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That could also be a 2.0 version of that engine.  Could even be an 1.8

 

JDM market had alot of them.  Heads, timing belt, everything else is the same but smaller displacememtn.

 

Look below the alternator at the front of the block.  Will say either EJ18, EJ20, or EJ22.

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That could also be a 2.0 version of that engine.  Could even be an 1.8

 

absolutely.

look for the casting in the block to see for sure.

but i doubt / hope a JDM seller would not make that mistake,

assuming it came from an importer.

 

definitely is a 90 - 95 block = dual port exhaust heads.

no EGR = not required in the JDM

if obd 1 vs. 2 is an issue just buy a 95 ej22 intake manifold.

if you get one with EGR, you will avoid any possibility of an EGR CEL.

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Hi guys,

 

Lucky for me, it does say EJ22 on the block.  I was a bit worried about that sort of thing too, I didn't really get that warm fuzzy feeling from the seller.  So far so good though, no complaints yet.

 

I've got another question for you guys regarding tools.  I was studying the service manual, and noticed the need for some special tools (ST1 499597000 OIL SEAL GUIDE ST2 499587100 OIL SEAL INSTALLER).  Are these necessary to replace the camshaft and crankshaft oil seals?  I'm guessing no, but thought I would ask what you guys have used instead.  Reading through some other threads, looks like guys are using PVC or an appropriate sized socket to do the job.  Any new opinions there?  Looks like I'll need to get some tools for the cam and crank pulleys as well :mellow: .

 

I haven't tried too hard yet to find these tools, but the first couple sites I came across wanted around $250 for the pair.

 

Thanks guys, have a great day.

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To remove the cam and crank front seals, you can use anything that will hook the seal without scratching or gouging the surrounding metal surfaces.  I'm sure those who do this often have a favorite way.  However, one way is to drill a couple of small pilot holes into the seal, thread in screws a little way, and use the screws for something to pull on to get the seal out.  Installing these seals can be done with a socket, or even with no tools at all; you want to get them straight and flush with the front of the opening (not pushed all the way in), but unlike the rear main seal, these aren't so fussy about exact positioining (but they do need to be straight).

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i wouldn't buy any special tools for installing seals.

 

just find something that is flat and square and tap the seal into place.

the cam and crank seals are not very hard to do.

 

the large rear main seal is a b1tch.

it is a large diameter and it is very hard to keep it square to the shaft.

but i don't ever change them unless they are really leaking.

they usually do not leak.

so i don't change them.

 

the common leak on the rear of the block is the oil separator plate ,

not the rear main.

it is not unusual for a rear main seal to last the life of the car, 300k miles or more.

you can't say the same for the other seals.

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Looks like I'll need to get some tools for the cam and crank pulleys as well

 

No need for expensive special tools there either.

 

basically, you just need to keep the pulleys still while loosening the bolt - there are a variety of ways to do this.

 

The engine out of the car does make it a little more challenging, but not impossible.

 

using an impact gun before removing the timing belt can frequently be enough. if that doesnt work, you can use a piece of the old belt to cushion the pulleys and use a set of chain visegrips, or something, to hold the pulley...

 

where there is a will, there is a way - without spending more hard earned money. ;)

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I usually dig them out with a pick and or a flat screwdriver. I have had some nasty overcooked oil hardened seals that you almost have to chisel out. This  method may not be recommended in general, inless you are good enough to do it without scratching anything. I drive the seals in with a combination of axle sockets, and use deep sockets or socket extensions to sort of 'drift' the seals in place. I have once use an old throwout bearing to install the crank seal! (on an ea82)

 

If you watch this video, you can see what i am talking about. This video was made more for fun, but it is about building an engine and doing all the seals. The middle of the video is a fast forward of an ej22 re-seal from 5:45

 

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Thanks for the tips guys. I figured I probably didnt need the tools, but why not ask the experts while I'm here :).

 

I'll be getting started on this soon, getting all my parts and tools sorted out before I delve too deep.

 

As always, thanks!

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Awesome vid Miles!  I couldn't watch it on my phone, took a look when I got home.  I see what you were saying about drifting them in, looks easy enough.  Thanks for posting that, I liked the musical selection too!

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