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Mitchy

Legacy II 2.2i, (BD) sedan, 1997

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Hi all

- my second post here!

Introducing our newly acquired, 22 year old Legacy Sedan, to compliment our ‘99 Forester workhorse.

Super cheap (for here), super well maintained with only 90,000 miles. Original Dark blue Pearl paint, perfect upholstery, belts changed at 60k, regular services under its one owner, clean oils all around, and four tyres of the same model and Michelin brand, a comfort after my first Subaru purchase (Forester SF) required a new centre diff due to mis-matched tyres.

I picked it up cheap as the vendor did not even know it was AWD.  

He wondered why I had asked for photos amongst others, of the underside of the rear end. When told him ‘differential’ he replied ‘its front wheel drive...’

when I answered ‘yes, as well ‘ his jaw dropped as he realised that he’d greatly underpriced this ageing, apparently unexciting generic Japanese sedan by quite a bit.

I did not haggle, to be fair to him....

Anyway, as in the vendor’s description, it runs like new, makes the right noises under all conditions, and is a pure joy to drive. I’m fresh in love with the EJ22.

To me its main fault is that it is a bit low to the ground, so a little 1” lift will be made soon.

Thanks for looking.

39DD898F-AD2C-4B50-9274-32465433609B.jpeg.546b30aa5b0008d31b1af2b1ef89fb4b.jpeg

841BC456-40B8-47CA-A45A-683A01D32FB0.jpeg.323cb9901f1abb63d286304b085f5507.jpeg

B210D1F7-FC6D-407E-8B65-ECDDAEC7BABE.jpeg.02dadfadd0881770347702ecd33c5a94.jpeg

 

Edited by Mitchy
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1 hour ago, 1 Lucky Texan said:

clean, classic look - that will be a good car for someone.

For me, I just bought it!

:burnout:

Edited by Mitchy
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Thank you

So far I have been looking over my Leggy in more detail. 

Nothing bad so far, and 4000km added since I bought it.

Oil and filters I changed yesterday, and earlier this week I replaced the 15” alloys with 14” steelies, (ugly)  VW type, and fitted using hub centric rings. 

I’m now running on new 195/70 r14 Firestone Multihawk 2 tires, with much more sidewall than the worn Michelin 195/60 r15 they have replaced:

63424B83-A9DC-4E31-953D-FD912C008D71.jpeg.b5611dde63af7c9fd606b21449f08e60.jpeg

-much happier on our track now and no noticeable difference on the asphalt!

Next up is the mild suspension lift for clearance as this Legacy sits low:

4077B973-3A09-4BA9-B861-B44C569ACB2D.jpeg.cdc749eddeb66c51269cefb474799be8.jpeg

 I’m going to test fit some cheapo HDPE strut spacers to see how it feels, and then see what my options are regarding taller struts or Subtle Solutions Aluminium spacers which I have been using on the Forester for years.

 I’m not certain if a set of Outback suspension will fit without modifications, can anyone help there?

 I’m going for this ride height:

42BF9A72-7747-4A1E-9910-253536BEBFEE.jpeg.45e37964d1f39c9edfb7396732a09ec2.jpeg

Other than that, a group N transmission mount will go in (the Forester has one fitted and it makes a big difference) to keep the tranny a little more secure.

This car has huge potential as a daily runner for 90% road and 10% track...Great fun.

thanks!

Edited by Mitchy

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Today I bought:

New NGK plugs and cables

Genuine thermostat

Superpro steering gearbox bushings

Gates rad top hose

Genuine clutch lever dust boot

And idler and pulley bearings for the air con...

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....And for that SUS off road style I have just discovered and bought these genuine new splash guards. Super-chuffed!!

They are the longer, more funcional flaps, rather than the stubbier ‘aero’ ones.

The rears come from the UK, 45euros or 50$ delivered to Spain. A bit more expensive than I’d like....

AC61B2A0-6DBC-474D-8F32-E6AA256E9A8B.jpeg.f2de13c6bcb782ad099197696afef32f.jpeg

A5B2C9F3-DF9B-4127-AC05-5BC5225C81AE.jpeg.345074ccb262d7b555ccd9cbee92d218.jpeg

The fronts I discovered on a Polish auction site after searching the part number; 20€ delivered!!! I don’t speak polish so I hope I did OK...

E1FE1D16-436A-4520-B8C9-3FC6BA2D0B4C.jpeg.fc9797b9fff3995654202c2c36fad9cd.jpeg

AF544CF8-2282-4F4C-AAD0-347931F63ED2.jpeg.ba2d9c1d3eeefc2b109ed36243561c18.jpeg

That has to be cheaper than anywhere else for new old stock parts in their box!!!! -evens up nicely for the expensive uk ones.

I previously tried some universal-fit ebay flaps, but they were deformed, and they deformed more when I tried to fit them to the car, so they went straight back to the supplier.

I can’t wait to get these on the car...:clap:

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Aaargh!

C946480F-9355-4BA1-98B0-647E6D0B1811.jpeg.84c629f1517905780e0f28434224a189.jpeg

cv boot split and spit- grease everywhere!

luckily I caught it early on. I then noticed that the cheapo outer boot on the same axle is severely deformed and leaking too.

I fished out one of the Forester’s original shafts which had the same inner boot split, and a good outer. Back in the day I just replaced it with a cheap aftermarket axle. A mistake, but that is another story....

Forester axle rescued from the shelf:

3CC49322-6C3D-4345-8C72-155CD1F1EBBD.jpeg.b3832092c3ef9c4db3756e73700ffc0f.jpeg

I never restored a driveshaft before, so taking apart the tri-pot, cleaning and rebuilding without mixing up parts was fun... 3x 30 needle rollers:

A5B35D4E-3463-4F3A-92DC-65BEA7A8B1E4.jpeg.df0a5d25489b1f85a42bc2775206f055.jpeg

but no big disasters, one minor stab wound and I have a shiny new cv joint to go back on:

D0E486AE-CA8A-42FC-A1BF-E93F61BD96D7.jpeg.39b9b11a5378e25eebdd57bb367ef309.jpeg

 

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Yes you can put Outback or Forester strut assemblies in the legacy.  They bolt right up.  Good to have new CV boots for that as they'll stretch and be more prone to break due to the harsher angle of the axles.  Particularly without any subframe spacers which the outbacks have and legacy's don't.  But you don't have to install those, lots of people don't. 

I've never had those needle bearings come out.  Did you make them come out on purpose to clean them or did they fall out?

In the US market that's an interference engine so get a new Subaru or AISIN timing kit installed as soon as you can. 

1997 can have the older and newer style tensioner but all of the 97's I've seen have the newer one piece tensioner like this:
https://www.amazon.com/97-98-Subaru-EJ22E-Timing-AISIN/dp/B00Y12ZFVC

(oddly that kit shows two more seals than you'll need - which is how many the 2.5 liter engine would need). 

The 1990-1997 two piece timing pulley and kit looks like this:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/For-Subaru-Impreza-Legacy-2-2L-4cyl-CA-Aisin-OEM-Timing-Belt-Water-Pump-Kit-NEW-/360702346753

The water pump, belt, and pulleys are all the same, it's only the tensioner that's different.  

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Yep, same boot, almost the same issue as what you have there. A few more months (maybe) and it would’ve gone the same way as yours. 

The other three boots up front are fine - because they’re not located near the exhaust! I’m lookig at making a heat shield for the boot to help increase its life expectancy. 

I hope that repaired shaft does the job for you ;) 

Cheers 

Bennie

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@idosubaru

This now-repaired driveshaft was from our Forester, which I removed and foolishly replaced with aftermarket about four years ago, and I stored the original ‘as is’.

As I had not cleaned it it still had the same dirty brown grease in the tri-pot. This time I decided it should be properly cleaned and re-greased, therefore I took EVERYTHING apart. I think it is necessary if the grease is known to be contaminated, plus solvents used to clean the exterior will undoubtedly get in between the needles and dilute the old grease.

Looks good, but the old contaminated grease inside is not reliable:

C3544BB8-3C64-46D8-9BD7-7781C89D994D.jpeg.bdeb0637b720ad0a7498439cf3f1dd3a.jpeg

Each of the three bearing assemblies on the tri-pot has a snap ring holding it in place. When this is removed, the bearing components just slide/fall out, depending on whether you expect it.

I blindly followed the Haynes advice (no snap rings holding the bearings on their model Outback), it was no big deal to remove and reinstall the needles. One bearing at a time, check positions of races first, etc. Just slide them in, one by one. At least I know they are freshly greased inside there! They roll much, much firmer than before, a good thing.

This repaired Forester one is going on the Legacy and then I can repair the newly-split Legacy one and put that on the Forester, as the 90$ aftermarket replacement  is now split, clicking and creaking after just four years.

I love having two cars with interchangeable parts!! 

Thanks for the information on timing parts. According to a sticker on the engine the belt was changed only 30k miles ago, I have not looked but I would assume that pulleys and tensioner are original, now at 90k miles. I should get that done asap!

 

@el_freddo

Yup that hot area above the exhaust is a problem. I was considering putting some large O rings in the pleats of the boot to protect it a little more.

I didn’t, but I might try it on the Forry. Its probably a terrible idea.

 

Thanks!

 

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Nice work on the needle bearings.  

The timing pulley bearings are just like the needle bearings except worse.  They’re sealed bearings so once they dry out theres nothing, not even old grease. The lower cogged idler is by far the most likely to fail but it’s generally good idea to replace them all while you’re in there. 

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Totally agree, I replaced the Forester with a Gates timing kit soon after buying the car. That was the Gates kit with 100% SKF japanese parts.

I have found a well-priced SKF kit with water pump for the Legacy.

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AISIN or Subaru parts are preferred.  Gates and other suppliers have modified to a moving target of parts sourcing and quality. 

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Quick comparison between the old ‘97 Legacy axleshaft and the ‘99 Forester’s donated and renovated shaft. The shafts are different, the Forester’s has a thicker shank, chamfered-out from the inner boot. All else appears to be the same, phew!.....

EFA02111-5726-463B-B791-725B4B5F8EC4.jpeg.42d845f2589c0830784949dd1a898c48.jpeg

-There is a good reason not to use ‘universal fit’ aftermarket boots and plastic cable ties.... the top joint had lost most of its grease at the wide end of the boot, coating the knuckle, control arm and brake cylinder housing. Well done you......

554E1AC6-8618-49A4-A953-655F6E8F7D76.jpeg.c25a458d3d3046aa8c3e6d97d3dbf30c.jpeg

That’s also a reason that I don’t pay local “mechanics” do do my dirty work. I have seen enough botch jobs due to lack of knowledge or laziness, I don’t trust them further than I can throw them.

So it is now installed and rolling nicely, 2 hours of taking it easy, cleaning up the grease spurts, and having a good look around.

How much does this job cost?

25€ for the boot kit. And I did it before breakfast! I reckon the previous poor repair cost 10 times as much.

——The worst part was manoeuvring the control arm to reinsert the ball joint, until I remembered to loosen the ARB slightly on the chassis and pop out the drop link from the control arm. Duh, Then it just found the hole.- Just remember to let the car down again on its wheels to re-tighten the ARB bolts!——

To disassemble the control arm from the balljoint I used the old trick of first loosening the castle nut a few turns, jacking up the knuckle (on the bottom outside edge of the brake disc with a wooden pad and the brakes engaged), placing packing (a non-valuable steel thingy) snugly between the knuckle and control arm, without squishing the balljoint rubber, and releasing the jack. If the metal packing thingy is the right size, it always pops out for me. So satisfying!

No penetrating oil, nothing. Rusty cars may be different!

No smashing or mashing with pickleforks either, I hate whacking my parts with hammers.

 

Edited by Mitchy

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Now that the repairs are done, I made the time to put the new plugs in too.

NGK plugs and cables.

Old plugs look great, but I don’t know how old they are. The old cables were the original Packards.

Small investment.

57FB3478-18FC-4DE4-995A-4DB39BDAD8FA.jpeg.3af7652bbe4ad835b568d5d30e6ed259.jpegE9C5D2DC-F9A3-4CE0-BDA4-3D96E9B724CA.thumb.jpeg.9c01f0ad51b0501c84c37a88e18bfd73.jpeg

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I have been making the most of time off between jobs, and today I finally got the rear struts out and lengthened, and mounted again!

Tomorrow I hope to repeat with the fronts.

Rear seats out, to gain some access to the top nuts, still tricky to access!

A2AEB0A1-B030-4DCD-BBA6-98E19A29E400.jpeg.acbcd6386e3938dddb5895048b318803.jpeg

Then cut the brake hose brackets, as I have no need to bleed the brakes yet.

DABA1E8B-16E8-48B9-8A9C-9B1DFC67F572.jpeg.7efd568b7dfc205377e5bf431da2361d.jpeg

Those ‘helpers’ don’t look to good- the texture of moist digestive biscuits!

F65AE6D1-E506-4C71-99FF-B948634FAADB.jpeg.1b5bf0aa75cabea05fee060230bc3e86.jpeg

 

No big problems, the hdpe spacers went on with no trouble, and it went back together quite quickly and smoothly. The second strut definitely took half as long as the first, of course!

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Paint marks on the strut bottom, rubber seat, spring, top seat and strut top really helps with reassembly.

Here is the 30mm spacer going on:

6BDC0011-47A7-4AD4-849C-BCEC1C9CB0B7.jpeg.7c49387c33807cec55aaa4700d5d575c.jpeg

Don’t forget to flip that cut tab back up and grease the clip:

2F90CB88-FC3A-407A-B48D-4BA15BB90D7E.jpeg.a4f351381f16224ed40b33df57339685.jpeg

 

Not a huge difference at the rear, but it will help clear those rocks on our ‘camino’. 

Tomorrow I will get on with the fronts.

8AC5E471-A272-4ADC-A6D8-B5A72FDBA293.jpeg.ceaada5d153faf8fd8a267f8ae5bdc00.jpeg

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I cut the brake hose brackets with this little thing. 7DB45415-A385-4C64-A47C-FA9F5197BA5C.jpeg.b8c72b2272f9964c8bfa57b826bb1865.jpeg

I use the wheel nut wrench from the tool kit to loosen and tighten the lower strut bolts. I also use a long cheater bar.8DEF0948-3F53-4DFD-99C9-D05B0E44D2BE.jpeg.3352dabcd94fd741bdac053452e5998c.jpeg

6A3AEDE0-FF53-4E3E-AE24-6974FDAD4BED.jpeg.757208f107fb52ee0108b5741431303c.jpeg

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You can’t compress a spring spanning only two coils, I have discovered! C1BBEDF4-B196-439D-ACC6-8F65E4A8E1DF.jpeg.c14e02a66faf717bcc8898da6b79aeb1.jpeg

All done, now I am happier. 

After the lift I was eye-balling the camber; at the rear it looks pretty much the same, just a little less negative camber, not quite vertical. The fronts, however, without adjusting the camber bolt from the stock position, showed real positive camber, so I wound the bolts in to maximum negative camber. I am not convinced that I am achieving the stock angle, but it looks close. On the road the handling is great.

I have discovered that three of the four struts are a little soft and have been sweating, there are none of the four helpers (just those pieces of soggy biscuit), and I should replace the front strut top hats bearings.

Well now I know what I need for my next shopping spree!

Stock, pre-lift:27780B66-FB16-4BF9-B6D4-EF794B3DBF99.jpeg.e47df869e4d699eb1d97ccc73ab75045.jpeg

Post-lift, 30mm F and R:73A5AFC0-A5C2-43A6-AD27-2F2DEC42123A.jpeg.8a4a694008879413903e8251dd73e15e.jpeg

3267036E-CB12-4A61-BEFC-9E88D53D1872.jpeg.808ff71b48d923cd67c2282440de1e48.jpeg

Edited by Mitchy

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Mitchy, are you aiming for more lift than this, or are you happy with that height? 

In the before and after pics it’s difficult to see the difference, it looks like it’s maybe an inch or two at best. The lighting unfortunately makes it hard. I do like how you’ve positioned the car on the same angle though! 

Cheers 

Bennie

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Hi Bennie

Yes its not too extreme; 32mm (1.25”) all around, but it makes for a world of difference in our situation.

We use our cars for normal road driving, and I greatly enjoy the Subaru AWD handling on our twisty roads, but there is a mile of rough track, in parts steep, from our home to civilisation. This was the initial reason we started to look for comfortable ‘family cars’ which could cope with the rough and slippery stuff! That was when I had my epiphany and discovered our trusty stalwart, the Forester.

The track is crumbly and rocky in our hot summer, muddy and slippery in our wet winter, and firm but uneven between! The little extra clearance is a necessity. The photo above, taken of the rear of the car shows a less technical part of our track.

I shall see how this setup goes, with an aim to fitting better parts and replacing the worn/missing bits in the near future.

I had to make it higher urgently and cheaply to get along our track without excessive swerving and constantly worrying about clearance.

After the lift ‘experiment’ I now see that I need three new struts due to leakage (four new struts then), plus other hardware.

I first have to decide if this lift is enough, before buying a set of replacement  struts and proper alloy lift kit.

Perhaps more logical would be to buy the full set of Outback struts, and find the necessary kit such as trailing arm brackets or spacers, and hope that the CVs will not be overworked as I do not have plans to space the subframes/diff etc.. Either way I can re-use my springs and some strut hardware. Using long OB struts without associated OB body lift parts would likely mean trouble adjusting the camber- my front bolts are maxed out already with this minor lift....

The other thing that bothers me is lifting it so much to appear non-stock or even ludicrous with the smaller Legacy (non-OB) wheels. I am presently almost at my permitted max wheel diameter- Spanish law will not permit unhomologated mods, nor more than 3% deviation in tyre diameter. It has to be within limits or be very discreet.

I have 195/70r14 rubber fitted, 2.5% larger than the standard 195/60r15.

 

Thanks!

Edited by Mitchy
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I got a moment to put on the brand new, old stock front flaps, and just as well I lifted the wheel well splash guards to look behind because there were a couple of lbs of wet sand jammed in the lower wing/sill:32641DFD-B9C3-4AB5-BE7B-6BE5F83CA35C.jpeg.3dba8a76a1bbc32a5474dee989f9b970.jpeg

Car feels lighter driving up the track now! B6FA3C08-7365-4A5C-9600-BD74CB917A07.jpeg.e80d020b8f773c86f6d8e78ec3f77de9.jpeg

And as chance would have it my long-awaited, much needed cup holder arrived today too: 2BF1CBC1-D395-4534-AF9B-92E57AA285D7.jpeg.02309af73fcc62a114a5f68de6595080.jpeg

How could this car have survived 22 years without someone installing a cup holder....? Boggled....

Lots of new-old original Scoob parts fun today!

We’re just missing a roof rack, and some proper struts, and I think that’s that! (Oh, and fix the A/C....)

Beer time.

 

Edited by Mitchy

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Is the cup holder not a standard feature? Over here I’m 99% sure this was standard across the AUDM range. 

Our Gen3 Liberty(Legacy)/Outback’s that are dual range only have one cup holder in the dashboard. The second one is removed for the dual range lever. Even the rear seats gets two fold out cup holders in the back of the console. 

That area rear of the front wheels is always an area to open up and clean out with new to you 2nd hand vehicles for the exact reason you’ve shown above! 

Cheers 

Bennie

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