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good shape, good axles, hg replaced, everything works including ac, but over 200,000mi on it , owner says hi way miles, can buy it fairly cheap, any opinions? kelly blue book still list it pretty high ,thanks

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Listen to the engine carefully for rod knock. At 200,000 if the HG goes its just age not design fault.

Make sure the tires match, inspect the fluids, drive the car in figure 8's to check for torque bind.

How much they asking

 

nipper

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1500 dollars , it's pretty close to me , wondering if the heads were replaced or just the gasket, the tires are all the same, timing belt changed, newer brakes, no keyless remote ,the headgasket was replaced about a year ago+ new water pump + exhaust,

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Highly unlikely that the heads themselves would have been replaced. Ask to see the work order.

 

I'm at 528,000 km (~325,000 miles) now on my 97 OB. New block back at roughly half that, but one head is still original. Original tranny (except for the clutch pack), original power steering, A/C, radiator, exhaust... Struts all replaced a few years ago. Check the CV boots as I have had both fronts go in the past year (inside ones as I recall).

 

Heed nipper's advice on checking for torque bind and "piston slap" that doesn't go away, as that could be rod noise.

 

The rest of my car is good. Body (annual Rust Check spray), interior (but I'm sole driver 98% of the time), etc.

 

Some little things you may have to deal with. Climate control backlighting. Rusty plate behind hatch latch. Hatch struts are probably weak by now (I changed mine last year). Yellow / foggy headlight lenses. Starter contacts (although I've never touched mine, knock wood). Check wheel bearings (I've had a couple of rears go). See how the car reacts when you start off "very" slowly, feathering the gas. That is, if there is any hesitation. If you get a dead spot around 3000 rpm, that could be knock sensor. Probably more I could think of, but given the age of the car, one has to expect certain things. Oh, make sure the crank pulley isn't wobbling.

 

I like my car (just past 10 yr old) and hope it keeps running for some time yet.

 

Commuter

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should be fine. at 200,000 my biggest concern would be the timing pulleys. they are not as smooth as new...eventually they start killing timing belts and this is an interference engine. i'd want new ones with that many miles.

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Should be getting ready for it's 3rd timing belt, maybe? 105,000 and 210,000, IIRC. I had my pulleys replaced when they replaced the T-belt, it added a couple hundred onto the total but if it keeps the car in good running shape for another 100k miles, it was worth it (hell, $300 is just one average car payment, right?)

 

Good to hear that these cars can last this long. I just turned over 120k on mine and need to keep it at least another year. The only other car I've ever owned for this many miles was a 1990 Mitsubishi Montero that I bought in 1992 with 18,000 miles and sold in 1999 with 145,000. I'm hoping to beat that record with the Outback (1999 model, bought with 42k in 2003.) :banana:

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Should be getting ready for it's 3rd timing belt, maybe? 105,000 and 210,000, IIRC. I had my pulleys replaced when they replaced the T-belt, it added a couple hundred onto the total but if it keeps the car in good running shape for another 100k miles, it was worth it (hell, $300 is just one average car payment, right?)

 

Good to hear that these cars can last this long. I just turned over 120k on mine and need to keep it at least another year. The only other car I've ever owned for this many miles was a 1990 Mitsubishi Montero that I bought in 1992 with 18,000 miles and sold in 1999 with 145,000. I'm hoping to beat that record with the Outback (1999 model, bought with 42k in 2003.) :banana:

 

Ahh, yours is still a baby at this point! My '96 OBW is going to turn over 230,000 miles sometime this week - guess by Commuter's standards, mine is merely a teenager! :clap:

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Ahh, yours is still a baby at this point! My '96 OBW is going to turn over 230,000 miles sometime this week - guess by Commuter's standards, mine is merely a teenager! :clap:

 

Mine is born again with a new engine aand 201,000 miles.

 

nipper

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Yeti and Nipper: Why were your engines replaced? Was there a major failure or does it just get to the point where, after a certain number of miles, so many things need replacing or repairing that it's more cost effective to just replace the whole thing with a remanufactured one?

 

And what are the costs on a remanufactured engine? Assuming I don't have the skills to put it in myself (I don't, nor do I have the tools or the space) what would it run me, about $2500?

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Yeti and Nipper: Why were your engines replaced? Was there a major failure or does it just get to the point where, after a certain number of miles, so many things need replacing or repairing that it's more cost effective to just replace the whole thing with a remanufactured one?

 

And what are the costs on a remanufactured engine? Assuming I don't have the skills to put it in myself (I don't, nor do I have the tools or the space) what would it run me, about $2500?

 

Blu threw a rod at about 4700 RPM climbing a pass in california. There was a huge hole in the block.

I paid a lot of money for a new engine, but i also told them i didnt want to open the hood except for fluid changes till the next timing belt. So alot of hoses were replaced and other things.

 

nipper

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I replaced mine due to a blown head gasket. I did not have the skills to replace the Head Gasket but I did have the skills to replace the engine. I used a 120 peice tool set from Costco, impact wrench and a borrowed cherry picker. From what I have learned I could probably do a head gasket on a 2.2 if I had to now.:cool:

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The head gaskets blew on the old 2.5 at 192k, so I went out, found the parts I wanted to use. After everything was collected, I took the pieces to CCR and had them build a new 2.5 motor :)

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And what are the costs on a remanufactured engine? Assuming I don't have the skills to put it in myself (I don't, nor do I have the tools or the space) what would it run me, about $2500?
go with CCR for any new engines. an alternate and cost effective solution is to swap a used low-mileage 2.2...lots of info in other threads about this, no need to rehash here, but those are your best options.

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And what are the costs on a remanufactured engine? Assuming I don't have the skills to put it in myself (I don't, nor do I have the tools or the space) what would it run me, about $2500?

 

I replaced the engine in my '99 Outback a month ago, at 118K miles. One of the camshafts siezed. It had horrible piston slap (maybe it was really rod knock?), so I decided to get a rebuilt from CCR.

 

Your $2500 estimate is a bit low - the 2.5 DOHC is a very expensive engine. Call CCR for a quote. Ask for the USMB discount. Since you are in Colorado, you'll pay less for shipping, or maybe you can go pick it up. If you can't install it yourself, figure 10 hours of labor for a shop to do it.

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owner says when it is well below zero -10 -15 ,the engine will tick for afew minutes and then go away ,

 

Thats normal. The block heater will be your freind.

 

nipper

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Any make of car at that mileage will start to nickel and dime you. I wouldn't buy a car like that unless you know how to turn a wrench or you have a high tolerance for paying someone to do it for you. If you want to own cars in this price range learning to do it yourself is a good idea. The USMB can go a long way toward teaching you what you need to know.

 

Our '99, which we bought new, is at something like 210-215k miles, impossible to say due to 2 years of intermittent speedometer. I just did the timing belt for the second time, and I did the head gasket at 118k. The engine has been really solid overall, we just took it to Indiana and back and I beat the tar out of it, like I always do. The engine needs to come out soon, it needs two new timing belt idlers and a new tensioner, I should probably replace the water pump again, valve adjustment, rear main seal, and the oil pan is leaking due to rust. I'm also planning to finally do the front struts, they're getting a little soft.

 

I hope to get another 2 years out of this car, my wife has already started in with the I'm tired of my car BS. She wants a minivan, still hoping for a turbo forester or outback.

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Ditto what 99obw said about DIY car repairs, or be willing to pay for it. This is true for any high mileage car. Just keep repeating to yourself "It's cheaper than a brand new one" as you fork over the dough.

 

I hope to get another 2 years out of this car, my wife has already started in with the I'm tired of my car BS. She wants a minivan, still hoping for a turbo forester or outback.

 

Just get her what she wants. You will be happier. Trust me on this one, I learned the hard way.

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Just get her what she wants. You will be happier. Trust me on this one, I learned the hard way.

 

I hear you, the key is subtly convincing her that she wants another suby.

 

Not helping my case is the fact that she just rode in her friend's new Toyota Sienna AWD. I really hate every aspect of minivans, driving them, putting gas in them, and especially working on them.

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I hear you, the key is subtly convincing her that she wants another suby.

 

Not helping my case is the fact that she just rode in her friend's new Toyota Sienna AWD. I really hate every aspect of minivans, driving them, putting gas in them, and especially working on them.

almost any car that is newer and in better shape than the one you are driving is "better" than what you have . for starters it's different, no problems. it's newer, newer snacks and options, some of which weren't available when your car was made. and lastly , it's cleaner so it will sell!!! show her a newer, cleaner subaru with more snacks, that you are willing to buy, and she might just fal in love with it.

 

don't forget to spray some of that "new car smell" in it just before you take her for the test drive.

 

my wife swore she would never buy a mini-van, until she drove one. there is lots of room, easy to drive , you sit up high and can see..... but they break down, they don't last, and they really are pretty much a truck. as a matter of fact, most classifides list the m with trucks.

 

so ask you beautiful bride, "just which truck do you want honey?" then take her for a ride in the legacy GT with the cd changer & sun roof . oh yeah, don't forgert the flowers and champaign.

 

A NEW CAR !!!!!!

YOU'RE THE BEST HUSBAND IN THE WHOLE WORLD!!!!!

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