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Coasting?


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32 replies to this topic

#26 Gnuman

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Posted 12 January 2006 - 07:41 PM

When I took my drivers license test, growing up in Alaska, I would have passed with no marks except for I coasted to a stop at a light. I was told by my instructor that I should have downshifted from 3rd to 2nd, that coasting to a stop in 1st was okay but its illegal to remove the car from gear and coast.

So Alaska is one state, and im sure there are plenty of others. I doubt you'll get a ticket for coasting, but if you loose control of your vehicle on a downhill slope, and veer off the freeway and cause an accident... im sure you'll be cited for coasting :)

I wont try to explain why its safer to remain in gear. Anybody who has any bit of common sence should be able to understand why.

-Brian


Thanks, Brian. I was away from the computer for a bit as I was taking my Subaru on a road trip. (Theye love it when you do that, or at least mine does)

CA is annother, and IIRC, Virginia. Coasting is not the kind of driving law that they make bilboards about (like speeding or DUI), but if something happens while coasting you will be cited. When coasting down a grade, you will tend to speed up, and need to hit your brakes more often, causing them to heat up and wear faster. If you just remain in gear the usage of your brakes will be greatly reduced, and your control increased. OK so far this discussion has centered around manual transmissions. On an Auto tranny, when you reengage the tranny (moving the shifter from N to D) you get a massive sudden buildup of force that can break the tires loose from the road, or even do significant damage to the tranny itself. All in all, for either drive system, it is just not worth it.

#27 beezer

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Posted 12 January 2006 - 08:08 PM

In my owners manual in the manual trans part, it has written in bold letters "never coast in neutral". I would say they put that in there for a reason, what the exact reasons are I don't know. They recommend to downsift to use the engine as a brake.

That should probably answer the question.



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#28 Mr Fishums

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Posted 13 January 2006 - 09:19 AM

We do not teach people to coast in neutral here, but I have never heard of it being illegal to coast in neutral, with a standard tranny in New York.

I do know that it is a law for tactor trailers to stay in gear on down grades, and to use lower gears. Seeing as their brakes do heat up, and fail under the weights they haul. They also have a JAKE brake as well that is specificly designed for engine braking.

#29 LosDiosDeVerde86

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Posted 13 January 2006 - 02:17 PM

holding the clutch in won't wear any springs or the pressure plate are anything. you're not holding it long enough to weaken the springs.

all that said before is just being WAY too over-cautious

#30 beezer

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Posted 13 January 2006 - 02:43 PM

I was kind of wondering here. In the owners manual, under towing, it says not to tow an awd faster than 30 kph and no more than 50km.(with all 4 wheels on the ground)

As far as I can see towing and coasting are pretty much the same thing right?
So why would they recomend this, is it a safety issue or can it cause damage to the drivetrain somehow?


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#31 Tiny Clark

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Posted 13 January 2006 - 03:27 PM

holding the clutch in won't wear any springs or the pressure plate are anything. you're not holding it long enough to weaken the springs.

all that said before is just being WAY too over-cautious


Depends on how long the hills are and how often you keep the clutch in mano.

#32 Urban Coyote

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 10:47 AM

Hey Guys,

I really appreciate all the feedback and thoughts on the subject. I tried taking the car out of gear and coasting with the clutch out and it just did not feel in control at all....didn't like that in the least, so I won't be doing that anymore.

Besides, I want to stay in control as I barrel down the highway in my ultra-light, gas efficient Subaru as I try to avoid the flaming, jackknifed tractor trailer out of control behind me! :lol:

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#33 Tiny Clark

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 02:07 PM

Now that's funny right there, I don't care who y'are.




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