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  2. GeneralDisorder

    Er27

    Garbage. Not worth $1 let alone $1200. GD
  3. Eric4

    Er27

    I'm completely new to this and know next to nothing about Subarus. I came across a 2.9l er27 stroker that's supercharger and was built by professionals for a really car anyone know what these engines can handle? How much boost/hp/torque I dont even have a guess the price is $1200 for motor+trans
  4. Today
  5. idosubaru

    Fried ECU

    I’m no expert on timing but definitely time it to non turbo fuel injection specs if they differ. Ive had a 1987 turbo XT for years that I converted to nonturbo. Dropped in a nonturbo engine and nonturbo ECU. It has never run well. Barely drivable. I’ve driven it 30 miles once and that’s it. Bogs and stutters bad. I never figured out if it was a mechanical issue or swap issue. Maybe some Briton isn’t happy with the swap or maybe the gas tank is full of rust. Who knows. But I always suspected some of the wiring or ECU wasn’t happy with me converting it to nonturbo. I wonder if: A: the Turbo ECU isn’t happy with something B: if you swapped ECUs - If the ECU you choose is compatible with the wiring in the vehicle. between carb spfi mpfi flapper and MAF and disty changes jr seems like getting mismatched wiring or ECU is a possibility.
  6. Rampage

    Fried ECU

    Try 8 degrees like the carb. Looking at the valve timing The Turbo cams have the valves open for less duration that the MPFI non-turbo. The valves are open longer with the non-turbo cams. The Turbo forces air into the cylinder so the valves do not have to be open very long. The NA uses the piston to pull air into the cylinder so the valves are open longer. The ECU controls the injectors as to how much fuel is added to the air going in. It kind of makes sense that at higher rpms the pistons cannot pull in enough air and fuel to get a good burn. Or, am I over thinking it. Back in the day, to get more horsepower we used cams ground to open the valve quick and hold it open as long as possible, then close it quick.
  7. OK, I thought about washing and waxing but decided my 2005 Outback with 205,000 miles, CEL 5 codes P0174, 0420, 1155, wheel bearings shot, worn tires, leaking HGs, VC gaskets, power steering pump replacement leaking, brakes worn out, HVAC selector worn and not "selecting" (of issue since all the above mentioned leaking fluids that weren't trailing the car or polluting every place I parked, burnt off on the exhaust and made breathing a challenge in the car) was a car in need of a new car so I traded it in on a 2019 Outback Premium with 8K miles. I'll do just about anything to avoid washing and waxing a car.
  8. Yesterday
  9. I have an Outback, it's a 2018 with a 3.6 liter engine...a friend helped me change the oil yesterday to replace with this: https://www.searchforparts.com/oil-change/subaru-2018-outback-3.6l-ez36d it's a relief because family really ran this vehicle into the ground and nobody maintained it. ok, your turn, tell us anything and everything you did, wax, wash, tires, rims, did you install a new stereo system, did you paint it? specify year and model, thanks!
  10. subaru1988

    Fried ECU

    I've learned the hard way with these cars that timing that is too far advanced will make your car run and idle poorly. At least that was certainly true with my '88 SPFI Wagon. The whole "computer" in these cars complicates it some, at least between the ears, for those of us used to carbs, points, etc. I say that about the computer because in old cars, a vacuum can for a high performance car is different than one for a base car, and so is the total mechanical timing curve. One would think the settings would be different for timing, etc from car model to car model and ECU to ECU since the "computer" supposedly controls ignition advance, at least from what I've read on here. In other words, are you forcing a Turbo ECU to work with a non-Turbo engine? If so, does it really make any difference at any setting, including at idle when you connect the green connectors? Just throwing that out there since timing CAN obviously cause driveability issues. Just in general principle, I'd start at 6 BTDC and go up from there. You'll find the sweet spot with some trial, error, and logging your changes.
  11. 1 Lucky Texan

    Fried ECU

    could need a wider plug gap too.
  12. davepak

    Fried ECU

    You know.. I just had a moment of realization.. So the FSM indicates that ignition timing is 25 degrees BTDC for a Turbo MPFI AT. But now, my car is NO LONGER turbo. I removed the Turbo, I overhauled the engine with the right pistons to make it a non Turbo Car... An EA82 MPFI Naturally Aspirated. So I'm thinking... Should I then set the timing all the way back to 6 degrees BTDC in this case!!??
  13. It's not a freeflowing design, but you can take off the farthest injector to flush it. Use carb cleaner to let it dissolve. At this point just assume your injectors are clogged and look into backflushing them. There are lots of videos on how to do this.
  14. el_freddo

    Fried ECU

    Also, any play in the distributor shaft? Cheers Bennie
  15. Try using some metal glue or permanent locktite on it to fix that ring in place. Cheers Bennie
  16. el_freddo

    Fried ECU

    Are you sure it’s 25 degrees before TDC? I remember my MPFI being 20 degrees BTDC. Might be worth adjusting and seeing if the behaviour changes. Cheers Bennie
  17. I had a few minutes, so I went out with a hose and a funnel stuck on the end to make a "megaphone" so to speak. I found that funnel tip on a Youtube video, thought it was pretty cool to try with the hose suggestion. Anyway, I put the end of the hose ON the idler pulley bolt, no noise. I put it as close as I dared to the DRIVER side tensioner, no noise. Passenger side tensioner, nothing. I did it when I started it at fast idle, and when it was warmed up at an idle while I checked after checking the idle speed (700, no need to mess with the SPFI, luckily). I found this thread...This honestly sounds like my issue, especially this part about hearing an "extra jingle from under the hood". It seems to me like this is quite a rinky dink way of putting a guide on the back of the pulley. According to this, it's safe to cut it off and run it. I don't see why it wouldn't be, as many here run without back belt covers, and the cam sprocket has no guide on it. Who knows how long it's been this way.
  18. davepak

    Fried ECU

    Ongoing tests. Update @idosubaru @Rampage @el_freddo @1 Grumpy @john in KY So the tests continue. I fitted that aftermarket fuel pressure regulator and with that I have realized that the fuel pump was always whining badly before, regardless of which one ( I have 3 fuel pumps to use) when it had the stock fuel pressure regulator. On setting the pressure at about 39 psi give or take I have noticed that the fuel pump STOPS whining (hey, but not always). And realize this should be the normal operation of it. When the fuel pressure regulator was set at 60 psi or more (I know it was a lot!) it would whine. So my conclusion is that the stock regulator was not working fine. Also, there HAS to be some issues related to fuel delivery as I have noticed the changes with the new regulator set at about those 39psi. As if the car is smooth and steady. Nevertheless, it is not near ready, as when I believe the pressure is fine, I still notice some inconsistencies when ramming the gas pedal. There is some sputtering still. Also, I have checked the fuel lines, they all check with their order: delivery, return, evaporation and vacuum. The fuel filter is like the third in line when the car has rolled less than 500 miles due to this sputtering issues. Additionally, I have seen 2 distinct behaviours regarding the fuel pressure: sometimes the needle on the gauge remains totally solid and even lower than the previously set pressure of 39psi. Other times, the needle oscillates but never going further than say 40 psi, nor lower than 36 psi. This makes me suspect some unexpected issues with the fuel pump's electric circuit.. I recall when placing the aftermarket fuel pump, that if its body would touch ground, I would see a tiny spark, almost like a tiny short circuit, but it wouldn't affect much the pump's operation (or so I think) And given the fact that the wiring has TWO wires for ground, I did not think on grounding the pump's body. So what I think I will do now is work on achieving that sweet spot with the pressure regulator. Set the idle at the infamous 800 rpm for AT and review the ignition timing yet again at those 25 degrees BTDC. This car is like adjusting the Large Hadron Collider!! So many sweet spots at the same time for a lousy 71 odd BHP !
  19. Sounds like you've thoroughly gone over this thing so I doubt this is it because you would have already noticed, but....since this isn't normal... I would guess that mysterious ring may be the culprit - there shouldn't be anything movable by touching it residing behind the oil pump sprocket. Maybe it's shaking or rotating or interfering in some way? I can't see the picture at all - I'm just going by your description.
  20. I like the hose idea. I have a good amount of it laying around, and I'll give that a try. The new "pulleys" I put on were just like you said- "a little dragging from the normal grease" with no noise at all. I find it hard to believe one of these would fail with less than 100 miles on it. Actually, a bad bearing wouldn't seem to be a heat related noise (ie. more noise when cold, less when hot) only, right? I was thinking more along the lines of MY perception of engine noise with the car since I'm used to the covers being on. After watching some of Fox's old videos, I've come to the conclusion that these engines aren't exactly quiet runners. That and my car is all I have to go by with what is "normal". No, it's a silver piece right behind the oil pump pulley. Pic below, sorry for the size. It's just there. It's not attached to anything, and it moves around by touching it. I'm just trying to do process of elimination here like taking the drive belts off. As I said in my first post, the covers ARE off. I left them off for shaking all of this down after I put everything together, and I'm glad I did. If I wasn't worried about road salt/mag chloride in the winter, I'd frankly leave them off. As for the distributor shaft, I've checked that distributor A LOT ( had it in and out for other reasons), and it had no play or noise. That was the first place I listened, and it seemed quiet back there, luckily. Lots of good info, and as always, thanks for the input.
  21. Had similar with my '83, was loose distributor shaft.
  22. I dont' think that makes a noticeable audible difference to the extent that you'd wonder "hmmm, is something wrong? The belt guide? It's not loose, bent, or rubbing is it? That guide, or lip, can get bent when people try to pull the sprocket off. If the noise is coming from the front and only the timing belt is causing it - then it sounds like the covers need to come off and hit every bolt of each pulley with a stethscope while it's running.
  23. Unbolt and remove the FPR and try the air on the fuel rail. It should flow through easy. The system runs at 36 PSI using the vacuum. Without the vacuum the pressure is more like 40 something, I think. The fuel pump is capable of close to 80 to 100 psi, so it has a lot of push and a high flow rate. If the car is AWD, it has a saddle gas tank. The return hose goes into the tank and the fuel flows through a jet pump to siphon gas from the other side of the tank and bring it over to the side with the pump. In order to do that, it has to have a good flow out of the FPR.
  24. When I took mine off I couldn't tell any difference. The engine noise was the same to me. I don't think the covers affect noise of the engine.
  25. If the tensioners and idler bearings are good, they will be quiet. Good idea, removeing all of the v belts for a quick check. Usually, the dead bearings I've had feel dry like no grease, or crunchy if really bad. They should feel a little dragging from the normal grease. Try using a pice of 1/2" to 1" ID flexible hose as a stethoscope. Be wary of getting the probe end near anything windy. That should help narrow down the noise source.
  26. So today my little rod broke off (the nut snapped) and now my outer door handle has nothing attached, leaving me to reach inside to open from the ...inside. I have since seen what I need to do, but having a hard time getting the rod back onto the door handle. Any disassembly instructions? I hope I don’t need to remove the glass. Thank you!
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