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WJM

why should you carry spares?

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So you dont end up like WJM.

 

One of my accsessory belts broke on I285 today...and took the other one with it on the way out. Both stayed in the engine bay ironically.

 

However, the engine overheated near instantly, as the EA82 uses those belts to drive the waterpump.

 

After a long walk to NAPA...suprisingly they had belts...some basic tools, coolant and no more money left for the week later...the car should run and get me home.

 

Nope.

 

Belts on, coolant in....coolant vapor out of the exhaust. I drove it enough to get it off the interstate and in a 'safe' location...Now I am going to spend the last $ i have on getting it towed over to my place....so I can drive the other broken car until i get another engine put together for the RX.

 

 

Now...the RX AND the Outback will be completely loaded with their own sets of tools, spares and liquids.

 

An expensive lesson I still have not fully learned...No more. Full paranoia mode set to 'FULLY ACTIVE'

 

 

IBvaderkilledbenandejenginesarebetter

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wow, is it just me, or does that damn black cloud never seem to go away while your around?

 

 

 

~Josh~

 

 

 

IByesejenginesarewaybetter

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yeah that's why I carry around 100lbs of spare parts + tools :horse:

 

Yay! I'm not a nerd! :banana: I get crap all the time about all the spares/tools/fluids I have in the tool boxes/in bed of my brat ... I just make it sound like I want to have the extra weight in the back for tracktion :D

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I think of it like carrying an umbrella--I've never had anything major happen since I started carrying around tools, spares, etc.

 

+1

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Keep a close eye on your gauges too, scanning every few seconds. When my accessory belt broke, I caught it before the temp gauge was even 3/4 of the way up, no damage done. I also noticed the voltage gauge drop at the same time.

 

I've learned to treat these cars with kid gloves when something goes wrong, so whenever I get any abnormal reading on the gauges, I check it out. Better safe than sorry. One minor problem can spiral into a disaster if you don't catch it fast enough...

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Gauges matter. Scan them. Regularly.

 

I've stopped before because the temperature gauge was too low on the highway. I think my thermostat is sticking a bit, but it was maybe 10-15 degrees below where it should be.

 

No offense, but you should catch a broken accessory belt immediately, due to the alternator failure. All the idiot lights go on, the voltmeter drops, etc.

 

I try to carry spares of important things with me, as well as a tool kit customized to each car (I need to finish setting up the permanent kits).

 

-=Russ=-

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ummm, i did catch it immediatly.

 

however, going 90mph in the far left lane in atlanta traffic means I am 6 lanes from the 'emergancy lane'

 

which means when it breaks, its too late anyways.

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I know where you can get a spare, uh, car. And a set of slicks only mounted on the RX once.

 

 

glad you weren't in the wrong part of Atlanta. Jay

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ummm, i did catch it immediatly.

 

however, going 90mph in the far left lane in atlanta traffic means I am 6 lanes from the 'emergancy lane'

 

which means when it breaks, its too late anyways.

 

Aah...

 

I totally forgot there are parts of the country where you can't be stopped on the side of the road in 15 seconds or so. :-)

 

-=Russ=-

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Around here there are sections of highway that do not have shoulders at all - in fact the road slopes down sharply from the edge of the lane into the ditch. To make matters worse, 50% of the traffic is heavy rigs, some carrying oilfield parts large enough to drive my car though. Fun in the winter.

 

I found an amazing little emergency toolkit at Crappy Tire. I bought one for each car and keep it in the trunk. Includes the usual tools, but also hacksaw, flashlight, roll of tape, test light, bit of mechanics wire, most of the stuff needed to bodge a repair on the side of the road (where there is a "side"). Saved my butt several times already. Good kit to take yarding too.

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