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Guest Rooinater

Offroad tires for the subaru. small write up, suby 4x4 tires

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Couldn't some of the info be compiled and/or edited, then put into the USRM? I agree that it's valuable information that should be kept and not forgotten.

 

Just my 2¢ !

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I know it's and old topic, but i guess my question is related to it.

So i own an EA81 hatch, 4 speed with d/r. I'm about to lift it with 4" in a few months and I'm in a big dilema about the tyre syze....

It's not gonna be a daily driver, 90% offroad and highways. The tyres that i'm thinking about are: 195/80/15, 205/75/15 or 215/75/15 (other suggestions?). I am looking for 15" because they are a lot easier (cheaper) to find in where i live (Bulgaria) Am i gonna be OK with them? I mean the engine is bone stock for now (hitachi carb, stock exhaust...) am I going to lose too much power and low end or it will be OK, with the low range gears? Are there going to be any other problems with the reliability of the car?

I'll be happy with any info about the subject or if you link me to a similar topic in the forum. :)

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Read around.There are a bunch of threads on this specific subject.It has to be the most asked question out there.

In a nut shell.It has been done with way larger tires than you are considering.You'll be fine.

cheers

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bulk, I ran 205/75/14"s on my 86 GL carb OHC engine and I still managed 80 on the highway and mileage around 20 or so.

 

Keep in mind though I was was running a 5 speed.   That 4 speed with big tires is gonna damn near lug out the engine when you shift from 2 to 3 unless ur @ redline in second.    The way around it is you use 4 Lo to start out in, once you've ran through those gears you goto 4 hi and then use those 4 gears.  

 

the EA81 is a tough little underpowered engine, but they last FOREVER.  pushrods so you have reliability on your side.  The bad side of that style of car lies almost 100% in the tranny.   With a 5 speed D/R in it, it'd be one hell of a road

 

Its all gonna come down to gearing unless you repower to a 2.2L or a 2.5L.   I'm turning 29"s on my OB with a 2.5L 4.11 gearing AWD gear box and it drives just fine, actually accelerates better than it did stock.  Mileage ~20 mpg

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I had 29x8.50 r14 super swamped tsl's for a long time and they killed every terrain I went through but they die quick on the road. I am now running a set of 27x8.50 r14 maxxis big horns which suck on all terrain types except pavement which they do great on, low noise, great wear life but I work at Timberline on mount hood and do a lot of snow driving and I am not impressed at all with them.

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I had 29x8.50 r14 super swamped tsl's for a long time and they killed every terrain I went through but they die quick on the road. I am now running a set of 27x8.50 r14 maxxis big horns which suck on all terrain types except pavement which they do great on, low noise, great wear life but I work at Timberline on mount hood and do a lot of snow driving and I am not impressed at all with them.

 

I've got the bighorns, and they work great.  Mud, rocks, deep snow.

 

I will say that if the snow is deep, you must air down and creep.  The agressive paddles will just scoop out snow like a shovel and bury you quick if you are fully aired up and spinning out alot.

 

For deep snow, air down to about 14psi, and DON"T SPIN THE TIRES.  Creep.

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For deep snow I air down alot less than that.On my hatch 15 PSI is my highway pressure so in deep snow I run down into the low single digits.Those are on 31x10.5x15 tires so they might have more plys than normal.

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I have driven in snow many times since I work in the snow and 14 to 18 psi is my hi way pressure as well but the only other mud tide I have had is a tsl so it isn't a fair comparison between the two to be honest. Originally I had not planned on driving this car daily but circumstances changed so I needed a more road friendly tire which big horns do great. They wear great and even and are not loud at all but not my cup of tea for the conditions higher in the hills for snow. Maybe I will try those mud claws smackvt was talking about.

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You guys are nuts.

 

15 psi at 60 mph in a lifted subaru? 

 

That's just dumb.  Need to swerve suddenly?  Popped bead, rolled over......well you see where this could lead.

 

That's REALLY bad advice.

 

 

Now I will agree that airing down lower will help even more in the snow, in my experience, going lower than 14 psi on our relatively small tires (even us big guys) is risking bead seapage, and a flat tire within about 2-3 hours wheeling.  Then the bead pops, and your screwed.  (unless you've got a healthy air source or some starting fluid)

 

Airing down to 14 is resoanble, and you can air back up with a cheapy cigarette lighter pump.  Slowly :(

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I just leave them aired down in the winter because my car only goes from home to work and back then we drive my wifes car if we go anywhere different. It is a pain to air up and down when going to work at 4 in the morning when the road crews have not plowed much and i have to drive 6 miles up Timberline road in three feet of snow. I work early and leave late so I dont encounter too many high manuver situations and it has worked out this far.

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