Jump to content


Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, my lurker friend!

Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, an unparalleled Subaru community full of the greatest Subaru gurus and modders on the planet! We offer technical information and discussion about all things Subaru, the best and most popular all wheel drive vehicles ever created.

We offer all this information for free to everyone, even lurkers like you! All we ask in return is that you sign up and give back some of what you get out - without our awesome registered users none of this would be possible! Plus, you get way more great stuff as a member! Lurk to lose, participate to WIN*!
  • Say hello and join the conversation
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Classifieds with all sorts of Subaru goodies
  • Photo hosting in our gallery
  • Meet other cool people with cool cars
Seriously, what are you waiting for? Make your life more fulfilling and join today! You and your Subaru won't regret it, we guarantee** it.

* The joy of participation and being generally awesome constitutes winning
** Not an actual guarantee, but seriously, you probably won't regret it!

Serving the Subaru Community since May 18th, 1998!

Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

Rear diff & manual tran fluid change


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Arty

Arty

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 191 posts
  • Cincinnati Area

Posted 21 September 2010 - 07:49 PM

I'm wondering if there is anyone out there willing to give me the best directions on changing out differential fluid and manual transmission fluid on my '95 Legacy Outback? I honestly don't know of the last time either one of these has done, much less if they were even done by the previous owners.

Also- any ideas on the exact types and amounts of fluid I'll need?


Thanks!!!

#2 Olnick

Olnick

    Ol' Subaru Guy

  • Members
  • 2,581 posts
  • Honolulu HI

Posted 21 September 2010 - 09:35 PM

What the heck, I'll give it a try!

Before you start, figure out how you're going to add new gear oil. The front has to be refilled through dipstick tube--the rear diff through the top plug hole. (I made a rig with small plastic tubing siliconed to the snout of a small plastic bottle, cut off the bottom of the bottle and hang it up high so the fluid can slowly flow down.)

Drain the transaxle just like you change motor oil, just make sure it's the transaxle sump that you're draining!

Rear diff has two plugs, one over the other, that unscrew with a 1/2" drive (1/2" breaker bar fits perfectly.) Two warnings here:

1) Make sure you loosen the top plug first--to make sure you can add fresh oil after you drain the old out of the bottom hole!

2) The plugs are gonna' be tight! You'll probably need an extension pipe for leverage. If that doesn't work I've had good luck using the car's scissor jack to put pressure on the breaker bar (be very careful to apply the force perpendicular to the bar--if it slipped it would be very dangerous.)

My homemade filler tube worked well for the rear diff too--suspended the bottle by the rear wheel and snaked the tube through the wheel well to the top (fill) hole.

Fluids: A good quality gear oil--API GL-5 SAE 80W-90 front & rear.
(Although some of us swear by Red Line 75W-90ns for smooth shifting! Front end only, not in the rear diff.)

Quantities: 3.7 qts for the transaxle, 0.8 qts for the rear diff.

Good luck.

#3 Arty

Arty

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 191 posts
  • Cincinnati Area

Posted 21 September 2010 - 10:00 PM

What the heck, I'll give it a try!

Before you start, figure out how you're going to add new gear oil. The front has to be refilled through dipstick tube--the rear diff through the top plug hole. (I made a rig with small plastic tubing siliconed to the snout of a small plastic bottle, cut off the bottom of the bottle and hang it up high so the fluid can slowly flow down.)

Drain the transaxle just like you change motor oil, just make sure it's the transaxle sump that you're draining!

Rear diff has two plugs, one over the other, that unscrew with a 1/2" drive (1/2" breaker bar fits perfectly.) Two warnings here:

1) Make sure you loosen the top plug first--to make sure you can add fresh oil after you drain the old out of the bottom hole!

2) The plugs are gonna' be tight! You'll probably need an extension pipe for leverage. If that doesn't work I've had good luck using the car's scissor jack to put pressure on the breaker bar (be very careful to apply the force perpendicular to the bar--if it slipped it would be very dangerous.)

My homemade filler tube worked well for the rear diff too--suspended the bottle by the rear wheel and snaked the tube through the wheel well to the top (fill) hole.

Fluids: A good quality gear oil--API GL-5 SAE 80W-90 front & rear.
(Although some of us swear by Red Line 75W-90ns for smooth shifting! Front end only, not in the rear diff.)

Quantities: 3.7 qts for the transaxle, 0.8 qts for the rear diff.

Good luck.


Hey, that was perfect, thank you so much!

I've read a few things about Redline's fluid and most people seem to gravitate towards that... I'm actually quite conflicted about which fluid would be the best.

#4 edrach

edrach

    RIP 6/28/14

  • Members
  • 12,326 posts
  • Bothell, WA

Posted 22 September 2010 - 01:52 AM

Hey, that was perfect, thank you so much!

I've read a few things about Redline's fluid and most people seem to gravitate towards that... I'm actually quite conflicted about which fluid would be the best.

Check your owner's manual; I believe they specify 75W-90. I like the Redline (without the NS for lower mileage transmissions AND the rear diff). NS for high mileage transmissions; but stick with the non NS for the rear diff.

#5 forester2002s

forester2002s

    Subaru Fanatic!

  • Members
  • 502 posts
  • Vancouver Canada

Posted 26 September 2010 - 10:10 PM

Filling the rear diff is a bit tricky, because of the limited overhead clearance.

First, screw in the lower drain plug.

I use a 1 litre plastic bottle (1 US quart would work just as well). I use the type that has a tapered top, with a small nozzle in the cap (looks a bit like the top end of a caulking tube).

With this bottle full, or nearly full, of oil, I aim the 'nozzle' into the top filler plug-hole, and squeeze the bottle. I can only just about get the bottle to the horizontal, or slightly above horizontal.
After a few squeezes, I am blowing air; so the bottle needs to be refilled.
I keep filling the diff this way, until the oil starts to flow back out of the filler plug-hole.

That tells me that the oil level is correct. So then I screw in the top plug.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users