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what car? miles? any attempts made yet to repair it?

 

you may be on the 'cusp' of low refrigerant - the sysem will protect itself and not engage the comp. if it's low on refrig Most common cause of low refrig is the 2 o-rings on the hoses at the comp.

 

 

some folks have had to change comp clutch clearance, others have had to change a/c relay.

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If the Mode control is set on front defog it will run the AC compressor regardless of the AC switch position.

 

Compressor still running at all means you have enough refrigerant left for the pressure switch to allow operation. Adding a half a can of refrigerant should get it good and cold again.

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If the Mode control is set on front defog it will run the AC compressor regardless of the AC switch position.

 

Compressor still running at all means you have enough refrigerant left for the pressure switch to allow operation. Adding a half a can of refrigerant should get it good and cold again.

Yes. It was in the front defog mode. Switched to regular heat mode and the ac compressor stopped cycling on and off.Thanks for your help.

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probably low on refrigerant.  on Subaru's i've repaired every non working, non-wrecked A/C by simply replacing orings and refilling with refrigerant.  Subaru's use roughly 20 ounces which is basically two small cans or one large one.  

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I am interested in something:
the majority of us can rebuild a lot of things, but it always seems like a.c. is off limits.


is there a source for rebuild kits for a.c. parts?

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I am interested in something:

the majority of us can rebuild a lot of things, but it always seems like a.c. is off limits.

 

 

is there a source for rebuild kits for a.c. parts?

Like what - to rebuild the compressor?

I’d Google it.

 

system parts are available from Subaru and/or aftermarket. Condenser evaporator drier...etc.

 

No one does it because it’s not remotely economical. Subaru AC is so easy to repair and maintain it’s pointless for most people.

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not that it couldn't be done, but I have never read of anyone rebuilding the compressor.

 

HAVING it rebuilt might be an option for some folks in some locales, but they are so reliable, a used one from car-part.com is a superb value for most folks if it comes to a 'bad' compressor.

 

I suspect some folks have been ---uh, ---unethically ? - sold new compressors when they just needed o-rings or maybe a hose.

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There's not much that's economically feasible the rebuild on an AC system.

Replacing o-rings, evaporator, condenser, hoses, filter/drier, or TXV/orifice tube anybody with half a grain of inclination can do. But it's important they understand what and how that part works with the rest of the system. And it's very important to understand that refrigerant in the system under high pressure can injure or kill you if you do something wrong.

 

As for rebuilding compressors, skip ahead in this video about 20 seconds for the exploded view of how a typical AC compressor looks inside.

It's a good view of what's going on during operation. They're difficult in the sense that there are quite a few moving parts, typically 6 or 8 Pistons moving in unison and some designs have double headed Pistons which means 12-16 cylinders where refrigerant is being compressed to upwards of 250psi. This requires very tight tolerances and extremely clean surfaces during assembly. Even one fleck of dust will start a chain reaction that will ruin a compressor.

It's not that it isn't doable, but it's best left to places that do rebuilds in a clean environment.

It's also generally cost prohibitive to replace internal parts of a compressor, if you can even find a source. There are places out there that sell compressor parts but they're hard to find and often don't cover a very large Range of compressors. Then imagine paying a shop 5-600 for labor for a compressor rebuild, when a new compressor can usually be bought for much less. Most people would rather have the new part.

Something like the clutch, magnet coil , or pulley bearing you can replace yourself with general ease if you can find the parts (They're not always available).

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cool video fairtax

 

it occurs to me, it might be a fun project to adapt an auto a/c compressor and make a steam engine out of it!

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