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  1. I primed mine using a drill press literally as an arbor press. I placed each lifter upright in a can of oil and then pressed into the dimple firmly for 20-30 seconds using a rounded rod chucked in the drill collet. I watched tiny air bubbles being forced out the bleed hole along with some old oil on each stroke. I did this until no more air was coming out. Maybe 5-6 strokes. This is a very slow process but it 100% assures that you have no air in the lifter and even better, you get a bit of a feel for a defect if one lifter bleeds down way too fast compared to others. I did this process on used HLAs that had been sitting for 14 years in the engine. I've not heard a single tick since the day I fired up the engine. I did new oil pump seals and other common lifter anti-tick tips too.
    5 points
  2. Alright guys. The moment I have been waiting for.... After several weeks of diagnostic, scouring forums, trying out different advice from people here on the forum, I am happy to report the car is fixed. The idle problem and rich problem is gone. There may be a little hic-up in the idle but I'm good with that and its an old motor. What was the problem? What is the primary sensor that controls A/F ratio??...... THE MAF SENSOR. Yep. The one I replaced mine with was faulty out of the box. If you remember, I also had a mid throttle fuel cut issue, where the engine would stumble under acceleration sometimes. I replaced the MAF with a REFURBISHED napa unit, and that specific problem went away. But not the idle. Tricked me into thinking there was no way it could still be the MAF. Let me tell you fellas, I really appreciate all the ideas, feedback and support on this. It's hard out there for a home mechanic and forums like these really keep a guy going at it. In the end, it cost me $550 for the shop to find the problem and replace the MAF (they did this before calling me) but I'm not complaining. I could have easily spent that or more if I kept throwing parts at it hoping for a fix. Lesson learned. How does occam's razor go? If its the most obvious solution, that's probably the solution? Anyways. Hope this helps some poor fool down the road. I know I learned a lot about system testing and diagnostics. Time to wrap up this car and enjoy it!
    3 points
  3. Been a while. Just checking in to let people know I have decided to let some subaru experts take a look. Hoping 3 hours is plenty of diagnostic time. If they find a solution to the problem I will post it here. This car is 95% complete, just have to button up the interior after I get this idle problem fixed. Thanks all, wish me luck.
    3 points
  4. Usually almost nothing on a good engine. And the name is HIGHLY misleading. They are ABSOLUTELY NOT "Air/Oil Separators" - they are "Air/Liquid Separators" and the distinction is very relevant since engines produce large amounts of condensation during warm up. This is generally directed into the cylinders and burnt by the stock breather system. In an AOS it is saved and mixed with the normal small amount of oil vapor to produce a nasty concoction of milkshake-esque sludge that coats and restricts the normal operation of the PCV and breather system. It is honestly a horrible idea for a street vehicle. Catch cans and AOSs are RACE CAR parts. They can serve a function in a racing environment to solve specific problems related to ulta-high performance engines. These are engines that see intermittent use and have highly accelerated maintenance requirements - part of which is to clean and service these accessory systems to prevent clogging and empty collection vessels, etc. These are NOT appropriate for street use. GD
    2 points
  5. Get the updated separator plate and bolts from Subaru. Yours will be plastic and cracked and leaking. And get a new wrist-pin access plate o-ring from Subaru as well. DO NOT touch the rear main seal unless it is obviously leaking badly. Slight dampness from clutch fibers wicking oil out of the seal is normal. GD
    2 points
  6. Yeah, it's a hack. Appropriate? I dunno... $141 USD (the starting price for Subaru applications) is $188 canuck, plus shipping, and I'm sure it'll be more than the dealer just quoted me for the Baja springs - which I'm sure are the better way to do it.
    2 points
  7. Agree EFI would be nice but this obviates the need for custom wiring, fuel lines, high pressure pump etc and keeps it fairly reversible. I've got the complete wiring loom and ECU for an EJ22 sitting with my other EJ22 for the green sedan so if I can't find another distributor when it comes time to build that motor, then I will probably convert this one to EFI. Yes I believe this part time EJ box has the same transfer section on the back as the ea box so hopefully the tailshaft fits but I did keep the entire legacy drivetrain, axles, rear diff etc just in case. Also kept the front hubs in case I end up 5 stud swapping my silver sedan at some point. Too many projects haha and that's not even mentioning my Nissan 4wd.
    2 points
  8. Not what was asked, but here's a useful tool for oil-filling: You can often find a Turkey Baster at low-cost at dollar-stores. Useful for filling or topping-up of rear-differentials. And can help with adding oil down the dipstick-tube of some manual transmissions.
    2 points
  9. HUGE UPDATE. After 2 years of whines and now a loud rumble I took the car to yet another mechanic. This time he is a retired tire and suspension guy and he diagnosed the problem an old school way. We took the car out on a back road with a hill, he sat in the back seat and as we started down the hill I popped the car in neutral and shut off the engine. Bingo, right rear wheel bearing screaming away. Yesterday he replaced it and the car is now stone quiet, well a little noise from the cupped tires, but I can live with that till the new ones come in the spring when I take the snow tires off. Thanks for all the comments, you guys are great! Mark
    2 points
  10. 2 points
  11. Thank you! I guess 181 +-36 is the correct one. I'll torque it to proper value tomorrow morning.
    2 points
  12. go here: http://jdmfsm.info/Auto/Japan/Subaru/ find your model and year... find the appropriate section. torque specs should be listed
    2 points
  13. Make sure you start the bolts by hand. Very easy to cross thread.
    2 points
  14. My next door neighbor acquired it from a party that had two Justy's for sale @ 500 ea. He said he got it for agreeing to build them a shelf. Apparently my neighbor thought I've had too much free time on my hands? lol.
    2 points
  15. Ball-joint failed! Going around a corner! Horror of horrors! I had a similar failure once, a long time ago, and the thought still haunts me. But it was on an old car, a 1934 Austin, and the ball-joint stem sheared off at the top of the ball, also when going around a bend. But times have moved on since then, and there have been huge advances in metallurgy and in manufacturing techniques since then.
    2 points
  16. The solenoid grounds through the transmission case. Make sure the transmission ground strap is in place and has clean, tight connections with proper star washers to bite through paint. GD
    2 points
  17. Kind of late to the party here, but thanks for documenting all this for others to pick thru when they attempt a EJ swap. If I had seen this when you were working on it, I would have helped out. Kudos to Bennie for being here and helping you thru some rough spots. Real happy that you are willing to go hard on this and do as much possible to get it back on the road, not many of these left. Pretty sure my build is in here, but it was quite a while ago. I might do a update in the Members Ride section. Have a drool rag ready
    2 points
  18. lifetime warranty or lifetime of replacing with aftermarket axles from what is reported hereabouts. swap the front tires R to L and see if the rumble follows the tire. probably best replacing tires as you plan and then start looking for demonic possession if symptoms persist. In the meantime, turn up the radio. common things happen most commonly.
    2 points
  19. Throw away the AOS. Those are for idiots and people with blown engines. Buy all the factory PCV and breather hoses and put it back to stock. Make sure the turbo stay brackets are in place. If those are loose or missing it can lead to flexing of the oil supply line to the turbo and they can crack. Also if you don't know the origin of the tune - get it properly pro-tuned on a dyno before a previous owners bad decision claims your rod bearings. GD
    1 point
  20. Yeah, I know what I'm doing. Engineer accustomed to working on and around dangerous things, etc. Jig it up so it's not going to be inclined to exit in any direction, and only for the purposes of compressing a couple of inches and seeing if the readings that come back make any sense. In this case absolute accuracy isn't even important, as the measurement will tell me whether I can expect a relative improvement between one spring and the next.
    1 point
  21. absolutely. I pour it through a cheap cabin filter or whatever you have laying around. As to the clutch issues I imagine you'll know what's wrong when you take it apart but probably a decent change the fork or pivot have failed.
    1 point
  22. Okay, but now we're going in circles. I originally asked about Forester springs because that's what I recall having been previously discussed. Then someone said "Baja", and now we're going back to the Foresters. From a cost perspective, I'd prefer Foresters because right now there are half a dozen of them in the local P'n'P yards, and as I said above, Bajas would have to be bought new. So is one taller and/or stiffer than the other? Which is preferable from the performance (load) standpoint? The good news (at least for my trailer) is that the tongue weight is spot on - 158 lb., right where it should be.
    1 point
  23. Related? Might want to consider replacing some of the shifter bushings and/or the linkage. Helps w/the sloppy shifter.: There's also the trans mount that can wear out.
    1 point
  24. ...and had Serious Rust issues all around! 😮 However, is always more fun to drive an old slow car, Fast; rather than being driving a Fast car, Slowly... Completely agree with that phrase. in my case, I've had good times swapping better, stronger parts from other cars' brands, to build my "BumbleBeast" as a Reliable car and seems like I achieved my goal long ago, as the Subie tends to not give almost any problem for years... Greetings from Honduras.
    1 point
  25. The correct phrase is “yeah they ain’t worth anything” or “they’re worth nothing”. Can’t have a double negative in a sentence, it’s like multiplying two negatives together. Sorry, just one of my pet hates of our language that I hear many young kids replicate thinking they sound cool. As the the autos, they’re a good base to convert to dual range manual in my book. Generally speaking the auto models are very tidy having been babied their whole life and usually garaged. I love grabbing the rear shafts from autos as they’re usually “unused” as such and are mint for spares. But as GD says, they’re hard to find parts for from the junkyard. Aftermarket service parts still seem to be available enough, at least they are over here for now - we’ll, until we cut ties with China economically we should be “fine”. Cheers Bennie
    1 point
  26. Yeah they aint worth nothin. Especially the auto's. Can't get any parts and those 3AT's were trash. The pump drive splines like to strip out and you can't get the pump drive shafts anymore. All the EA's are what I consider "dead platforms" - there's no parts to drive them regularly. I'm considered an "enthusiast" and an "expert" around here I guess - that's all just an unintentional result of my personal need to maintain and repair my own fleet of vehicles. Once a vehicle can no longer be supported I simply move on. I have no emotional attachment to them - I'm still driving 80's vehicles primarily but I've switched to GM platforms that have HUGE support for parts - both new old stock and reproduction. The Subaru's have no support so their usefulness and thus their value is limited. 20 years ago I drove EA's because they were REALLY cheap and the junk yards were full of parts. Now there's nothing and in any case I'm not a starving college kid anymore and I have no time to haunt junk yards. It boggles my mind that anyone would bother with these vehicles at this point - any amount of research will tell you they are not a viable platform and newer Subaru's have turned into absolute electronic trash. So essentially the entire brand is dead to me. We repair them at my shop because we have the expertise and the experience and there's a HUGE number of them in our area and they are always broken so it's a great business model. It's a terrible choice for the consumer but it makes me a lot of money so 😃 GD
    1 point
  27. I've never used one; not hard to understand how and why it works, but I don't think it's appropriate here. When you look into them, you find assumptions like "pickup truck" and "trailer weight 5000 lb and over", so that suggests that they're pretty severe overkill for this application. I just got back from the scales, and the weight came in at exactly 700kg (1540 lb), which isn't a surprise given the published weights don't include the added front wheel/stand, boat mounts, gear stowed in the sailboat, or (probably) the gas in the jet ski. So the question now is what the actual tongue weight is and whether it can be dialed in to ~150 lb, which is pretty modest. And since it's a 20+ year old car it seems to me that the springs are softer than they should be, so does it make sense to add all that heavy-duty hardware to correct what's really a pretty small deficiency?
    1 point
  28. Active codes are displayed with no connectors. Read memory stored codes uses one set, clear memory uses another. Along with some other steps. With my EA82SPFI engines, I never needed to do either, since 1988.
    1 point
  29. #3 It goes from the egr valve to the cylinder HEAD.
    1 point
  30. Usually it's a short in the wire somewhere. Check for pinch points inside the door (window mechanisms, hinges, etc. It could also be behind the head unit if it's tight back there. You could meter the wire to confirm. The speaker could also be bad, check resistance while the meter is out. You could also just run a new wire in about 20 minutes and probably call it good.
    1 point
  31. Did you inspect the clutch fork for cracks or deformities? Was the clutch an aftermarket kit that included the throw out bearing? I’ve found aftermarket throw out bearings are undersized - only by several mm but every bit counts! And are you sure it was the correct clutch kit? Cheers Bennie
    1 point
  32. Works on 2004 and earlier subarus before the rear sensor became more utilized by the ECU. Pre 2004 the rear sensor data is practically used as just a toggle switch “good” or “not good”. Very good success rate and worth trying in areas that are not asinine on inspections. They’re available premade on eBay for cheap There were also mini catalytic converter like inserts you screw in front of the O2 sensor that had a minuscule amount of catalyst just for the sensor stream. But I haven’t seen one for a few years and I never used those.
    1 point
  33. Hey guys I'm about to yank the engine out of my 89 gl. I bought new lifters for it a while ago and I'm gonna put those in while the motor Is out. Am I supposed to soak them in motor oil for a day or so prior to installation? I had to do that with my camaro lifters, I just don't know if these require it also.
    1 point
  34. Read your codes from the ECU. Decipher them from the list. Go from there. Sounds to me more like one of the following: - bad or dirty AFM - dead O2 sensor - bad/dead coolant temp sensor Don’t go throwing money at it until you know what the codes are Cheers Bennie
    1 point
  35. had a scare last night with it. apparently the passenger ball joint nut dident like being off and on multiple times over the past year and the nut was compromised. went around a corner and the nut popped off the ball joint and it separated. ended up jacking it up there and re assembling the ball joint using a lug nut for the ball joint to get it home. i swapped the lug nut for a standard castle nut with new cotter pin. it had one of those lock nuts on there before. even found the old nut with the threads tore out of it. i read the torque spec for the ball joint is 29.5 ft pound i put it up to 40 ft pound with new nut and a little more for the cotter so im prety sure it should stay put now. so far no at temp light but i havent really driven it far yet.
    1 point
  36. I know that the gasket set may be used for multiple variations, and I may not end up using all of these. I don't want to miss one of these during the assembly stage of my project. I removed the "easy ones" from the picture. A - NOT thermostat (smaller than the included thermostat gasket) B - turbo equipment C - EGR D E F - turbo equipment G - turbo equipment H J K - case plugs? L - case plus for wrist pins? Slightly too big to fit into recessed bore on case! M - compression washer - for what? N O P Q R S - turbo equipment
    1 point
  37. A working converter will generally show a pretty flat rear O2 signal around 700 millivolts. GD
    1 point
  38. Manual control. Heat is consistent throughout. Needs a recharge I’m sure but it’s still a weird one.
    1 point
  39. Bennie, PS "kits" of all the parts needed seem to sell easily for 550. I remember surprise at someone paying 100 and then going for reconditioning costs. I have thrown a few out before then Matey will just have to be content with what he gets or puts away again
    1 point
  40. My understanding is that you're safe in swapping the ECUs, as they're the same in both AT and MT cases, and there's an input (via the connector/harness, of course) that informs it which type of transmission is in place. The (automatic) transmission is managed by a separate controller, the TCU, which communicates with the ECU. I assume you've restored your O2 sensor "mod" to its original state.
    1 point
  41. Yeah, that's a new thing I'm seeing too. I don't like it either - it takes up too much screen real estate. If I want those stats I know where to find them. Who's messing with the configuration and why?
    1 point
  42. Hi jonathan, Thanks for sharing your picker/wrecker experiences. I have a question about viewing these forum posts. Recently, the left frame of my screen has been overtaken with viewing stats. It lists who the top posters are, the most popular days, etc. I can't find any way to remove that from the display. In other words, is it possible to see the posts full screen without them being scrunched to one side by the stats? Thanks for your reply. mrfixiter
    1 point
  43. I can't begin to imagine why.
    1 point
  44. I believe it’s a little more involved than just soaking them, you’ll need to bleed the air out of them - basically pump the HLA in a bath of oil (the little hole on the side needs to be covered) to swap the air that’s in there now for oil. They should go solid once they’re full of oil. Then install. Cheers Bennie
    1 point
  45. I’ve installed legacy springs on outback struts. don’t recall what it did to the overall height as I didn’t install them on a legacy. I’d guess you get a 1” lift instead of 2”.
    1 point
  46. From a 2002 Factory Service Manual: The following color codes are used to indicate the colors of the wires used. Color code Color L Blue B Black Y Yellow G Green R Red W White Br Brown Lg Light green Gr Gray P Pink Or Orange Lb Light Blue V Violet SA Sealed (Inner) SB Sealed (Outer)
    1 point
  47. ^ That's different. Here's Ruby Scoo, still plugging away: and my Brumby (red one) that's still stock with the addition of PS from a touring wagon and aftermarket cruise, they're really the only two changes; white one in the background is my mother inlaw's: Cheers Bennie
    1 point
  48. I'm trying to do the front brake pads on my '83 Subaru Brat. I feel like I recently did front brakes on either my other Brat or my friend's '89 Loyale I helped him find, but I guess not and I can't seem to compress the piston back in to allow room for fresh brake pads. This is the weirdest design, with front-parking-brake that cable-squeezes the front caliper. How to compress piston? I can't seem to turn to the left or the right, and I can't seem to compress with a C-clamp. The pads on my drivers side were worn exactly like |\ one edge of each pad was starting to rub metal, and the other edge still had 1/4" of pad left. I was getting a bad front-wheel shake as soon as I let off heavy throttle or braked lightly.
    1 point
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