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On 9/29/2019 at 8:23 AM, el_freddo said:

There are uitsyou cagey to monitor the trans too. I wouldn’t bother with the engine oil temps as the idea of the metal sensor on the head is to alert you to high temps regardless of whether or not you have coolant. 

Find an in-used bolt hole on the head and use that. 

Cheers 

Bennie

Bennie has a point here....maybe second sensor to auto trans pan or a body housing bolt? Somewhere to monitor trans temp guts. Once you monitor and test it's temp range can set a higher temp for alert?

If I had auto this would be my move. Thinking cars with oil temp monitors have sensor on tin or alloy sump close the oil. I'd go side of pan myself

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I didn’t realise how badly I typed that post! Apologies! 

Cheers 

Bennie

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On 10/16/2019 at 1:16 AM, Steptoe said:

I think the more you take a specialist sort of vehicle to either wrong specialist, or an ordinary workshop - the more you will want to learn to diagnose, fix and maintain your beast yourself.

Maybe mount the oil filter sensor to a magnet to make oil changes easier. Grease monkeys likely to not expect an oil filter sensor. Do your own oil changes now.

An overheat often kills engines and transmissions. Maybe a compression test for engine now a good starting point?

My Brat has a working AT oil sensor/alert and it never indicated an overheat of the transmission. 

Here's the current status: Transmission seems to be requiring higher revs as it gets into second and then third gear, bit it eventually does. 

By the way, what is the normal temp range wanted for the EA81, and what is the high limit temp indicating a problem/overheat (in Farenheit). 

Thanks! 

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Hmmmm....

If it helps, on my EA82 car and engine I used the TM2 on I saw 109°C , the temp needle just nudging the red zone of Subaru gauge

I was running cardboard complete coverage of radiator , following engine guru instructions to set the Sealwel magic black block - it worked sealing a source of steam that was there after a cooling system cleaner used. I then serviced heads, new genuine HG and still got steam - hence Sealwel

I never wanna see 109 but suffered no damage at that temp for just a few minutes.

Your thermostat is supposed to be fully open at its set temp - 95°C which is supposed to be the temp petrol engines are most fuel efficient.

I set my fan on at 92, off at 91

Use Google for F conversion

My auto 4WD 3 speed used to hang onto gears longer than I liked. When I converted to manual box, I found the vacuum operated do dad on the RHS if trans just above the pan - loosely threaded in and weaping fluid. Maybe check your vacuum line, connections and this do dad is not loose

Edited by Steptoe
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On 10/18/2019 at 5:15 AM, Steptoe said:

Hmmmm....

If it helps, on my EA82 car and engine I used the TM2 on I saw 109°C , the temp needle just nudging the red zone of Subaru gauge

I was running cardboard complete coverage of radiator , following engine guru instructions to set the Sealwel magic black block - it worked sealing a source of steam that was there after a cooling system cleaner used. I then serviced heads, new genuine HG and still got steam - hence Sealwel

I never wanna see 109 but suffered no damage at that temp for just a few minutes.

Your thermostat is supposed to be fully open at its set temp - 95°C which is supposed to be the temp petrol engines are most fuel efficient.

I set my fan on at 92, off at 91

Use Google for F conversion

My auto 4WD 3 speed used to hang onto gears longer than I liked. When I converted to manual box, I found the vacuum operated do dad on the RHS if trans just above the pan - loosely threaded in and weaping fluid. Maybe check your vacuum line, connections and this do dad is not loose

You were so right about the tranny! 

Went to a specialty transmission mechanic today and he quickly found the problem was a vacuum line leak! 

Runs like glass now, thanks again! 

He also figured out the trouble starting and occasional stalls are a vacuum leak around the carb gasket. 

I'm assumimg that means a carburetor pull amd new gasket? 

Anything else? 

For what its worth a 129k miles 85 Brat GL in Oregon, original owner, just sold on eBay for $8k.

Thanks! 

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On 10/18/2019 at 5:15 AM, Steptoe said:

Hmmmm....

If it helps, on my EA82 car and engine I used the TM2 on I saw 109°C , the temp needle just nudging the red zone of Subaru gauge

I was running cardboard complete coverage of radiator , following engine guru instructions to set the Sealwel magic black block - it worked sealing a source of steam that was there after a cooling system cleaner used. I then serviced heads, new genuine HG and still got steam - hence Sealwel

I never wanna see 109 but suffered no damage at that temp for just a few minutes.

Your thermostat is supposed to be fully open at its set temp - 95°C which is supposed to be the temp petrol engines are most fuel efficient.

I set my fan on at 92, off at 91

Use Google for F conversion

My auto 4WD 3 speed used to hang onto gears longer than I liked. When I converted to manual box, I found the vacuum operated do dad on the RHS if trans just above the pan - loosely threaded in and weaping fluid. Maybe check your vacuum line, connections and this do dad is not loose

You were so right about the tranny! 

Went to a specialty transmission mechanic today and he quickly found the problem was a vacuum line leak! 

Runs like glass now, thanks again! 

He also figured out the trouble starting and occasional stalls are a vacuum leak around the carb gasket. 

I'm assumimg that means a carburetor pull amd new gasket? 

Anything else? 

For what its worth a 129k miles 85 Brat GL in Oregon, original owner, just sold on eBay for $8k.

Thanks! 

I have a chance fo get the entire intake manifold and everything on it including the carb. 

Would this be a good way to go? 

Thanks! 

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Spare parts are always good to collect.  Every day, more parts go NLA. 

Don't even try to remove the intake manifold bolts without running the engine up to normal operating temperature first, then CAREFULLY loosen them while it's hot.

If the transmission is a 3AT, the oil pump drive shaft is a failure point to watch for over 200K miles.   When the splines strip out, you have NO engine power to the wheels.  After I bought mine 5 years ago, there were 4 left in stock in the USA.

 

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Good news on the auto fix :- but we give out this help for you to tackle the problem at home on your own. Speaking for myself, some of us are cheapskates :)

On the spare carb, if its donor is month and year match to yours it will likely be the same. Six months either way and it could differ enough to be an awkward straight swap. Check its features and freckles to see if it is same or different

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Yes. Run it sans thermostat please.

And it is EA81 we are discussing.....the metal tube coming from rear RHS of inlet manifold to heater hose through firewall ...with engine cold so no scalding, pull hose off tube and run engine to see how good water flow is from pipe towards heater - good pump flow test I have found. Best done with just tap, tank, pond or stream water than heavy metal laden coolant

Rubber hoses are easier removed from metal tube with heat gun heat :)

Edited by Steptoe

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On 8/23/2019 at 1:55 PM, divinicus said:

Ok, I ordered an original E81 thermostat and housing for it, just have to get a gasket. Just ran the engine and did a boilover teat for about ten minutes, nothing came out of the overflow tube. Will replace the thermostat and do the flow test to see if this radiator is clogged. Don't mind throwing some more money in with a new radiator, but I have a lot of trouble believing the hgs are toast with only 130k miles. 

Milage doesn't mean much when a car is this old! My '83 wagon had a blown HG when I bought it, and it's only at 100k miles! It depends on how the car was treated and what it's been up to for the last nearly 40 years.

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