool to do bubble flares by flipping the anvil over to the flat side. 

 

1. You MUST cut the tubing absolutely square. Best to use a small tubing cutter for this. 

 

2. You MUST carefully bevel the OD of the tube, AND chamfer the ID of the tube with a drill bit. If you don't the tubing will be too thick on the end and it will split. 

 

3. Use valve lapping compound on the anvil to keep it from slipping on the tubing. 

 

4. Use a light oil to lubricate the tool and the tubing. Use sparingly. 

 

5. Heat the end of the tubing slightly with a propane torch before each step. This helps to soften it and prevent cracking and work hardening. 

 

6. PRACTICE. 

 

Some day you will need to do this for a proper repair. Get the tools and learn the skills. Your grandfather could do it - so can you. 

 

GD

Edited by GeneralDisorder
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In addition to the Eastwood tool, I have that same Imperial Brass double flaring set.

I've had that Imperial set for years as well as Imperial Eastman ones for larger single flares in 45* & 37* AN. Very necessary for industrial maintenance.

 

I use a fine mill file to square the tube end while tube is clamped, release the tube, deburr the end & then reinstall tubing for flaring. And a drop of 3-in-1 oil to prevent galling. 

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1. You MUST cut the tubing absolutely square. Best to use a small tubing cutter for this. 

 

2. You MUST carefully bevel the OD of the tube, AND chamfer the ID of the tube with a drill bit. If you don't the tubing will be too thick on the end and it will split. 

 

3. Use valve lapping compound on the anvil to keep it from slipping on the tubing. 

 

4. Use a light oil to lubricate the tool and the tubing. Use sparingly. 

 

5. Heat the end of the tubing slightly with a propane torch before each step. This helps to soften it and prevent cracking and work hardening. 

 

6. PRACTICE. 

 

Some day you will need to do this for a proper repair. Get the tools and learn the skills. Your grandfather could do it - so can you. 

 

GD

 

Other than step 1, I do none of this. Never had a crack, never had a leak. New steel, old metric steel, new NiCo....The only flares I've had to re-do were because I forgot the flare nut.

 

The inline flaring tool is a huge help.

 

Flaring tube was one of the earliest automotive projects I did, granted the first time was making an oil feed line for a turbo, so had to hold up to much lower pressures than the brake system, but it wasn't long before I was making brake lines too. I don't understand why people are afraid of it.

 

 

Yes, if there is a leak in the steel line somewhere, all the exposed line should be replaced. Flare new fittings in the lines under the back seat, and then use unions to attach the new line. That's pretty easy on a 4-door EJ car, as they're both on one side by the door. The EA82s have each line go through the floor on each side (even though they come together at the proportioning valve under the car), and doing it in my XT6 with aftermarket sport seats sucked more than a little, but totally doable.

 

I took a picture of the last one I did, this is on a '97 Legacy Wagon. There's a junction block under the car that was a solid block of rust. I bypassed that entirely, and ran new line up under the back seat. New M10x1.0 Inverted flare nuts, a pair of matching unions, and about 10 feet of NiCo 3/16"s line (I do it often enough that I buy it by the 25' roll).

35654073123_47f7e83052_k.jpg2017-08-09_08-16-18 by Numbchux, on Flickr

Edited by Numbchux
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Depends on the line you are using. If you are using stainless, or old american truck sized stuff..... And sometimes if you are doing it on-car you only get ONE shot at it because of the location or length of line you have to work with. I have had flaring operations in dark, dank holes go sideways and it's not pretty. The above recommendations are based on my experiences and will generally guarantee good results even with tough tubing and in poor working conditions. 

 

GD

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Its mentioned above that WRX rear lines are LONGER than STI ones, you sure that isnt the other way around? Does anyone have some specs of the stoptech lines or a catalog with measurements? Id be keen to find out...

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