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Skyman44

JDM EJ205 oil cooler hole?

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So there's this hex stopper where a hose needs to go if I were to put in an oil cooler. I have one from my stock usdm engine that I'm trying to swap over but the stopper requires a 14mm hex to take it off it seems but when I went to take it off it stripped and is practically a circle now. I've been looking online to find a solution or a lm extraction tool to take it out but haven't been able to find the right size. Help?

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4 hours ago, Skyman44 said:

So there's this hex stopper where a hose needs to go if I were to put in an oil cooler. I have one from my stock usdm engine that I'm trying to swap over but the stopper requires a 14mm hex to take it off it seems but when I went to take it off it stripped and is practically a circle now. I've been looking online to find a solution or a lm extraction tool to take it out but haven't been able to find the right size. Help?

Oh wow that’s rough.  Drill it out.  Dremel.

Heating with a torch might help but don’t heat the block too much.  

An alternate solution if you think it’ll be hard to remove is to drill a hole, tap it, and thread a nipple the same size as the cooler hose.  Not sure where you’d find an appropriate nipple with threads.   Could potentially make your own with a die. 

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could be a good application for those Irwin extraction tools. Or do as suggested above, but use a left-hand drill(s) - sometimes the warmth and vibration will spin the plug out leaving the threads in the block OK.

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40 minutes ago, 1 Lucky Texan said:

could be a good application for those Irwin extraction tools. Or do as suggested above, but use a left-hand drill(s) - sometimes the warmth and vibration will spin the plug out leaving the threads in the block OK.

those are the ticket. Machinist grade left handed drill bit. Try to keep oil on the cutting tip of the bit. Anything to help disperse heat and lubricate as odd as that sounds for cutting. I grab whatever ATF or power steering fluid on the shelf I’ll never need and use that. 

I wasn’t thinking though - That plug is huge. Drill bit might not be my first pick. it’s not likely going to work. It’ll just drill a hole.  Ideally you want the bit to be just under the diameter of the fastener to maximize heat and torque. I doubt you’ll have a bit that big and end up just drilling a hole.  I think this will be more of a - drill 21 different holes until it falls to pieces scenario.

impact would be ideal.  Cut a V shape into the side of the rounded out hex of the plug.  Get a cold chisel and wail on the side of that V in the “loosening” direction.  (Make your V so it allows this loosening impact to be as Much in the loosening direction as possible).  Pound with a heavy hammer.

Ive done this numerous times and the “impact” is extremely helpful to loosen stuff like this. I nearly guarantee it’ll work BUT i don’t know if it’ll damage anything else close to the block in that area.  I don’t think there’s anything sticking out or vulnerable to impact or leverage there but I’d rather see what you’re working with first before saying. 

I would avoid removal tools at all costs. I don’t even own them anymore.  I threw them all away.  They’re great tools for low grade bicycles or house work, and in a machine shop with controlled perpendicular application of forces, no impact at all.  That’s just not practical in difficult motor or rusty car work and they’re prone to break.

Anything that comes off with one of those extractors I guarantee it’ll come out with drilling, chiseling or another method.  If extractors break - which they often do in at home engine or rusty car work - then you can be in a world of annoyance removing those hardened broken tools.

 

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If that plug is steel, tap a 5/8-11 hex nut on it then weld them together with a MIG, or arc + 7014 rod.

Not a lot of weld bead, just enough to make it stick.

Let cool then try unscrewing the plug.

 

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4 hours ago, czny said:

If that plug is steel, tap a 5/8-11 hex nut on it then weld them together with a MIG, or arc + 7014 rod.

Not a lot of weld bead, just enough to make it stick.

Let cool then try unscrewing the plug.

 

Crack I forgot this - yes, this is the way to remove this.

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You mentioned it's coming off your usdm engine and not new.  If the old engine had any bearing or piston issues, chances are high the cooler's already contaminated.  Look more closely into reusing the cooler and decide for yourself.

FWIW, I'm not running any factory oil cooler on my EJ257 swapped car.  It's been at least 8 years now.  No heat issues if you're worried about that.

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