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What Have You Done to your Soobie lately? (Please post in here and keep it going)

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It is interesting to see what variations of cars turn up in different places. Wonder if a turbo wagon in Kenya could be one left behind by the factory Subaru team when doing the African WRC in the late 80s/early 90s?

 

Good to see another Touring Wagon saved :clap:

 

Thanks Wagonist!  :clap:

 

Not the case. My dad in law bought it from someone who'd just imported it in 1993/4, I saw potential in it hence bought it from him recently as he was contemplating disposing it. It wasn't in use a lot lately, he'd drive it ooonnce in a long while. Has a few issues (Over heating & TOD) but with a perfect interior, everything electronic working, accident free body (just faded paint & minor dents). 

 

This 1800 ST Touring Wagon model is kinda rare here so Im gonna do my best to restore and preserve it. 

 

Is  the red stripe trim a turbo thing also?

 

Out of all the wagons i've seen this side, mine's the only one with the red stripe trim.... found it interesting. I'd really want to know more about the history/specs of the 1800 ST wagons. Pros and cons etc.

 

Is there anyone who's ever put up info about it? I've Googled it up and I didn't get much on it. Was there any difference between the 1800T & 1800ST?

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Is the red stripe trim a turbo thing also?

If i remember correctly my na ea82 engined leone had red stripes in it. But for sure I know my parted out wagon had golden color stripes in it.

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We never got any turbo wagons here, so can't give you any advice about what was supposed to be the side strips.

GL & RX here got the chrome strip. DLs got no strip, or sometimes a green one.

I did a turbo conversion from a JDM halfcut 15 years ago & I think I remember it being red.

 

I'm curious about the ST & T model designations.

We only got DL, GL, RX

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My red 84 wagon is ST, I thought that was just the code for touring wagon, Its ea82 non turbo.

Tom

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Today I found that the horrible sound coming from my right front wheel, was, as I suspected, NOT my bearings, as a couple of service outlets had claimed. The axle nut was not torqued on enough due to a small problem near the end of the spindle.

Once that was dealt with, the fix took less than 5 minutes, requireing the extremely technical operation of applying the socket and breaker bar to the axle nut, standing on the breaker bar, and jumping up and down on it a bit to tighten it up more , lol.

Technically, it required about 165 pounds of torque, plus a little due to the original problem with the threads, so at approx. 260 Lbs I think I was able to tighten it up REAL GOOD! lol... Problem fixed.

 

Got an estimate for a much needed 'adjustments only' tune up for only $30.00, which sounds great to me, but the mechanic, a local subaru man, has a lot of business and I am having trouble matching my time to bring the Brat in with his available times to do the work.

 

I could use suggestions for an available Subaru-worthy mechanic in the Medford/Ashland Oregon area, especially if they are available Fridays through Sundays some time...

Edited by Subaruist

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Well, not to nit pick, but technically it WAS the bearings BECAUSE the nut was loose. ....jussayin'

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Well, not to nit pick, but technically it WAS the bearings BECAUSE the nut was loose. ....jussayin'

 

LOL... Well I could say that actually it was the Axle because the nut was loose, or that it was the nut because the axle threads had a problem, or that...

 

In any case, yes, the bearings will have to be replaced anyway, because I did see rust on the bearing balls, - and also, being that certain mechanics insist on turning the rotors if doing the brakes, and as a result charge almost twice as much. I would rather buy new rotors because they only cost just over $20.00,  so in the end, piece by piece, I will in time be replacing a good many of the parts on my beloved Brat, - but you know what?....

Its so worth it.

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I took my old EA82T block apart and found the reason for thick smoke cloud behind my old leone:

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/3bfdq51emivdkhb/2014-10-30%2012.42.31.jpg?dl=0

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/virji25yantmq44/2014-10-30%2012.41.45.jpg?dl=0

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/z73vp2stfpya805/2014-10-30%2012.41.24.jpg?dl=0

 

Also found out that in my other supposed to be ok block the last owner had installed one different kind of piston in it. So now I have 

two blocks and no good set of pistons to put in neither of them. The othre block has lower skirted pistons and the other has those that are in the pictures (last owner mixed them together in one of the blocks). Happily I never did build that block to working condition.

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Treasure !!! Piece by piece my fiendish plot is coming to fruition !!!

At my beloved scrap yard I have found another key component to making my Brat ever more wonderful !

As I have mentioned in pervious times, I have wanted to install a secondary fuel tank across the bed, either even with, or just ahead of the wheels/wheel wells.

I did not expect this to be easy. In fact, most or all vehicle fuel tanks would have been made of steel, would have ben odd-shaped, and difficult to mount, even if I found a vertically mounted tank. The other options were to either fabricate one myself, which would be difficult, time consuming, and expensive, or to have one made, which was not necessarily a better option either, or to hope to findsomething at the scrap yard, which until today had not happened.

 

The funny thing about this scrap yard is that when I go there, I usually do not find what I am looking for, but instead find something completely different that is a monumental treasure! I needed 3" by 3" by 1/8" thick aluminum  angle to start my Deck/Bed cover. Can't get it.

While I was going back and forth, looking and looking again, I spied something odd looking... could it be some kind of container or tank?

Yes! It turned out to be an aluminum gas tank for a boat! It was almost the perfect shape and size, and ready for fittings!

I asked how much, it would be either $2 or $3 a pound, I hoped and wished, and it was quoted as $2 a pund, for a totalof just over $42.00 !!!

I bought it !!!


It is aluminum, good for weight, It is almost rectangular and fairly easy to mount, and at 20 gallons possible capacity, it more than doubles my maximum driving distance before needing more gas!!! Just what I needed!!!

 

I just need to find out what kind of sending unit I need to get for it, and how to add an actual fill port. There are also a couple of threaded stubby post holes that look like they are threaded for 1/2" pipe or something...

 

Pics:

SAM_2194_zpsc2e743a2.jpg

SAM_2197_zps5b51d985.jpg

SAM_2201_zps4098dda8.jpg

 

Finding the proper sending unit may be a daunting task....

 

But I found pretty much just what I need!

 

I so happy !!!

Edited by Subaruist
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Fixed my central locking after not running the fronts through the original wiring grommets, wires split, all fixed and hopefully wont happen again.

sand blasted and bent the backing plates I got for rear discs back into shape at work, then gave them, some paint.

After sand blasting
http://puu.sh/cytvF/536385fa1a.jpg

Couple of coats of primer
http://puu.sh/cytu3/2ac6d7fb96.jpg

and after some paint
http://puu.sh/cytto/289813de24.jpg

Just have to borrow a torque wrench from work to put them on
and I'll have some nice braking. Should be good.

Tom
 

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...I'm curious about the ST & T model designations.

We only got DL, GL, RX

 

Beside DL, GL, RS (imported from USA), RX (Especial Order from Japan)

 

The GT was the Luxury Turbo Wagon (Equal to GL-10 in USA), and

 

the ST was the Luxury Turbo Touring Wagon.

 

On the EA82 we also had GTi in Latin America, for Coupes:

 

 

10294265_705543202825044_761538034368986

 

Kind Regards.

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I took my old EA82T block apart and found the reason for thick smoke cloud behind my old leone...

 

That is a Disaster for sure... 

 

What could caused such damage?

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...sand blasted and bent the backing plates I got for rear discs back into shape at work, then gave them, some paint...

 

That Machine Orange, is Ceramic Paint for High Temps?

 

... or only anti-Rust paint?

 

Kind Regards.

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That Machine Orange, is Ceramic Paint for High Temps?

 

... or only anti-Rust paint?

 

Kind Regards.

Its high temperature, wasn't sure if it was needed but thought I would be safe.

 

Tom

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last weekend, changed the oil and filter,,I changed the Timing belt and pulleys in my WRX - first time doing that, I THINK my tensioner has been weak because, the 'chk' noise I heard whenever the a/c compressor came on is now gone!, this weekend, changed the oil/filter in the wife's OBW and finally got those prothane transverse links out. Put Febest aftermarkets in. No more bone-shaking when going over concrete road transitions!

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Treasure !!! Piece by piece my fiendish plot is coming to fruition !!!

At my beloved scrap yard I have found another key component to making my Brat ever more wonderful !

As I have mentioned in pervious times, I have wanted to install a secondary fuel tank across the bed, either even with, or just ahead of the wheels/wheel wells.

I did not expect this to be easy. In fact, most or all vehicle fuel tanks would have been made of steel, would have ben odd-shaped, and difficult to mount, even if I found a vertically mounted tank. The other options were to either fabricate one myself, which would be difficult, time consuming, and expensive, or to have one made, which was not necessarily a better option either, or to hope to findsomething at the scrap yard, which until today had not happened.

 

The funny thing about this scrap yard is that when I go there, I usually do not find what I am looking for, but instead find something completely different that is a monumental treasure! I needed 3" by 3" by 1/8" thick aluminum  angle to start my Deck/Bed cover. Can't get it.

While I was going back and forth, looking and looking again, I spied something odd looking... could it be some kind of container or tank?

Yes! It turned out to be an aluminum gas tank for a boat! It was almost the perfect shape and size, and ready for fittings!

I asked how much, it would be either $2 or $3 a pound, I hoped and wished, and it was quoted as $2 a pund, for a totalof just over $42.00 !!!

I bought it !!!

 

It is aluminum, good for weight, It is almost rectangular and fairly easy to mount, and at 20 gallons possible capacity, it more than doubles my maximum driving distance before needing more gas!!! Just what I needed!!!

 

I just need to find out what kind of sending unit I need to get for it, and how to add an actual fill port. There are also a couple of threaded stubby post holes that look like they are threaded for 1/2" pipe or something...

 

Pics:

SAM_2194_zpsc2e743a2.jpg

SAM_2197_zps5b51d985.jpg

SAM_2201_zps4098dda8.jpg

 

Finding the proper sending unit may be a daunting task....

 

But I found pretty much just what I need!

 

I so happy !!!

 

Why need a fuel sender?

Why not plumb the outlet of this tank into the fuel filler nozzle with a valve (some kind of agricultural fitting), then when you see your normal tank is full, open the valve and let it gravity feed (because its higher up) into your normal tank.

 

Of course, you're going to have to remember for this setup when you have the valve open or not, otherwise you'll assume you an extra 20 gallons reserve when you're already using it :P:o

 

However, looking at the tank, you could simply drill whatever mounting holes you like. And for the sender, mostly they're just hanging off the end of a long metal rod, so that could be extended. In this kind of case, you could probably use a Subaru sender in the hole.

 

Just watch out for the expansion of the tank in the sun. These tank are designed to be used down under seats/in the hold, etc, so they're out of the sun. Aluminium expands a lot with heat, so I'd recommend making some kind of insulated sun cover ;)

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Why need a fuel sender?

Why not plumb the outlet of this tank into the fuel filler nozzle with a valve (some kind of agricultural fitting), then when you see your normal tank is full, open the valve and let it gravity feed (because its higher up) into your normal tank.

 

Of course, you're going to have to remember for this setup when you have the valve open or not, otherwise you'll assume you an extra 20 gallons reserve when you're already using it :P:o

 

However, looking at the tank, you could simply drill whatever mounting holes you like. And for the sender, mostly they're just hanging off the end of a long metal rod, so that could be extended. In this kind of case, you could probably use a Subaru sender in the hole.

 

Just watch out for the expansion of the tank in the sun. These tank are designed to be used down under seats/in the hold, etc, so they're out of the sun. Aluminium expands a lot with heat, so I'd recommend making some kind of insulated sun cover ;)

 

I have considered these things in my periodic obsessive thoughts on the project...

 

Sun/Heat and Mounting/Drilling holes:

I will not be drilling any holes for mounting whatsoever, and want to avoid drilling any additional holes for anythng else. I am hpoing to use the holes already built into tha tank for anything I need to do.

Part of the plan is to have a Diamondplate deck/bed cover over the whole bed. The tank will be under this and insulated. The construction of the deck will also help mount/hold the tank in place.   In fact, I was actually looking for hardware for doing that when I found this tank. Also, expansion will not be a problem anyway, as the tank fits across the bed with inces of spare space at either end. There will be significant mounting hardware, but between that hardware and the tank will be hard rubber, and the tank will likely be insulated as well. I may also be covering the main tank down under with something, as I like to do anyway, which ofcaurse should not be necessary, but I kinda like doing things like that anyway.

 

Gravity Feed re-fill /  Pumpsand gauges:

I have thought of the gravity re-filling of the main tank. Potential problems: (#1) The main tank I think is 14.? gallons, this secondary tank is 20 gal. That means that even if the main tank was empty, if the secondary tank was near full, it would overflow the main tank.

What I am thinking, and feel free to correct me/give input/etc. Is to have a second stock electric fuel pump for this tank, install a "Y" in the fuel line, and have a switch to switch from one tank & pump to the other,  The potential problem is if the pressure from one fuel pump could/might push gasoline back the wrong way through the opposite pump, in which case I would have to find and install one-way valves. I'm not sure if there are such things, and I would hesitate improvising with any one-way valve not meant for gasoline or solvents, etc. I could have fuel gauges for each tank, or again have a switch or same switch to also switch between gas tanks and gauges. I have a few mini SPDT switches to use on my projects, but I could maybe get and use a DPDT switch, which would switch two separate circuits into two different routes, twoway for either pump and two-way for either guage combined, but if space, etc.permits, I think it would be best to either have two guages, or two separate switches, to see how much is in each tank without switching the pumps. Again, this would all depend on whether or not one pump in the system would force gasoline in the wrong direction past the other pump. The question being if these stock pumps naturally act as kinda one-way valves I guess. UPDATE: One way fuel valves do exist, I will plan on using them.

 

Sender unit/Gauge/Pump consideration: I have found the appropiate sender for this tank, however, there are two complications with doing it the right way:

#1: Sounds dumb, but I cannot be sure if the tank is supposed to be upright with the filler tube facing up, being the top of the nak, which is likely, OR, as in land vehicles, often the sender unit is on the bottom. There are two raised pipe-threaded post/holes, which I do not know the purpose of. They would be very large for fuel feeds, and otherwise, where is the fuel line supposed to come out anyway? Out of the sender unit??? All features/holes/etc appear to be on the "top" ofthe tank.

#3: I had a minor psycho-sematic heart attack or aneurysm or embolism when I realised that I had not measured the vertical on the tank. (blinded by the thrill of finding this tank) I will have to mount it on a slant if not on its side.I can do this. It will work, but again, it completely changes the whole issue of what sender unit to use and how to mount it.

 

Other considerations:

Upto 166 pounds sloshing from side to side while pulling "G's" in turns...

Driving "enthusiastically" ( as I so love to do ) as in sharp turns, among other things - If I made or had a tank made, it would have had 'baffles' in the tanks to drastically reduce sloshing from one side to the other when I turned. This tank's label specifically addresses the issue, and even has some ratingfor the "G's" I would pull. I'm not too worried, but still, at I think it is 8.3 pounds weight per gallon, 20 gallons max, could weigh 166 pounds - 160 pounds suddenly sloshing to one side would probably have some effect on things, lol.. The tanks will be JUST ahead of the rear wheels, so otherwise the weight will be well balanced for the vehicle.

 

I would expect someone to take issue and ask "Why the hell do you need to double your gas capacity ?!?"...

If I were intending to be an off-roader, the answer would be easy. Being able to go deep into no-man's land where there are few or no gas stations.

Being that I am focusing on this being a street vehicle, it becomes a little harder to justify...

Its about having significant options with very little trade-off.

#1: Lowest gas price: IfI were to keep the main tank full,and the secondary tank at least half full or more, then I can make a fill-up last for weeks. In that time, I keep an eye on the lowest gas prices in the area, and can more often than not buy gas when the price is lowest, and waiting it out until the next best opportunity cvomes again.

#2: Long trips: Lets say I am taking a trip to Eugene for parts, I check the gas prices along the way. I start off with only one tank full, to compensate for relatively steep upgrades on the highway going through the moutain passes, but somewhere along the way wll be the cheapest gas, and that if where I fill up.

#3: Zombie Apocalypse / Natural Disaster / Electrical grid down / EMP due to sun spot, terrorist attck, nuke, etc - Imagine such, especially if power goes out. Even if some gas stations have back-up generators, which is very unlkely and rare if at all, then how doyou get gas??? In time there would be work-arounds, emergency rationed gas, or stations getting generators, but at first, for days, no fuel. I would have fuel !!!. Not only that, but since I have one of those wonderful Brats that have no electronic ignition, the odds are that I would have one of the very few vehicles able to even start.

So I could take off out tothe middle of nowhere and have plenty of gas to go hundreds of miles, - AND be able to come back without need of getting any more gas!

Also - I have a 1 Ton Super Cargo Van with dual tanks, and I will in the very near future be fitting it with a hitch, and the Brat with a tongue coupler, or whatever the other thingy is called. With the Van having both tanks filled, and towing the Brat, and the Brat now having three or four times the range of the Van, in the worst extreme, I could potentially travel half-way across the continent or further before needing a fill up, and completely across if I was able to get gas. This I couldpotentially go any where if need be.

#3: Empty tank/No downside: This gas tank, as big as it is, weighs only about 20 pounds, so if I do not keep it filled, it has virtually no effect on the operation or weight of the vehicle. It is a Just-In-Case Ready-To-Go option.

#4: Zombie Apocalypse Alight !: I could mount a flame thrower that would last quite some time, and in some way, Zombies would at least be distracted or have a hard time seeing/sensing, giving me a significant advantage, AND it would also be quite amusing seeing zombies on fire futilly flayaling about ! lol...

- Yeah, I know....Zombies don't really exist...... - Do they???

Edited by Subaruist
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Subarist,

 

a thought I just had.

IIRC, the fuel pump is in the engine bay on these models. You could simply T piece the fuel feed lines from each tank together without any valves. The system will automatically draw from wherever physics thinks is best (which I suspect will be from the higher tank first due to its higher "potential energy").

This will probably pressure the factory tank when you're not driving & cause it to overflow from the factory filler, so a 1-way valve on the line from that tank would be advisable.

 

This method would eliminate any need for electronics or solenoids.

 

If you want to have solenoids, search for something off older diesels which still have a mechanical distribution pump. The only way to stop an engine on those is to shut off the fuel, which they do by a solenoid in the fuel feed line which is has an electromagnet that is energised (open) when supplied power, and shuts when the power supply is removed.

 

A lot of modern cars have the fuel feed come out the top of the tank, but they also have the fuel pump inside the tank pushing. Not sure how big the opening is for the sender as to whether you could squeeze a pump through there.

 

In a previous job, I had a 200L tank for diesel mounted up on the aluminium tray of a "ute". It also had a larger metal toolbox up there also. But being a full chassis commercial vehicle, there's no way it would corner like a Subaru anyways... :P

You could add a rear sway bar, and stiffen up the front one if you're worried about cornering. Won't have a bad effect on off-roading unless you're into the extreme stuff.

 

People here with lift kits have cut their metal tanks & welded in strips to extend their range. If you're worried about about being in a remote place, try coming here. Our country is about 90% of the size of the US mainland, yet we only have 7 states and 10% of the population.

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Subarist,

 

a thought I just had.

IIRC, the fuel pump is in the engine bay on these models. You could simply T piece the fuel feed lines from each tank together without any valves. The system will automatically draw from wherever physics thinks is best (which I suspect will be from the higher tank first due to its higher "potential energy").

This will probably pressure the factory tank when you're not driving & cause it to overflow from the factory filler, so a 1-way valve on the line from that tank would be advisable.

 

This method would eliminate any need for electronics or solenoids.

 

If you want to have solenoids, search for something off older diesels which still have a mechanical distribution pump. The only way to stop an engine on those is to shut off the fuel, which they do by a solenoid in the fuel feed line which is has an electromagnet that is energised (open) when supplied power, and shuts when the power supply is removed.

 

A lot of modern cars have the fuel feed come out the top of the tank, but they also have the fuel pump inside the tank pushing. Not sure how big the opening is for the sender as to whether you could squeeze a pump through there.

 

In a previous job, I had a 200L tank for diesel mounted up on the aluminium tray of a "ute". It also had a larger metal toolbox up there also. But being a full chassis commercial vehicle, there's no way it would corner like a Subaru anyways... :P

You could add a rear sway bar, and stiffen up the front one if you're worried about cornering. Won't have a bad effect on off-roading unless you're into the extreme stuff.

 

People here with lift kits have cut their metal tanks & welded in strips to extend their range. If you're worried about about being in a remote place, try coming here. Our country is about 90% of the size of the US mainland, yet we only have 7 states and 10% of the population.

1st gen brats are in the engine bay and 2nd gen brats have the pump under the bed.

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Subarist,

 

a thought I just had.

IIRC, the fuel pump is in the engine bay on these models. You could simply T piece the fuel feed lines from each tank together without any valves. The system will automatically draw from wherever physics thinks is best (which I suspect will be from the higher tank first due to its higher "potential energy").

This will probably pressure the factory tank when you're not driving & cause it to overflow from the factory filler, so a 1-way valve on the line from that tank would be advisable.

 

This method would eliminate any need for electronics or solenoids.

 

If you want to have solenoids, search for something off older diesels which still have a mechanical distribution pump. The only way to stop an engine on those is to shut off the fuel, which they do by a solenoid in the fuel feed line which is has an electromagnet that is energised (open) when supplied power, and shuts when the power supply is removed.

 

A lot of modern cars have the fuel feed come out the top of the tank, but they also have the fuel pump inside the tank pushing. Not sure how big the opening is for the sender as to whether you could squeeze a pump through there.

 

In a previous job, I had a 200L tank for diesel mounted up on the aluminium tray of a "ute". It also had a larger metal toolbox up there also. But being a full chassis commercial vehicle, there's no way it would corner like a Subaru anyways... :P

You could add a rear sway bar, and stiffen up the front one if you're worried about cornering. Won't have a bad effect on off-roading unless you're into the extreme stuff.

 

People here with lift kits have cut their metal tanks & welded in strips to extend their range. If you're worried about about being in a remote place, try coming here. Our country is about 90% of the size of the US mainland, yet we only have 7 states and 10% of the population.

 

Solenoids? A logical and obvious consideration of course, but never entered my plans. I plan on putting 1-way vales into the installation, but want to go with two fuel pumps and a switch between them, as I know it will work, but I also get a second fuel pump out of it, and in a pinch where a fuel pump goes bad, I have a back-up, and could also just switch to the other tank until I could fix or replace the bad pump, especially depending on where and how I mount things.

The question remaining is if I want to rig a switch to go between the two tanks, which would be the assumtion and wouldsave on space wherever ther is left tomountanything in my tiny cab, as opposed to the convenience of seeing two gauges and how much either tank has at any time at a glance.

 

I know that in-tank pumps are supposed to be safe, but personally, outside of simple wiring for a gas gauge, I would never have anything powered in my gas tank lol. Just that electricity + gas simply does not sound good to me no matter what.

 

As I stated previously, I may have to do some serious improvising where any gas gauge is concerned, due to the tank likely being mounted at a serious angle in consideration of the bed deck/cover. I only have so much vertical space under it at min/max which seems to be around 15 incehs or so max. The tank itself is just over 16" tall, not counting the filler tube or anything else. Even if I max things out, I cannot have the bed/deck any higher than the rear window rubber, which is still under 16 inches max.So the tank is likely going to be essentially sideways, with the 'top' likely facing forward, on the forward facing side, mounted on top of the front portion of the wheel wells. (other mounts as well for the potential weight) I might mount it with the 'top' facing rear, beacuse of its shape, which is somewhat trapezoidal if I have the right term. It would be almost impossible to get/rig any kind of gas gauge sender that would reach into the 'bottom' - side and be accurate. I could use the gas sender intended for it, and MAYBE turn it 90 degrees, but there are 5 screw/mount holes for it, which makes that almost impossible, whereas it would likely work with 4 or 6 holes. That means drilling custome holees and making sure that the original holes are utterly sealed, and I will nottrust just a gasket to do that. Also, even then,  would have to rig it as it would have a drastically different range due to a drastically different span orswing. going from what should be several inches to less than maybe 5 or 7 inches.

A 90 degree bend in the filer tube is no problem, although I will have to find something for the end, a typical filler opening, and be able to mount it securely.

I am hoping to have a hatch/lid/cover with the gas cap below, and some drain hole/tube for over-flowing when some Oregon gas station idiot tries to fill it.

Here in Oregon, drivers are not allowed to fill thier own gas into a vehicle, can or anything bcause gas has been declared a hazardous substance.

Makes one wonder how they expect a home owner to fill thier lawn mower with gas - are they supposed to take the mower to the gas station?!? Idiocy.

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