Jump to content


Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, my lurker friend!

Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, an unparalleled Subaru community full of the greatest Subaru gurus and modders on the planet! We offer technical information and discussion about all things Subaru, the best and most popular all wheel drive vehicles ever created.

We offer all this information for free to everyone, even lurkers like you! All we ask in return is that you sign up and give back some of what you get out - without our awesome registered users none of this would be possible! Plus, you get way more great stuff as a member! Lurk to lose, participate to WIN*!
  • Say hello and join the conversation
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Classifieds with all sorts of Subaru goodies
  • Photo hosting in our gallery
  • Meet other cool people with cool cars
Seriously, what are you waiting for? Make your life more fulfilling and join today! You and your Subaru won't regret it, we guarantee** it.

* The joy of participation and being generally awesome constitutes winning
** Not an actual guarantee, but seriously, you probably won't regret it!

Serving the Subaru Community since May 18th, 1998!

Guest Message by DevFuse
 

- - - - -

91 Loyal timing belt replacement


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_Loyal91_*

Guest_Loyal91_*
  • Guests

Posted 01 March 2002 - 07:49 PM

Can anyone help me with the timing of my 91 Loyale after breaking a timing belt? I lost driver's side belt and have it all apart with 2 new belts ready to go in. What is the first thing I should do? How do I rotate the camshafts? Where should the timing marks on the camshafts be. Is one at 12 o'clock and one at 6 o'clock? Do I first line up some marks on the flywheel? which ones, etc? Thanks. I live in the woods of Maine and can't get to a store to get a book. Lucky it broke in the yard.

#2 Guest_dlsm_*

Guest_dlsm_*
  • Guests

Posted 01 March 2002 - 11:58 PM

. This is what alldata has, I edited it some. Now would be a good time to change the water pump, too. To get the crankshaft pulley off you can put a breaker bar and a length of pipe on the pulley bolt and wedge the pipe against the driver's side of the underneath of the car and bump the starter. I did this and one very quick bump was enough.
REMOVAL
1)You will need to remove the radiator, drive belts, oil dipstick, crankshaft pulley, fans, and I think that is about it from the front of the engine.
2) Remove belt covers LH, RH and FR.
3) The flywheel has marks on it under the rubber cover for the ignition timing and the valve timing. The ign timing marks have numbers - DON"T USE THESE. There is another set of three lines without numbers, put the centerline lined up with the pointer this will set the position of the crank.
4) To time the cams to the crank a spanner wrench is good for turning the cams and the crank. The cams have a mark on them that needs to be lined up with the notch on the rear timing covers on each side, it will make sense when you see it. One cam mark will be up when the other cam mark is down, the marks should be 180 degrees apart if set correctly.
9) Removing timing belt
(1) Loosen tensioner mounting bolts on #1 cylinder by 1/2 turn.
(2) With tensioner fully turned to slacken belt, tighten mounting bolts.
(3) Mark rotating direction of timing belt, then remove belt.
(4) Loosen tensioner No.2 mounting bolts on #2 cylinder by 1/2 turn.
(5) With tensioner fully rotated to slacken belt by using TENSIONER WRENCH, tighten tensioner mounting bolts.
NOTE: Cover TENSIONER WRENCH clamping tips with a rubber hose or waste cloth to prevent crankshaft or pulley from being damaged.
unless you are doing the camshaft or crankshaft oil seals you don't have to remove the sprockets.
(7) Remove timing belt after marking rotating direction of belt.
(:cool: Remove crankshaft sprocket No.2.
10) Remove tensioner and tensioner No.2 together with tensioner spring.
11) Remove belt idler.
12) Remove camshaft sprockets by using CAMSHAFT SPROCKET WRENCH.
13) Remove right-hand belt cover No.2, left-hand belt cover No.2 and belt cover RR.

TIMING BELT

1) Check timing belt teeth for breaks, cracks, and wear. If any fault is found, replace belt.
2) Check the condition of back side of belt; if any crack is found, replace belt.
NOTE:
Be careful not to let oil, grease or coolant contact the belt. Remove quickly and thoroughly if this happens.
Do not bend the belt sharply. [The bending radius must be greater than 60 mm (2.36 in) .]
When replacing belt, be sure to replace both belts as a matched set.

TIMING BELT TENSIONER
1) Check tensioner roller for smooth rotation. Replace roller if noise or excessive play is noted.
2) Measure the out-of-squareness of tensioner roller H. If it exceeds 0.5 mm (0.020 in) , replace roller.

BELT IDLER

Check idler for smooth rotation. Replace if noise or excessive play is noted.

INSTALLATION

1) Install belt cover seal LH No.3 to cylinder block.
2) Install belt cover LH seal, belt cover No.4 LH seal, and belt cover mount to belt cover RR, then install to cylinder block.
Tightening torque:
4.4 - 5.4 N-m (0.45 - 0.55 kg-m, 3.3 - 4.0 ft-lb)
3) Install belt cover No.2 LH seal and belt cover mounts to belt cover No.2 LH, then install to cylinder head and camshaft case.
Tightening torque:
4.4 - 5.4 N-m (0.45 - 0.55 kg-m, 3.3 - 4.0 ft-lb)
4) Install belt cover RH seal, belt cover No.2 RH seal, and belt cover mounts to belt cover No.2 RH, then install to cylinder head and camshaft case.
Tightening torque:
4.4 - 5.4 N-m (0.45 - 0.55 kg-m, 3.3 - 4.0 ft-lb)
5) Install camshaft sprockets to right and left camshafts. To lock camshaft, use CAMSHAFT SPROCKET WRENCH.
NOTE: Tighten bolts gradually in two or three steps until the specified torque is attained.
Tightening torque:
9.1 - 10.5 N-m (0.93-1.07 kg-m, 6.7 - 7.7 ft-lb)
6) Installing tensioner
(1) Attach tensioner spring to tensioner, then install to cylinder block RH. Tighten bolts temporarily by hand.
(2) Attach tensioner spring to bolt, tighten bolt (A), and then loosen 1/2 turn.
(3) Push down tensioner until it stops, then tighten temporarily bolt (B).
7) Installing tensioner No.2
(1) Attach tensioner spring to tensioner No.2, then install the tensioner No.2 to cylinder block LH. Tighten bolts temporarily by hand.
(2) Attach tensioner spring to bolt, tighten bolt © then loosen 1/2 turn.
(3) Raise tensioner No.2 using TENSIONER WRENCH (499007000) until it stops. then tighten bolt (D) temporarily.
NOTE: Cover the tip of tensioner wrench with a rubber hose or waste cloth to prevent crankshaft or pulley from being damaged.
:cool: Install belt idler to cylinder block, using care not to turn over seal.
Tightening torque:
39 - 47 N-m (4.0 - 4.8 kg-m, 29 - 35 ft-lb)
9) Install timing belt.
(1) Install sprocket No.2 and sprocket to crankshaft.
NOTE: Sprocket No.2 can be identified by the absence of dowel pin.
(2) Install crankshaft pulley to crankshaft, and tighten bolt temporarily.
(3) Align the center of three lines scribed on the flywheel with timing mark on flywheel housing.
(4) Align timing mark on camshaft sprocket LH with notch in belt cover.
(5) Attach timing belt No.2 to crankshaft sprocket No. 2, oil pump sprocket, belt idler, camshaft sprocket, in that order, avoiding downward slackening of the belt.
(6) Loosen tensioner No.2 tightening bolt (D) by 1/2 turn to apply tension to belt.
(7) Push timing belt by hand to ensure smooth movement of tensioner.
(:cool: Apply the specified torque to camshaft sprocket in counterclockwise direction using BELT TENSION WRENCH. While applying torque, tighten tensioner No. 2 bolt (D) temporarily, then tighten bolt © temporarily.
NOTE: When torquing sprocket, be extremely careful not to apply excessive force to it Excessive belt tension will greatly reduce belt life.
Belt Tension: 147 - 245 N-m (33 - 55 ft-lb)
Torque to cam sprocket: 24 - 25 N-m (18 ft-lb)
(9) Tighten bolt (D) and bolt © in that order, to the specified torque.
Tightening torque:
17.2 - 20.1 N-m (1.75 -2.05 kg-m, 12.7 - 14.8 ft-lb)
(10) Ascertain that flywheel timing mark and camshaft sprocket LH timing mark are in their normal positions.
(11) Turn crankshaft one turn clockwise from the position where timing belt No.2 was installed, and align the center of three lines scribed on the flywheel with timing mark on flywheel housing.
(12) Align timing mark on camshaft sprocket RH with the notch in belt cover.
(13)Attach timing belt to crankshaft sprocket and camshaft sprocket, avoiding slackening of belt on the upper side.
(14) Loosen tensioner bolt (B) 1/2 turn to apply tension to belt.
(15) Push timing belt by hand to ensure smooth tensioner movement.
(16) Apply the specified torque (same as camshaft sprocket LH) to camshaft sprocket RH in counterclockwise direction using BELT TENSION WRENCH. While applying torque, tighten tensioner No.2 bolt 3b. temporarily, then tighten bolt a temporarily.
(17) Tighten bolt (B) and bolt (A) in that order, to the specified torque.
Tightening torque:
17.2 - 20.1 N-m (1.75 - 2.05 kg-m, 12.7 - 14.8 ft-lb)
(1:cool: Make sure that flywheel timing mark and camshaft sprocket RH timing mark are in their normal positions.
(19) Remove crankshaft pulley.
NOTE: Do not remove sprocket with crankshaft pulley.
10) Install belt cover FR seal, belt cover RR seal, and belt cover plug to belt cover FR, then install belt cover FR to cylinder block.
NOTE: Before installing belt cover, ensure that no foreign matter such as nut or washer is in it.
11) Install belt covers LH and RH.
12) Install belt cover plate. TURBO model]
13) Install crank pulley to crankshaft using FLYWHEEL STOPPER (498277000) [manual transmission model] or DRIVE PLATE STOPPER (498497000) [automatic transmission model] to lock crankshaft.
Tightening torque:
89 - 107 N-m (9.1 - 10.9 kg-m, 66 - 79 ft-lb)
14) Install water pump pulley and pulley cover to water pump assembly, and tighten nuts temporarily.
15) Install oil level gauge and gauge guide. Apply engine oil to 0-ring beforehand.
16) Connect lead to oil pressure switch.
17) Install V-belt and apply proper tension to the belt.
1:cool: Tighten water pump pulley mounting nuts or bolts to the specified torque.
Tightening torque:
9.1 - 10.5 N-m (0.93 - 1.07 kg-m, 6.7 - 7.7 ft-lb)
Hope this is more helpful than confusing,
Doris

#3 Guest_lenhorn_*

Guest_lenhorn_*
  • Guests

Posted 02 March 2002 - 12:36 AM

members.aol.com/k9collars2/bru/timeb.jpg

#4 Guest_dlsm_*

Guest_dlsm_*
  • Guests

Posted 02 March 2002 - 09:43 AM

So it didn't look so long at 10:45 to my sleep deprived brain. I am sure that I still forgot something.
Doris

#5 Guest_Loyal91_*

Guest_Loyal91_*
  • Guests

Posted 02 March 2002 - 05:27 PM

Thanks to those who took the time to help me get my Suby running again. It is very much appreciated....Lloyd

#6 Left_coast*9

Left_coast*9

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 183 posts
  • Bonney Lake

Posted 19 October 2004 - 01:57 PM

See post #2 in this thread from waaay back. Where can I get a tensioner wrench at a decent price? I am having a really hard time lining up the cam sprocket holes with the hole in the timing belt cover and I think this wrench will help a ton. How about the camshaft sprocket wrench? Hopefully these are not special order items. Thanks a ton.

#7 MorganM

MorganM

    Do you Subaru?

  • Members
  • 8,390 posts
  • TwinCities

Posted 19 October 2004 - 02:19 PM

Tensioner wrench? What's that fancy thang? :-p

Really tho you don't need any special tools to do a timing belt job on these little guys. I just did 2 timing belts in the street last weekend. Only used a 10mm, 12mm, 14mm,, 22mm, screw drivers, and a bottle of water.

Make those tensioner pullies do their job! Hold them tight against the belt as you tighten them down. Just like you do on an alternator ;)

For spinning the cam just put on a belt that isnt really that tight, slip the crank pulley bolt on and roll over the engine with your breaker bar + 22mm socket untill the cam is lined up how you want. Then do the other cam seperately. Once they are lined up continue on!

#8 canajun2eh

canajun2eh

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 222 posts
  • Ottawa, ON, Canada

Posted 19 October 2004 - 02:27 PM

Do one side at a time. You can't keep the camshaft in one place when the timing hole is pointing down. Be sure to use the middle of the three scribed lines as the back of the engine.

Line up marks on left (distributor) side first, and install belt. Tension belt too. Turn engine through several turns, stopping on even count and re-check the marks for this side. Correct as necessary.

Turn engine through an odd number of turns, line up marks on right side, and install belt. Tension belt and then turn engine through several turns, stopping on even count and re-check the marks for the right side. Correct as necessary.

Use a ratchet wrench with 22 mm socket on the crank bolt. That makes it really easy to turn the engine through the required turns (clockwise when viewed front-to-back).

#9 NorthWet

NorthWet

    Eeyore Incarnate

  • Members
  • 5,039 posts
  • Bremerton, WA

Posted 19 October 2004 - 02:31 PM

See post #2 in this thread from waaay back. Where can I get a tensioner wrench at a decent price? I am having a really hard time lining up the cam sprocket holes with the hole in the timing belt cover and I think this wrench will help a ton. How about the camshaft sprocket wrench? Hopefully these are not special order items. Thanks a ton.


I've never used anything other than my hands to push tensioner to max-slack point. Maybe I'm a baaad boy, but didn't seem to matter. Camshaft sprocket wrench as described in writeup also is not absolutely necessary (unless I misread), as long as you can tighten the sprocket attachment bolts.

The belt tension wrench is a different matter, since it could/does affect the belt alignment and tension a little. All it needs to be is a plate with 2 pins/bolts sticking out that stick into holes in the periphery of the cam sprocket, and a bolt head or similar near its center that you can put a wrench/socket on. I made one using an electrical outlet box cover and a few bolts. (I also misread the torque spec and made it strong enough for 120FT-lbs!!! :lol: ) Any sort of pin-wrench that you can put a little counter-torque on the sprocket really should do.

#10 MorganM

MorganM

    Do you Subaru?

  • Members
  • 8,390 posts
  • TwinCities

Posted 19 October 2004 - 03:00 PM

you need NO special tools for this job...

#11 NorthWet

NorthWet

    Eeyore Incarnate

  • Members
  • 5,039 posts
  • Bremerton, WA

Posted 19 October 2004 - 03:13 PM

... Make those tensioner pullies do their job! Hold them tight against the belt as you tighten them down. Just like you do on an alternator ;) ...

Gee, I usually use a breaker bar to set my alt-belt tension... can i do that with the belt? :grin: Just kidding.

I agree with your comment about not needing any special tools. But sometimes "by the book" is a good way to do the first one... then you can figure out what is BS! :lol:

#12 Left_coast*9

Left_coast*9

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 183 posts
  • Bonney Lake

Posted 19 October 2004 - 03:45 PM

I know guys, it seems really lame that I can't get the damn belt lined up. I have no problem getting it on/off, but it is REALLY REALLY tight and every time I try to loop the belt around the camshaft the sprocket moves a little and misaligns. I have even started with it misaligned in every conceivable combination hoping the belt will pull the cam sprocket into aligment with the timing belt cover tic when I'm done but it's never dead-on lined up. I'll get it, it's just super stubborn.
Haynes says to start with the driver's side belt (duhhh) and put the belt on the tensioner, crankshaft, oil pump pulley, and idler pulley in that order. Allow any slack (yeah right) to exist under the tensioner, and keep the belt tight along the bottom. Then pull the belt over the camshaft sprocket and voila. As I described above though, the sprocket moves ever so slightly as the tensioner pulls the slack out. That's why I was thinking a camshaft or tensioner wrench would help to keep is steady.

I think my next option, like Northwet said, is to put together a pipe or something with two screws that will insert into the holes in the camshaft to keep it from moving. ALSO, I will try to tighten the tensioner in the uppermost position to keep it from forcing the belt downwards (and hence moving the camshaft out of alignment).

#13 NorthWet

NorthWet

    Eeyore Incarnate

  • Members
  • 5,039 posts
  • Bremerton, WA

Posted 19 October 2004 - 03:57 PM

... ALSO, I will try to tighten the tensioner in the uppermost position to keep it from forcing the belt downwards (and hence moving the camshaft out of alignment).


Ummmm... does this mean that you have NOT been tightening the tensioner in the "totally loose" position while slipping on the t-belt? :-\

And as far as "lame", we all had our first one, too. I was even lamer because I had no guidance beyond Haynes.

#14 Left_coast*9

Left_coast*9

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 183 posts
  • Bonney Lake

Posted 19 October 2004 - 04:47 PM

Ummmm... does this mean that you have NOT been tightening the tensioner in the "totally loose" position while slipping on the t-belt? :-\

And as far as "lame", we all had our first one, too. I was even lamer because I had no guidance beyond Haynes.

I think I acutally tried it but as soon as I released the tensioner, it pulled the camshaft sprocket out of alignment. Again. I'll play around with it tonight some more.

#15 canajun2eh

canajun2eh

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 222 posts
  • Ottawa, ON, Canada

Posted 19 October 2004 - 05:59 PM

That "ever so slightly" movement is unavoidable. That's why I advise re-checking the alignment after the belt is properly tensioned.

"Ever so slightly" isn't important. However, you must be absolutely sure that you're not out by a tooth or more. Remember that the relative position of the crank and camshafts is governed by the number of teeth in the short length of cam belt between the crank and cam sprockets. You can only adjust this position one tooth at a time, and the distance between teeth on the belt is constant.

#16 Birddog

Birddog

    New User

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
  • Stuarts Draft,Va.

Posted 19 October 2004 - 07:24 PM

Tensioner wrench? What's that fancy thang? :-p

Really tho you don't need any special tools to do a timing belt job on these little guys. I just did 2 timing belts in the street last weekend. Only used a 10mm, 12mm, 14mm,, 22mm, screw drivers, and a bottle of water.

Make those tensioner pullies do their job! Hold them tight against the belt as you tighten them down. Just like you do on an alternator ;)

For spinning the cam just put on a belt that isnt really that tight, slip the crank pulley bolt on and roll over the engine with your breaker bar + 22mm socket untill the cam is lined up how you want. Then do the other cam seperately. Once they are lined up continue on!

What was the water for?Posted Image

#17 Left_coast*9

Left_coast*9

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 183 posts
  • Bonney Lake

Posted 20 October 2004 - 08:45 AM

Thanks, Canajun -- I was able to get them on, altho they're not DEAD ON PERFECT. I should be good to go as soon as I get the ignition timing set correctly.

#18 MorganM

MorganM

    Do you Subaru?

  • Members
  • 8,390 posts
  • TwinCities

Posted 20 October 2004 - 10:40 AM

What was the water for?Posted Image


For me :drunk:

#19 grizz3000

grizz3000

    New User

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Bennett

Posted 28 August 2007 - 11:13 PM

90 Loyale, 1.8, non-turbo

Just finished a complete gasket job (took engine out) and now she won't start.

I've triple checked my belt alignments, compression stroke on #1 at TDC, plug wire to cylinder layout, I have spark at each plug, and gas smell from the top of the intake.

I can't seem to find the 'top' alignment mark on the distributor to ensure it's pointing at 'true' #1. I've found the indentation mark near the gear, but the book says there is another one on the body?

Any hints/lessons learned on getting the timing back in order would be MUCH appreciated!

Eric




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users