Jump to content


Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, my lurker friend!

Welcome to Ultimate Subaru Message Board, an unparalleled Subaru community full of the greatest Subaru gurus and modders on the planet! We offer technical information and discussion about all things Subaru, the best and most popular all wheel drive vehicles ever created.

We offer all this information for free to everyone, even lurkers like you! All we ask in return is that you sign up and give back some of what you get out - without our awesome registered users none of this would be possible! Plus, you get way more great stuff as a member! Lurk to lose, participate to WIN*!
  • Say hello and join the conversation
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Classifieds with all sorts of Subaru goodies
  • Photo hosting in our gallery
  • Meet other cool people with cool cars
Seriously, what are you waiting for? Make your life more fulfilling and join today! You and your Subaru won't regret it, we guarantee** it.

* The joy of participation and being generally awesome constitutes winning
** Not an actual guarantee, but seriously, you probably won't regret it!

Serving the Subaru Community since May 18th, 1998!

Guest Message by DevFuse
 

Photo
- - - - -

what all to replace- front end


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Sister7

Sister7

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 194 posts
  • Port Orchard

Posted 02 December 2012 - 11:58 AM

'93 legacy awd a/t, 144k.

I was going to do a quick axle change last night, but now it seems like I am going to need to replace the inner and outer tie rod ends on the driver's side. The outer because the bolt/stud part is freely rotating (happened after I got the nut off during disconnection vi BFH). The inner because the boot is trashed and it looks pretty gunky in there. So, now this is more of a project, I'm wondering what else I should replace while I'm in there...I don't have a lot of extra time right now, but I do have the cash for some more parts.

What would you replace? Tie rods on the other side? Ball joints? Wheel bearings (they seem okay)? Struts (susp is a little soft but not bad)? Any bushings I should consider?

I'm planning on keeping the car another 5 years/ 50k or so.

#2 porcupine73

porcupine73

    Obligate carnivore

  • Members
  • 4,920 posts
  • Buffalo, NY

Posted 02 December 2012 - 12:22 PM

Well I would definitely replace the steering gear boot, you don't want a lot of crud getting up into the rack. The tie rod ends I suppose if you think they are bad then replace. You really need the inner tie rod end tool to do it without dropping the rack though some people have come up with other tricks. You will of course need to adjust the front toe after replacing the tie rods.

Wheel bearing I wouldn't touch really unless you know its bad. Struts I mean if it is really bouncy then yes I'd say go for it. You can get enough clearance to extract the axle from the hub just from unhooking the bearing housing from the strut, though there's many ways and I guess you already got that part done by driving out the tie rod end.

#3 Fairtax4me

Fairtax4me

    Su bah roo'n

  • Gold Subscribers
  • 8,651 posts
  • Charlottesburg, VA

Posted 02 December 2012 - 12:23 PM

Struts can be done pretty much any time. Tie rods plan on doing an alignment after.
If you need the car in the meantime, use large pliers or vice grips to clamp the tie rod end down to the knuckle so you can tighten the nut.

#4 porcupine73

porcupine73

    Obligate carnivore

  • Members
  • 4,920 posts
  • Buffalo, NY

Posted 02 December 2012 - 12:32 PM

For toe after tie rod end work I've just been using the strings method, it seems to work fine with an accurate ruler. Then just dial the tie rods to get the toe you want. Often you can do that quicker than even waiting for it to be done at an alignment shop. Camber I do with a level against the wheel and calculate the arctan (I have it in Excel I could upload it), that will give you the +/- camber. It's probably not as accurate as the fancy laser alignment machines but that's how I've been doing it on all my soobs over the years without any issues that I've noticed.

#5 UMT

UMT

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 143 posts
  • Pound, WI.

Posted 03 December 2012 - 07:32 PM

For toe after tie rod end work I've just been using the strings method, it seems to work fine with an accurate ruler. Then just dial the tie rods to get the toe you want. Often you can do that quicker than even waiting for it to be done at an alignment shop. Camber I do with a level against the wheel and calculate the arctan (I have it in Excel I could upload it), that will give you the +/- camber. It's probably not as accurate as the fancy laser alignment machines but that's how I've been doing it on all my soobs over the years without any issues that I've noticed.


Please elaborate on the 'string method' for us who aren't familiar. Also curious about the 'arctan' process.

Thanks,
UMT

#6 porcupine73

porcupine73

    Obligate carnivore

  • Members
  • 4,920 posts
  • Buffalo, NY

Posted 03 December 2012 - 07:39 PM

I haven't searched it in a while but I think googling it shows a Porsche site where they show it being done. My boss told me he uses it on his track cars and that's pretty commonly done at tracks. You basically put a piece of string (I like thread since it's strong and thin) between two jackstands, then level them out on each side of the car. Get them the same distance from the front and rear. I usually use the end tips of the axles but that is not necessarily completely accurate. Then you measure from the leading and trailing edge of the wheels (not tires). You can calculate the degrees because its 60 minutes to a degree.

The arctan is taking the inverse tangent. Which ok now from high school trig how did that go, oscar had a heap of apples. So what was that sin cos tan I think. So tan was opposite over adjacent. So you know the distance between the leading and trailing edges, that is the hypotenuse. Then the adjacent becomes the small difference, like 1/8" that you measure. Since the toe is usually in inches you don't need arctan there. But it is perfect for doing the camber.

#7 UMT

UMT

    USMB is life!

  • Members
  • 143 posts
  • Pound, WI.

Posted 03 December 2012 - 08:09 PM

I haven't searched it in a while but I think googling it shows a Porsche site where they show it being done. My boss told me he uses it on his track cars and that's pretty commonly done at tracks. You basically put a piece of string (I like thread since it's strong and thin) between two jackstands, then level them out on each side of the car. Get them the same distance from the front and rear. I usually use the end tips of the axles but that is not necessarily completely accurate. Then you measure from the leading and trailing edge of the wheels (not tires). You can calculate the degrees because its 60 minutes to a degree.

The arctan is taking the inverse tangent. Which ok now from high school trig how did that go, oscar had a heap of apples. So what was that sin cos tan I think. So tan was opposite over adjacent. So you know the distance between the leading and trailing edges, that is the hypotenuse. Then the adjacent becomes the small difference, like 1/8" that you measure. Since the toe is usually in inches you don't need arctan there. But it is perfect for doing the camber.


High School Trig? Ha. I'm 58 years old!.... I was talking to an 'old boy' mechanic the other day and I asked him how they did it in the old days before the fancy machines and he old me that they would rotate and 'scribe' the tires (Usually a nail put into a vise) and then use a tape measure to make sure front and rear of tires were the same distance. (I had a friend/neighbor who was an engineer did the same) I asked him how they moved the tires while adjusting the tie rod ends and he said: 'just put a little sand under the tire. They'll move.' Camber??? I suppose its about the same but I realize that the tires need a certain 'degree' of camber....

Oh well, off to the shop I go! Ha....

UMT




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users