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Tire rotation and lug nut torque questions


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13 replies to this topic

#1 Haunty

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 03:01 PM

Is there a technique for rotating tires yourself using simple equipment (jacks)?

And is there a device for measuring the torque on lug nuts, or tightening to a specific torque?

:confused:

#2 Caboobaroo

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 05:51 PM

I usually cross rotate the front tires to the rear (LF -> RR, RF -> LR) and move the rear tires straight forward (LR -> LF, RR -> RF). I usually do it on a rack but I have done it in my garage with a jack and a pair of jackstands. Takes awhile but it can be done.

Wheel lugnut torque is 80 lbs-ft.

#3 MilesFox

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 10:08 PM

The owner's manual will state that rotation is front to back, same side.

if you are replacing 2 new tires with existing, you can do it diagonal to prevent any rotational difference between the front and rear diff across the trans/center diff.

#4 Fairtax4me

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 12:03 AM

And is there a device for measuring the torque on lug nuts, or tightening to a specific torque?

The device would be called a torque wrench.
Wheel nut torque may differ on the newer models, but everything from 1990 til at least 2004 is 65 ft-lbs.

If you place a jack correctly under the car, you can lift both wheels on one side at a time. Be sure to use wheel chocks and the parking brake. Side jack stands under the jack points on the rocker panels.

#5 heartless

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 02:38 PM

i do the jacking front and rear & use jack stands in the appropriate places, but we have a nice shop jack and many jack stands.

jacking front - place jack so it lifts @ the center of front crossmember once car is high enough, place the jack stands, lower jack

jacking rear - place jack so it lifts @ rear diff, jack up the back end, place jack stands, Rotate tires. :)

easy peasy.

If you dont have jack stands, it can still be done, just takes a lot longer.

jack up one corner, remove tire, place spare on, lower car, move to next corner, jack up, swap tires, repeat until you get back to the first corner, remove spare, place last tire, lower car - check lug nuts, done.

#6 Haunty

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 04:42 PM

If you dont have jack stands, it can still be done, just takes a lot longer.

jack up one corner, remove tire, place spare on, lower car, move to next corner, jack up, swap tires, repeat until you get back to the first corner, remove spare, place last tire, lower car - check lug nuts, done.



That's what I was thinking of doing - using the spare, since it seems easy and fairly safe. Maybe I'll give that a try first. :clap:

#7 Haunty

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 04:48 PM

The device would be called a torque wrench.


Thanks, I knew there was some sort of doohickey for it. I'm learneding :drunk:

#8 Fairtax4me

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 12:34 AM

:D :Flame:
You'll want a half inch drive model, and a deep 19mm socket.
Most auto parts stores seem to carry somewhat decent cheap torque wrenches in the $75 range, and they'll work fine for torquing lug nuts. Sears Craftsman torque wrenches are better quality than the parts store jobs but are around $125- $150. If you have a Harbor Freight nearby, they sell one for $20. I'm not sure how much I would trust the seriously cheapo HF wrench but it may work well enough just for lug nuts.

#9 heartless

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 01:43 PM

the Harbor Freight one works well enough for most "general" applications - not sure I trust it for something like headbolts, but for lug nuts, crank pulleys, tie rod ends, and the like, it does well enough.

#10 Caboobaroo

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 05:56 PM

I had one of the Harbor Freight special torque wrenches at it worked decent. Finally broke it after 8 years of abuse and then I decided to go with the full digital Snap-On 1/2" drive torque wrench. I use it for head gasket jobs as well which is why I spent over $500 on it but its already paid for itself in my industry.

If you're in a pinch, HF has a decent one but I would check out the ones at Sears first.

#11 MilesFox

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 06:03 PM

. Side jack stands under the jack points on the rocker panels.


don't do this if the car is rusty. place it under suspension components.

#12 Haunty

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 10:00 AM

Is Tekton any good? Their wrenches look to be in the middle price range.

My car seems super low to the ground, for oil changes I'd have to raise it up. Manual says it should be level when draining oil. I'm thinking ramps in front and jack stands in back if needed.

#13 Fairtax4me

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 01:51 PM

I have a large set of tekton impact sockets. Cheap, only paid $100 for the whole set, 3/8 drive standard and deep sockets 10mm - 19mm, 1/2 drive standard and deep 10mm to 32mm. A few sizes skip, but I haven't needed any that we're in between yet. Lifetime warranty too.
They used to be under Michigan industrial tools label.

#14 edrach

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 08:55 AM

Just a comment on Harbor Freight tools: HF has the same lifetime replacement guarantee on all their handtools as Craftsman (Sears). I'm not sure it extends to their torque wrench, but I've gone in to have cracked sockets, ratchet wrenches and such replaced with no questions asked.




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