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I don't know what the E.J. 25 engine is, but on my 2.2 I have been able to get crank pulley off several times with out any special tools. Just catch it at 9:00 and 3:00 and wiggle in and out while pulling straight back.

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if it is a manual, you can put it in 5th and have somebody step on the brakes to break the bolt loose. if it is automatic, you can search the archives. many people have posted solutions for how to stop the crank from turning while removing the bolt.

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If the crank bolt doesn't loosen:

 

If required I put a 18" long steelpipe on my 1/2 breaker bar, pull hard and strike it with a rubber mallet. Usually works in two or three blows. The crank bolt is 22mm BTW.

 

Some mechanics jam the breaker bar against the chasis and crank the engine. I don't like this technique....

 

Be sure to use thread lock and a torque wrench to reinstall the crank bolt. They have a habit of working themselves loose, which can destroy the crank seal and oil pump, and in some cases the crankshaft.

 

Off hand I can't remember the correct torque. Can someone provide it?

 

If the pulley wont come off:

 

It has most likely rotated over the crankshaft key. You might need to use a chain wrench (wrap the pulley with a rag to prevent damage), or use a rubber strap wrench. Rotate the pulley clockwise to remove (the direction of crankshaft rotation).

 

Spraying liquid wrench into the crank bolt area can help as well.

 

You will need a new crankshaft key, and most likely a new pulley as well. Inspect the pulley carfully verifying that the notch matches the crank key width.

 

I replace the crank key everytime I remove the crank pulley (you are supposed to do this) and have never needed much effort to remove the crank pulley since starting this practice.

 

Most of the time the crank pulley "overrides" the crank key when the crank bolt is loose. Never just retighten a loose crank bolt, always remove and inspect the pulley and crank key, as a little driving with a loose crank belt will damage both. Just retightening the bolt can jam the pulley on the crank.

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I use a chain wrench, but you have to be careful, the chain wrench can do a number on the pulley. Take some old belts and cut them to length and electrical tape them on the pulley first. Pipes for the breaker bar and chain wrench make things much easier.

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There is an inspection plug on the top passenger side of the trans to engine bellhousing. Remove the plug and use something long to wedge and hold the flywheel or torque converter(manual or auto) this will let you remove the bolt easily. Do the same when installing since the bolt needs to go somewhere around 130 ft lbs.

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Chain ViseGrip. Nice inexpensive little tool. Protect the pulley with a piece of old belt, jam the Grip on the pulley and let the handle rest on the alt support. Voilà. You then have both hands free. One pushing on the breaker bar and the othe holding your beer.

I also use it to remove the cam sprokets. Same procedure. The handle also catches on something freeing your hands but I dont remember exactly on what.

Good luck!

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Harbor Freight sells a really good chain wrench, it is much bigger than the chain vise grips and it only cost around 20.00 dollars. Most manual's call for around 90 to 100 ft. pounds of torque on the crank bolt. (however people here totally disagree with this) they claim you need around 120.

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Thanks for all the tips guys ! I got it off.

 

The engine is on an engine stand in my garage, so I could not use the cranking, or transmission-lock method.

 

First I bought a strap wrench, which broke :(

 

Then I picked up a chainwrench, and used the strap from the busted strapwrench to protect the pulley.

 

I used a piece of 2x4 to hold the wrench against the alternator stand. Initially I wasn't paying attention and the 2x4 was against the timing belt cover, which broke :madder:

 

Then I used the lever of my jack to turn the socket and voila !

 

Thanks again...on to taking the heads off.

 

Rob.

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Originally posted by BoxersOnly

I used a piece of 2x4 to hold the wrench against the alternator stand. Initially I wasn't paying attention and the 2x4 was against the timing belt cover, which broke :madder:

 

Rob.

 

The timing belt covers can be repaired with epoxy, or with fibreglass if required.

 

Just be sure to clean the cover with grease remover, and then wire brush the area light to provide a good surface for the epoxy to bond to.

 

Before you put it back together I recommend that you remove and inspect the crankshaft key (half circle of hardened metal which locks the pulley from freespinning). Compare the width of the key and the pulley to ensure that there is no slack. If any slack replace the key and the pulley if required. Read my earlier post regarding what can happen if the pulley comes loose.

 

If your removal problem was taking the crank bolt out your pulley and key are most likely ok.

 

Be sure to use anti-seize on all bolts such as timing cover bolts, and to use threadlock on some bolts such as the timing belt tensioner.

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I use this method to remove the bolt (I used the alternator/PS belt, but had to use some additional force from a philips screwdriver in pushing the belt under itself to make sure there was enough force on that part of the belt that was sliding under so it wouldn't just slip - because that belt's a little shorter than the ideal length for this use)-

 

You can also try this if you don't have a belt handy  -

 

Then, if the pulley itself doesn't want to come right off, strike it with a rubber mallet until it comes loose (never use anything harder or you can damage the pulley). Depending upon how long the pulley has been there and/or how corroded it may be, you may need to spray a little WD40 around the inside lip (where the bolt was, let it sit a few minutes and then try the rubber mallet.

 

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