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Guest Message by DevFuse
 

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Want to replace timing belt myself; any special tools?


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16 replies to this topic

#1 ringe

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Posted 21 April 2004 - 02:27 PM

Hey guys,

Ya'll are generally a good place to go for advice concerning Subarus. I own a 94 Legacy, EJ22 Phase I, I think; at least, I am pretty sure it is non-interference, so I figured I could do this myself without too much risk of grenading the engine.
That said, I have a Chilton's manual, but I don't think they specify the right tools for the job. Would I be alright with your typical wrench set, or do I need some more specific tools for the job? Any other advice on the matter would be appreciated as well.

Regards,

#2 Mike_N_Austin

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Posted 21 April 2004 - 03:05 PM

Check out the link below.

Legacy shared this with me on a previous thread on another topic.

Based on these pictures, it looks like a pretty straightforward job.

He also stated that he removed both of his radiator fans to allow for better clearance....although he did stat that this was not necessary.

http://www.main.expe...ages/timingbelt

#3 ringe

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Posted 21 April 2004 - 03:17 PM

Thanks, I saw those pics, but I guess I missed where he listed the tools he used. :)

#4 Legacy777

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Posted 21 April 2004 - 05:03 PM

I did a little more work then just t-belt.....so I had some extra tools.....mainly the camshaft holder tool. The t-belt alone is pretty straight forward. The oddball things you may need is a big socket for the crank pulley. I would highly recommend you have a vice to recompress the tensioner.....or buy a new one. It needs to be compressed very slowly, and short of a vice.....it's near to impossible to compress it.

The other hiccup which can sometimes happen is keeping the motor from moving while you're trying to loosen the crank pulley. If you have a MT. Have someone get in the car, put it in 5th, and step on the brakes while you loosen the pulley. If you have an auto, there is an access hole on the bell housing, which you can stick a pry bar or breaker bar in there to catch the back side of the flex plate.

here's pics
http://www.main.expe...rs/DCP_2486.JPG
http://www.main.expe...rs/DCP_2487.JPG
http://www.main.expe...rs/DCP_2488.JPG

That's pretty much it.

Oh....just a clarification.....you pretty much NEED to take the radiator fans out to get enough room. I was referring to the radiator itself....some people opt to take it out.......I didn't think it was necessary.

#5 Tiny Clark

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Posted 22 April 2004 - 04:01 AM

I just did my water pump, front crank seal, resealed the oil pump (with good old Permatex #2) and did pull the radiator. With the extra room I got out of it, it was worth the half hour to pull it.

One observation I did note from the book for the timing belt change...

The book said to align the marks on the belt with the cam and crank marks. So, I was surprised that the marks weren't lined up when I pulled the covers off and turned the crank over a few times. So I just lined the crank and cam marks to where they are supposed to be and put the new belt on with the marks matched up.

After I got the new belt on, I cranked the thing over by hand, with the plugs pulled, about 15 times, and the marks on the belt never lined up with the crank/cam marks again. I don't know how many turns it would take to get them to come back into alignment, but I didn't want to spend all day bending over the engine.

#6 Legacy777

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Posted 22 April 2004 - 08:18 AM

See.....the marks on my belt never lined up with the marks on the pullies either. I think it really doesn't matter......you can either line up the marks on the cams & crank......or just put the belt on and make sure that the marks on the timing belt match before and after. I ended up lining up the cams & crank and put the belt on that way......

I wonder if subaru techs are trained to do it another way?

#7 mike golin

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Posted 22 April 2004 - 09:59 PM

the oem subie timing belt has white stripes and a dotted stripe which line up with the crank and cam marks. this just makes it quicker . i put white marks on the crank sprocket and the cams [crank sprocket has a mark that lines up with a indent on the crankshaft sensor boss - straight up position. the crank keyway should be at the bottom ]. i use spring clamps to hold the belt on the sprockets which makes it go much easier .

the crankshaft bolt is 7/8 inch. make sure you put some blue locktite on the crank bolt and torque it to 130 ft/lbs. On a man trans I have a hook bar that catches the ring gear teeth to hold it . go through the access hole in the bell housing.

#8 ringe

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Posted 29 April 2004 - 02:21 PM

:) Wow, thanks for all the good advice guys. I will probably do it this summer, around July since that will be the first time that I get a chance to do this sort of work without interruptions. I will let you know how it goes. Thanks!


Roy

#9 avk

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Posted 29 April 2004 - 05:16 PM

The number of camshaft turns needed for the marks to re-align equals the number of teeth on the timing belt. The number of crankshaft turns is twice that. Not very practical. This is assuming that the no. of teeth on the cam sprocket and the no. of teeth on the belt have no common factors beyond 1 (for even wear, like ring and pinion in the diff.).

#10 hklaine

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Posted 29 April 2004 - 10:43 PM

I am looking to do this job also, hopefully in the next week or two. Just have to decide if I want to dedicate a day to this or the clutch first.

I have read a good number of posts but want to go into this being as educated as possible so I have a few questions.

Cam Seals: cam seal vs. cam retainer o-ring? Two separate parts or are they a kit?

How are the cam sprockets removed?

Reseal oil pump? Remove pump and replace a seal/o-ring? Permatex #2? Where is this applied?

Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks.

-Heikki

#11 Tiny Clark

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Posted 30 April 2004 - 06:22 AM

My oil pump did not have a gasket. It was sealed with what seemed like silicone.

There is a 3/4" o-ring between the pump and engine housing, most probably for the pump output, but I didn't look at it that close. The o-ring had sealant residue all the way around it on the main housing, so it appears even if the o-ring leaked, it would not make it past the housing. I didn't have a new o-ring, so I used the old one.

If you don't want it to leak, I would suggest permatex #2. If you don't have latex gloves, don't worry, the stuff will eventually wear off your hands.

#12 hklaine

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Posted 30 April 2004 - 07:40 AM

I am assuming this is different from regular Permatex? Where is it available? Common auto parts store? Color? Thanks.

-Heikki

#13 Legacy777

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Posted 30 April 2004 - 10:25 AM

http://main.experien...ru_sealants.gif

#14 hklaine

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Posted 30 April 2004 - 11:41 AM

Josh.

Do you have any advice on my other questions (a few posts up)?

This engine is somewhat new to me, my first non-EA81/2.

-Heikki

#15 Tiny Clark

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Posted 30 April 2004 - 01:02 PM

This has been around a long time, maybe they changed the numbers, but Permatex #1 was hardening, and #2 was non-hardening, but not by much. It is dark brown. Any NAPA should have it.

#16 Legacy777

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Posted 30 April 2004 - 02:08 PM

cam seals are just the seal....pull old one out....put new one in....there's really not two parts. The rear of the pass side has an o-ring instead of seal.....but no biggy. The driver's side front does have a small extension that uses an o-ring between it and the head....but I didn't replace that on my job.

cam sprockets are held on by a bolt.....loosen bolt...remove sprocket. There is a special tool to hold the sprockets......if you don't have one, you can maybe use a strap wrench or an old t-belt to keep it from moving.

remove pump....clean it up....you should use permatex gray. The #2 stuff is the anearobic stuff....which may work, but I used what the document that I posted said. The stuff that was removed was similar to a silicone....not the anearobic stuff.

these should help
http://main.experien...mp_install1.jpg
http://main.experien...mp_install2.jpg

I am looking to do this job also, hopefully in the next week or two. Just have to decide if I want to dedicate a day to this or the clutch first.

I have read a good number of posts but want to go into this being as educated as possible so I have a few questions.

Cam Seals: cam seal vs. cam retainer o-ring? Two separate parts or are they a kit?

How are the cam sprockets removed?

Reseal oil pump? Remove pump and replace a seal/o-ring? Permatex #2? Where is this applied?

Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks.

-Heikki



#17 hklaine

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Posted 30 April 2004 - 06:53 PM

The pictures are worth a thousand words. Thanks for all the info.

-Heikki




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