Jump to content
Ultimate Subaru Message Board

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/23/24 in all areas

  1. it was one of those rare cases where id say: easier done than said even with the window stuck on up. all done in 20 minutes. in the name of science, opened the old motor, all damage was due to water ingression, god knows how it got there
    5 points
  2. Likely need to swap the crank and LH cam sprocket from the old engine. The tone wheels for the crank and cam sensors are part of those sprockets, and there are a couple different patterns.
    3 points
  3. A lot of these pictures are going to be just admiration shots. I'm sure everybody will understand. Both '87s! Fun fact, that's not actually an El Camino, it's the lesser known GMC version, the Caballero. So I finally got a little time to give the BRAT a quick look over. Well first and foremost, I need to get some tires on this thing. At first glance I saw the last two date code numbers on the tires (all four matching btw) was '18' so I knew they were old but not ancient and should be replaced in due time. WELL I didn't notice the date code was only three digits long.... That means the manufacture date is actually *1998* ....🤦 Oi vey. So tires are now a very high priority. The e-brake is not hooked up on either front caliper. I went to attach them because everything seems to be in order but it seems like the lever on each caliper is in the wrong position. Something is definitely not right, when I bolt the e-brake cable bracket to the caliper the cable is way too Forward and not lining up with the lever. In brief glancing it seems to me that if I could re-clock the position of the lever coming off each caliper about 20 degrees toward the rear of the vehicle, everything will line up. As it is right now the lever on the calipers will actually come into contact with the metal bracket the cable passes through. The front left strut is broken. It is detached from the top hat. The weight of the front end holds it all together, but this is a very not ideal situation. I will need to fix that. The rust is there but not terminal. That can be addressed later. The braking system and exhaust system need gone through. They both function but are not very well repaired; more hacked together. All things in time. It still looks great, eh? 210 miles on it so far. 22 mpg avg.
    2 points
  4. Probably overthinking it, I've taken them apart and put them back randomly with no issues.
    2 points
  5. I’ve rebuilt a ton of totaled cars which many people claim is hard, terrible, and fraught with danger and potential rejection or unknown problems and the state is out to get you. I’m an untrained DIY guy, never had shop classes or been in auto business. Never had a problem rebuilding a totaled car and getting a real title for it. It’s not a big deal. I haven’t done a title-less car but after the rebuilding process I wouldn’t be deterred if the right situation presented itself. I’ve seen the process listed looking at potential buys and other car protocols. The state tells you what to do - go do what they say. In my experience the inspectors and people involved aren’t as bad to deal with as many claim. They just want to see the I’s crossed and T’s dotted and nothing sketchy and you’re good.
    2 points
  6. So recently I did the maxima alternator upgrade. super simple. just had to redneck machine the spacer under the pulley and attach a few wires. while I was at it I unclusterfked the wiring from the guy I sold it to, the bought it back from I then replaced the redline weber adapter with the transdapt 2107. A few months ago I took it on a road rally. was a blast. And today I discovered the engine I put together which is a combination of an spfi block and the carb engine heads and cams, is high enough compression that it needs premium..
    1 point
  7. Good advice @scoobydube, but this is an eight year thread update request from 88glonthadl. Long shot to get a reply but sometimes worth asking. Cheers Bennie
    1 point
  8. I bought a set of the LED headlight bulbs that was deemed directly compatible with my OEM headlight bulbs. Big mistake. My digital dash went haywire and the engine began cutting out and otherwise ran poorly. Then the below dash relay switches were overheating and burning out. Finally, I realized that those LED's were screwing up my car big time, but only after I changed out my distributor, coil, cap and fusible links in a rain storm. Now I am back to the the OEM bulbs, have installed all new relay switches, and keep a handful of spare relay switches to pop in if I have any further problems. 524,000 miles on my 86 gl10 turbo.
    1 point
  9. Finally. Fine-all-LEE. I snagged one. 😁 I mean, I'm in South Central Pennsylvania, and I've been looking for a brat within my budget for almost 10 years. Everything I'd come across was either too far gone; Or just way too expensive ( >10k!) Then it finally happened and, in my usual casual browsing of Face-space market world, I came across the BRAT in the lead picture. The price was good. I had a really nice 96 Brighton I built up over the last 3 or so years, and I listed it on marketplace to fund my pipe dream. It sold in 3 days. On day 4 I was out my door at 4:30 in the morning and on the road in my 1st gen legacy wagon with a dolly in tow, and beginning my 230 mile journey to my destination BRAT. Once there (about 10 after 8 in the morning) I got my first look at the truck in person and it was good. Not perfect, but good. It has a bull -bar on the front that looks pretty bad-rump roast and I'd love to know more about it (dealer option? Aftermarket?), and a rear bumper with a tow hitch and missing the end caps. Speaking of caps, all the center caps were present too, and as an added bonus at some point in the truck's life somebody added seats to the back (this being an 87 model, the only year they didn't come with the seats in the US as far as I know, also why it doesn't have the built in step in the rocker behind the door). The original seats (interior ones) were replaced with some newer model Subaru seats, but the guy still had them. I started it up, drove it up and down the driveway, checked the 4wd worked, made sure nothing was gonna fall off of it, threw the original seats in the back of the wagon, strapped the truck up and hit the road! (Look what followed me home!)
    1 point
  10. The calmasters I actually had gotten from a member on here and I got them for a STEAL of a price because the gentleman quoted me a price including shipping that turned out to be way less than the actual cost to ship them (I think they came from Alaska but I could be wrong) but the person was a man of their word and wouldn't accept any more money or just give up the transaction all together either. They sold them to me for what I'm sure was quite a loss and I definitely appreciated that. I originally got them for my GL/Loyale (Leone) cars, but they wound up getting parked and I didn't want these to rust so I pulled them and put them in the basement. My understanding is they were a limited run of 4x140 wheels made by an aftermarket company out of California. Come to find the BRAT is a California model as well so they kinda seem fitting on there. I don't know. We'll see. Thanks for all the kind words
    1 point
  11. By VIN, your car uses the 040. 100 is for the 3.0 and 07-09 253 (I work in parts at a Subaru dealership). Destination code U5 is for California, even though it's a 253.
    1 point
  12. Drove the car around the block this morning, ran smooth and pulled hard. Took a log of that and sent it to Haltech, hopefully they can tell some difference between the two. Recently finished these taller castle nuts, don't think I'd posted a picture yet. We had one strip out on one of B's ball joints a while back and it could have been a lot worse had we been going over a walking pace. About twice the thread engagement if you don't count the castellated part. 4340 steel, need to check hardness vs the stock ones when I get my hardness tester back, might get them heat treated. Since we normally have to use a washer or two under the stock castle nuts with our fabricated control arms these fit instead without washers. Put one on the Impreza when we reassembled it.
    1 point
  13. Thought at first maybe a cam skipped timing or something but at least according to the Haltech they were still all good. Compression test isn't easy on these as you probably know. Haven't heard back from Haltech yet, will probably call them tomorrow. Will fire it up first, wouldn't be surprised if it runs OK after sitting.
    1 point
  14. We got the Impreza back together. While it was apart I tried to do some wiring with mixed results. We did get the reverse lights working. Spliced a connector on the wires that normally go to the auto trans to a connector that plugs into the 6MT harness. Both bulbs were a little corroded. Then it seemed like we had to shift it in and out of reverse a few times before they'd consistently light up, maybe the switch on the trans was a little sticky or dirty. Was going to splice the VSS in but the Impreza speedo appears to take a reluctor (2 wire) signal, VSS on the 6MT is 3 wire so I assume Hall effect. Will probably run the VSS signal to the Haltech and then hopefully a signal out from that to the speedo. I did swap the coolant temp sensor from the EZ30 in. It's 3 pin vs the EZ36 2 pin. Was hoping this would make the ECU read the temp more accurately since that's the actual sensor it's set up for but it still reads 200-210F while running which I think is higher than actual. Then I ran a wire from the other pin on the sensor to the temp gauge but unfortunately the temp gauge just reads high all the time now when the ignition is on. So much for Subarus being Legos. At least it's not a cable speedo I guess. Will post more details and pictures on the wiring when I figure out a little more. Still other wiring to figure out, fuel gauge still isn't working even though I don't think we did anything to that wiring. Need to get cruise working before any road trips. Also would be nice to have AC but still not sure if we can just give the solenoid on this compressor 12VDC indefinitely. I did clean up the wiring more, it's almost all in loom now, getting closer to being able to put the dash back in. The biggest improvement was in the shifting. The reverse lockout finally works consistently. Even better than that, with no slop it's a lot easier to find the gear you want. I think before there was more slop than actual shifter travel at least side to side. Engine was running great for about a half hour while we were doing some street tuning.We were lugging it up some hills (third gear full throttle 500RPM) to tune for low RPM high load. Stalled it a few times and after one rough stall I restarted the engine and it ran rough. No alarms/codes, air fuel seemed decent, cam timing looked decent. Cruised around town a bit, restarted it a few times, kept running rough. Not terrible but noticeably rougher idle and down on power. Probably unrelated since it was doing this before it started running rough but the ignition timing only matches the map at 2-3000RPM+. Anything below that it was around 3 or 5 degrees even though that part of the map is 10 to 20 degrees. Wondering if there some correction factor I'm missing or if this all some kind of idle region where the timing isn't following the base map. We tried it with and without the long term knock correction, no difference there in timing or whether it ran rough. Sent a log to Haltech, hopefully they see something. I did try reloading the older map and it still ran rough. Other than that everything seemed to work well, still doesn't leak a drop except from the one control arm bushing. We adjusted all the struts for maximum negative camber (didn't actually measure, probably not much less than zero since it sits so high) and the toe seems perfect at both ends. I hadn't really hit any obstacles since the gauge cluster is just sitting on the dash bar but I hit a small speed bump without thinking and the front end completely soaked it up. Rear end kicked a bit but more sound than feel (pile of plastic interior bits in the back). That will be better with a few hundred pounds of cargo in the back. So then of course I started hitting every speed bump and pothole I could find, it soaked them up nicely. It is a little bouncy on relatively smooth pavement, I think due to the relatively stiff springs for the weight. Will see how it sits loaded but might go with softer springs in the rear eventually. This set of struts has the valving a shock tuning expert suggested to us. Should be interesting to trail ride now with this Impreza, B's Forester, and Z's Forester all with significantly different shock valving but the same springs, wheel and tire sizes, wheelbase, and weight.
    1 point
  15. Check the hood emissions hose chart. It may have it. Looks like there is enough material there that you could go to ACE Hardware and get a brass fitting that is a barb on one side and and pipe thread on the other. Get the correct tap and thread it.
    1 point
  16. A few STI 6MT assembly tips and questions. So it seems the reverse lockout arm should be spring loaded towards the front of the car as shown in the picture above. Then the cable at its normal length will hold that arm so the hole is lined up with the case and it will be locked out of reverse. Pull on the cable and the arm will swing out of the lockout position. Had a heck of a time getting these lugs lined up to put the bolts in them through the side of the case. Finally I propped the lower one up with this little scrap of sheet metal. Got the bolts started and then opened the case just enough to pull it out with a tweezers. Main shift shaft has this large ball spring loaded against it but no notches. Is this just to add friction? There is a mark on the shaft where it looks like the ball was rubbing before, I don't think I've assembled it incorrectly. There's a notch in it towards the top that is for the neutral(?) sensor. Shift yoke roll pin hole is very oversized. Seems round, not worn, probably for a different trans? Welded the holes on both sides and ground them out to about the same size as the selector shaft on the trans. Hammered the roll pins in, no slop now.
    1 point
  17. Good time to paint your rims if getting new tyres - do it with the old tyres fitted so you don’t need to stress about overspray on the tyre itself. You should know glamour shots are ALWAYS welcome/appreciated! Cheers Bennie
    1 point
  18. Sounds right in line with any east coast find Subaru of the 70’s or 80’s. Pretty much the items that make it stand and stop. And maybe add in occasional fuel delivery if a true rust bucket or longtime sitter. Those black round things I think tofu won’t have as hard of a time if you go with the 165’s Good luck, and enjoy! Similar situation here with my 79. So if the stars align, where do me meet up? Barrens? Carlisle? Most of the northeast vintage Subaru people keep real low profiles. There’s a good amount but getting folks gathered is like herding cats. So I’ve heard.
    1 point
  19. when i was poorer i made my own with a piece of thick wall pipe, some drifts done on a lathe and the biggest threaded rod i could find, think it was a M14 or M18. it wasnt fun, a bit sketchy too, but it did the job, Where there's a will, there's a way
    1 point
  20. I know which one is pick out of that bunch! And your worst nightmare - filling that thing up with fuel must cost an absolute packet! Plus it’s not where near as cool as the BRAT! Cheers Bennie
    1 point
  21. About 250 miles after getting this OB running, alternator belt squeal made itself known at engine startup and beginning of turns. Found that the PS pump elbow o-rings had hardened allowing air to be sucked in. Found metric o-rings of 13mm ID x 1.5mm CS at my local Ace Hardware for $0.65 each! Added a very small bead of Loctite 517 flange sealant to face of elbow just above top o-ring groove to make sure no air gets in. No more squeal! Found that driver side crankcase breather hose connector on H4 airbox had cracked. Tried JB quickweld but that didn't hold. 30 M1 carbine brass is just right OD to fit inside this plastic nub and GOOP plastic weld bonds well with airbox. Saved a trip to find a replacement H4 California only airbox!
    1 point
  22. Youse guys down under are absolutely nuts. That whole country/Continent (countrinent? Continry?) sounds insane and full of ways to be killed lol, cheers to you all.
    1 point
  23. And you’re about right with the cow catcher. I’m sure the five poster came from mustering cattle in old jeeps and land cruisers way back in the day - then they made their way to the front of road going vehicles. You can buy them for newer model vehicles too. I’d love a set of scrub bars for mine that then drop down below the door sill. And it looks heavy, but it’s not. I’d say several kg heavier than an alloy bullbar that’s commonly seen on Brumby’s over here. Cheers Bennie
    1 point
  24. Like I said I prefer the exhaust as quiet as possible. I know it won't be like a stock EJ22 but for long road trips quiet is best. I am using a standalone because I wanted to use an EZ36 and as far as I know that's the only way to do it with the variable cam timing. You could maybe swap the entire wiring harness out of a donor car but the standalone is probably easiest. I expected wiring issues and troubleshooting but so far it hasn't been too bad. Overall I'm not sure which is more complicated (the first time), the harness merge we did with the EZ30 or this standalone wiring job. The standalone is more expensive but also allows you to tune the engine and do all kinds of other things. B and I did a little more tuning and then decided to take a break. When I went to back the car out of the garage it kept popping out of reverse. By trying to hold it in reverse it would kind of work but still kept popping out. I'm guessing the root of the problem is we've never had the reverse lockout working properly (in this car or the black Outback) and it's seen one too many grinds. We think we have the cable adjusted right but need a spring and probably a bracket to get it working right. We checked some things and accepted it was probably in the trans so we removed that. I had bought a mostly complete but not fully assembled 6MT from a local shop a few years ago fairly cheap. The reverse synchros and fork in that looked fresh so I figured we probably have all the parts we need to fix it. Got the trans out of the Impreza mostly apart but couldn't get the gear stack out last night. This morning I looked it up and found you have to remove the oil pump to get at a snapring that holds the input shaft in place. Synchro teeth on reverse are definitely worn. For reference, good synchro teeth. I think the biggest issue is probably the plastic pads on the fork being worn off. Even the center pad is worn. For reference, good stock fork. So I get to reassemble and reinstall that. Two steps forward one step back or something. While it's out it should be fairly easy to make a bracket and add a spring for the reverse lockout. Before we pulled the trans we did weigh the car. Fairly complete, full tank of gas, 3245# total. 1900# front, 1345# rear. About 250# more weight on the front axle and 100# more than the rear compared to stock. With a few hundred pounds of cargo and a heavier rear bumper the weight bias shouldn't be too bad. I haven't pushed it yet but the cornering seems decent. Rear brakes definitely lock up first but it has bigger diameter rear rotors than front. Will probably eventually put bigger rotors on the front (second gen Legacy/first gen Forester, same as the rotors we're using in the rear).
    1 point
  25. Thanks bud. Harold was pretty clean when we picked him up in 2022, but you know how car guys are, we had to bring him up to the next level. We had heaps of help from a lot of really good people along the way. I had folks from all over the world send us parts, the fellow who helped with the paint and body work was a real legend, and the guy who reproduced the graphics was amazing. Believe it or not, the hardest bit to find here in the states was a matching set of front factory mud flaps. The Subaru color was number 243, "Cosmic Blue", and the closest match after 40 years of paint fade from being in the high desert was actually a late 1990's Volvo color. Our paint guy spent many hours tweaking it, so it matched from every angle. I had no idea, the "flop" as it is called (the shimmer from the metal flake) looks different on different parts of the car, and in different light. Part science, part art, and part voodoo. I'm pretty handy with a wrench, but there are two things that I'm afraid of... one is body work, and the other is automatic transmissions. Thankfully Harold is a four speed manual, and the only bit of electronics is the silly digital clock mounted in the dash. I appreciate the kind words.
    1 point
  26. Thanks for the tips, mate! That 5 post is nuts, and what's that quote from? Canonball run? That bull bar like like what we call a cow catcher that would be on the front of a train 🤣 The brakes actually feel pretty good, but I look forward to looking over the rear brakes as well as the rest of the vehicle when I can, I wish I had the time. So far I've literally just replaced the battery, changed the belt, replaced the brake hose, filled the gas tank, checked the tire pressure, and drove it. 60 miles about now. Those rear manual adjusters sound just like the ones they put on the 2wd Leone's/loyalest. I'm familiar with them. I love the adjustable suspension set up on these things. Super cool (along with the rest of the truck) The one thing I look forward to getting sorted sooner rather than later will be the lack of emergency brake.
    1 point
  27. Congratulations again and great to see more classics in the northeast. Enjoy! Post back your car show trophies.
    1 point
  28. You guys got all the cool colours over there! We got white, red, beige and a silver one that I believe was a limited run. Also interesting to see you have a bumper mounted side indicator rather than having it in the front guards/fenders. All of ours are in the guards. Very tidy looking unit! I love that desert fox decal down the side. Cheers Bennie
    1 point
  29. I forgot to add that the brake sponginess is most likely due to the rear brake shoes needing adjustment. They’re manually adjust via a small square headed boot on the diff side of the backing plate, under the bearing. If you’re really lucky you’ll have the factory rubber cover on them still. If not no stress. Spray them with some penetrative lube and let them sit, repeat several times of they’re stuck good. You can adjust the brakes with the wheels in the air, this will let you know if they’re too tight or not. The bolt will roll over with a lumpy feel to it. This ensures the bolt can’t back out and loosen off your brakes. That will make a huge difference to the feel of your brake pedal. It could be worth removing the drums to clean out the years of crap that will be in there. Also a good time to inspect for slave cylinder leaks and the general condition of the brake shoes. Cheers Bennie
    1 point
  30. Awe geez you found your way into the great USMB. Get your ticket for the WBM yet ? Welcome or welcome back whichever may apply. Car looks great!
    1 point
  31. Looks good l75eya! Bit of rust that us Aussies baulk at but seems to be no issue on your side of the world. I’ve not seen a rear bar like that before, looks tidy even without the bumperettes to finish off the sides. Good score on the targa top too - not really a targa as I found out last year but that’s what they’re know as over here. If you’ve still got the instruction sticker on the roof lining panel the roof glass is referred to as a “fun top”. And I have to say it - modifying a classic quote from a classic Aussie movie you guys would probably know… “That’s not a bullbar… …THAT’S a bullbar.” I’m sure if you can weld in new panels to fix that rust you could weld up one of these five posters while you’re at it I’m looking forward to seeing where you go with this one! Cheers Bennie
    1 point
  32. After another 230 miles of mostly mountains (Leggo did great!), I got it home. When I finally got some time to give it a little attention I looked it over a bit and found the alternator belt was WAY too loose. The wrong belt was on the car, seemingly. This brat has no AC and no power steering and I think the belt was for a power steering equipped model so that was the first order of business. After getting the right belt on there, I felt confident in it enough to take it for a test drive. That was all going great until I had to cycled the brakes a few times and noticed the pedal ongetting progressively more stiff and the motor laboring more and more to keep moving the car. The brakes (at least one of em) were hanging up bad. Pulled over and it became very apparent the front left wheel was super warm and smelled like brake pad. I made it half a mile! Lol Fortunately I happened to be looking through rock auto a couple days prior and noticed a front brake hose on wholesale closeout and decided to buy it completely unknowingly and just because it was super cheap ($3!) that worked out well because it came in the next day, I slapped that SOB in there, bled the line, and hit the road again! Checked the air in the tires, filled the tank, hit the car wash. In all it's glory. And here is the earliest service record I was able to find. This explains the relatively good condition it's in. She's a WEST SIDE unit.
    1 point
  33. Moosens described checking if the cam timing is correct My bet is that the crank and LH cam sprockets are incorrect. Pull the covers and check the crank sprockets (can be done without removing the timing belt) between the 2 engines. But yea, swap the manifold gaskets for the correct ones. Pull trouble codes before taking stuff apart.
    1 point
  34. Its best to start a.new thread for your problem. Things that can cause bad running- first things to check, in no particular order - Bad fuel, Bad coolant temp sensor. Low fuel pressure, blocked cat.
    1 point
  35. Think I found a big part of my problems. That's the signal wire for the main cam. The purple wire next to it is the temp sensor which was bouncing around the last time I ran it. With that wire fixed it now picks up the main cam signal pretty consistently. Coolant temp is reading steady. Fuel injected is back to a reasonable amount too, still not sure what was causing the super rich mixture. One exhaust cam isn't reading consistently, checked that but it looked and maybe felt a little bit loose, crimped it more and felt solid but still losing that cam signal occasionally. Ran a lot better but broke up around 3000rpm. Low range works. Put the cam timing base maps and duty cycles back to their starting points. Tuned the duty cycles a bit so the cam angles followed the target fairly close. Ran better, pulls strong but seems to be running pretty lean under load. Got the brake lights and turn signals working (simple fixes) but gas gauge still isn't working. Put it on my insurance. Still needs more work but nice to have it running and driving well finally.
    1 point
  36. If you have the space, a 20 ton press from harbor freight is handy for older wheel bearings, I've done a few. There's a used KD hub tamer on Ebay, might be missing the two-jaw puller, same set also on CL for over a month, but I've not used one before.
    1 point
  37. I don't know about newer axles, but for 2007 and earlier were all made by NTN. Look for the NTN stamped on the cup. If the axle doesn't have a name stamping or serial number, it's an el cheapo.
    1 point
  38. Silicone is a no-go for gasoline applications. The best material I have found is Nitrile rubber sheets (aka Buna-N, NBR, etc.) and it is approved for gasoline and many other oils and fuels. I laser cut it to make fuel pump diaphragms for mechanical fuel pumps in my older classic cars. You can get plain sheets or Nylon cloth infused sheets if you need extra strength. I've bought from ebay, McMaster-Carr, Amazon and Grainger in the past. Plain Nitrile should be fine for your fuel tank sender gasket.
    1 point
  39. Probably transfer clutches. Get them new, and fix it. You don't have to pull the transmission, and a used trans is likely to also have worn clutches. Also inspect all rear suspension and diff bushings. AWD could be engaging normally, but a bushing is clunking when it's loaded.
    1 point
  40. and some more project Pictures
    1 point
  41. @Uberoo - going on from protontodd’s thread: you asked me about strengthening the L chassis after I made some comments about this. Below is what was shared with me. That’s all I’ve got and it’s not great quality in terms of sharp detail. Hopefully that gives you an idea of what was done for the rally vehicle setup Apologies for the delay in digging this up. It’s been in the back of my mind for a long time! Cheers Bennie
    1 point
  42. 1 point
  43. The AUDM series 1 RX turbo TPSwitch has A22-610 972 stamped in its backing plate. Its three pins not marked but manuals indicate if you look at pins with plug locator central slide alignment guide bottom central, they are A C B In that order C common black ecu ground in centre A &C is idle switch C & B is flat out switch that operates @32° (or 47° AUDM only) Now curious as to Series 1 Vortex XT non turbo were
    1 point
  44. The front drivers side is like a 2.5"x3.5" - there's no direct replacement availible. The passenger side front is like a 3"x4.5" or some stupid thing - nothing for that either. Also - you can't use the factory wireing because it's common ground, so you'll have to rewire anyway. Might as well replace those crappy speaks with something else while your at it. I got some speakers that were close in size, and just MADE them fit - lots of work with a dremel - they are in, but it was a pain in the rump roast (talking about my Brat here). On my wagon, I just disconnected them, and put the tweeters on the A pillar, and the mids in the forward section of the door. Problem with the door speakers is they are really shallow, and anything you get that will fit in there is going to be deeper, so you'll have to space them out. The factory location is REALLY bad as it projects the sound right into the seats :-\ I built custom boxes and mounted them further forward after removing the map pockets. It's a pain to wire in decent stereos into these cars, but it can be done. Had my car ripped up for days doing this.... GD
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...