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Outback Windshield Replacement - Opinions


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6 replies to this topic

#1 onangaf

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 07:36 AM

2004 Subaru Outback - 8,000+/- miles.
A rock hit my windshield and left a star burst about the size of a nickel.
A local glass company came and sealed up the star burst.
The star burst is located about in the middle of the passenger side windshield.
To replace the whole windshield is about $350.

The money to replace the whole windshield is not an issue.
The question is (opinion) with the money not being an issue would you
go ahead and replace the windshield, or would you just leave it alone
because a replaced windshield will never have the same water tight seal
as the original factory seal, and you'd just be asking for water seal problems in the future.

Your opinions please.

#2 RallyKeith

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 07:51 AM

If it ain't broke don't fix it. :drunk: Your windsheild isn't cracked down the middle, and the professionals have already fixed it. The crack isn't in your immediate view so that isn't a problem either. So then why shell out $350 for something that could be hit by a rock at ANY time? Who is to say another stone won't get kicked up the day after you get the new windsheild installed a break that one? That's how I look at it. Also, it's actually a rope type caulk sealer that is used. Comes in a roll and is simply run around the edge of the windsheild. Pretty easy, so the seal isn't really an issue.

Keith

#3 Sydfloyd44

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 11:40 PM

The "rope type" seal you are talking of is called butyl tape. It is not only against all auto glass industry standards, but it is also against federal law to use. It will not keep the windshield in nor keep the roof up in a roll over accident, and as some find out, this can be deadly. Urethane is the only adhesive.

Keith gave you some good advice. If the repair worked, stick with it! If you don't have to replace it, don't. The biggest problem these days is from "hacks" who replace windshields and don't do the simple things like priming the scratches caused during the replacement process. (among many other things)These are never seen by anyone but the installer, but if not primed properly, you will have major rust issues in the future. Stick with a reputable, LOCAL company if you do end up with a replacement.

One last thing.... Most think that when a windshield is replaced, you 'might' never have the tight, solid seal under the windshield. Believe it or not, there are more and more cases these days of bond failures from factory. Some are failures of the paint to the primer (e-coat) and some are the adhesive to the paint. When replaced by a GOOD, REPUTABLE company, they will actually make the seal better than factory by correcting the problem.
GM recently recalled a bunch of the 2005 Trailblazers, Isuzu Ascenders and another model which I forget at the moment for windshield bond failure. We have been replacing them by the dozens for local dealerships.

#4 thingol

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 09:17 AM

I would replace it. I had a small starburst in my windshield, and less than 4 months later it cracked across the entire windshield. Of course, I have no-deductible comprehensive glass insurance, so it was free for me.

Regarding the new windshield never sealing, I think this is a non-issue, as long as you (as stated above) use a REPUTABLE, LOCAL shop to do it. I have not had any leaking or rust issues for the last 2 years with the one I had replaced, but the company I used has a very good reputation.

Just my opinion.

#5 dpoppeli

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 10:28 AM

I agree with others... don't fix it since it ain't broke and it's practically new and probably very clear otherwise. I had the same issue on a '02, had it sealed as well. If it grows later I'll address it then. Anyway, now you look like you've actually been in the outback.

[quote name='onangaf']2004 Subaru Outback - 8,000+/- miles.
A rock hit my windshield and left a star burst about the size of a nickel...

#6 RallyKeith

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 10:49 AM

The "rope type" seal you are talking of is called butyl tape. It is not only against all auto glass industry standards, but it is also against federal law to use. It will not keep the windshield in nor keep the roof up in a roll over accident, and as some find out, this can be deadly. Urethane is the only adhesive.


Intersting. I did some research and I'm not sure that what we used was butyl tape. What I found a lot of information on was foam cored. I know what we used was not foam cored. Anyhow, that is one of the biggest changes in auto design. Windsheilds are a structural part of the car these days. Fortunatley, the windsheilds I've replaced are in a race car with a full roll cage, so if in fact it was butyl tape that was used we aren't in any MORE danger than we already are. :headbang:

Keith

#7 Sydfloyd44

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 10:03 PM

You are correct Keith. It is actually "Foam Core Butyl Tape". The ONLY location this has been approved for is a "fixed encapsulated" location. Meaning, there are bolts built into a frame on the glass that is the main source of attachment. The foam core butyl is strictly there to create a water tight seal. Ford is the most common for this. Sliders and quarter glasses. Foam core has not been out that long. Regular Butyl tape is just solid and it is what you are speaking of. Comes on a roll with thin paper keeping it from sticking to itself.

It is also quite commonly used in certain types of race cars. Only if they have a full roll cage though. (unless you are doing some "crazy racing") Race cars are also not under FMVSS. Urethane does create a much more rigid body to the vehicle which is something butyl cannot do. (new VW's and Audi's use a special adhesive called High Modulus which is because they now use the windshield as further body support than in the past)

Funny, I see you are from Reading. York here. My mother lives in Denver my sister lives in Bernville. I get up to Cabelas quite often. Small world!




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