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Removal of rusted exhaust studs


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11 replies to this topic

#1 pearlm30

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 11:50 AM

I can't get one of the broken exhaust studs off. Can I use the HF portable torch to heat up area hot enough to remove it?Advice please.
Thanks

#2 Fairtax4me

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 01:12 AM

A propane torch might take a LONG time to get it good and hot but you can use it. Just keep the flame away from the plastic timing covers and other rubber parts.

Can you grab the end with vice grips? If so clamp them down as tight as you can and try tapping the handle with a hammer to help knock the stud loose. An overnight soak in PB or other rust penetrating oil will help as well.

#3 grossgary

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 08:04 AM

best way is to place a nut over top the existing stud and weld it onto the stud. then use a socket wrench to remove it. takes a few seconds.

propane helps sometimes, though i usually use it on nuts. get the flame right next to the surrounding area and the idea is to try to back the bolt out while it is still cool and the metal in the block is hot.

#4 ivans imports

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 09:47 AM

i drill them out to exact size of bolt not hole and retap the threds with bottoming tap just drill them will save many hous of greif buy a new cobalt bitt and make a dead center pilot hole with a small bitt first i fix about 50 broken exhuast bolts a week dam things

#5 grossgary

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 10:03 AM

i drill them

why don't you weld a nut on them and then back them out?

i haven't been able to find drill bits that easily and quickly drill through all the bolts on Subaru's, kind of annoying.

i got expensive online cobalt bits recommended by a machinist friend and they would not touch the torque converter to crankshaft bolts - brand new bits, oiled up, would not even make a dent in them. (not the flexplate bolts, those drill easily).

i had a thread about it here, had to grind them off
http://www.ultimates...ht=drill&page=3

i wish i could find a drill bit set that can drill through this stuff...

#6 ivans imports

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 10:13 AM

go get the ones for drilling stainless steel cost big $ but realy work or snapon drill bitt cheapies will not do i have a set of reverse bitts they work good i dont weld nuts to it because will harden steel and make it undrillabble i grind them flat with flange pin punch the center and drill through it this is only way i have had luck cause the alluiminum melts to bolt thread and bolt will never come out

#7 czny

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 10:58 AM

why don't you weld a nut on them and then back them out?

i haven't been able to find drill bits that easily and quickly drill through all the bolts on Subaru's, kind of annoying.

i got expensive online cobalt bits recommended by a machinist friend and they would not touch the torque converter to crankshaft bolts - brand new bits, oiled up, would not even make a dent in them. (not the flexplate bolts, those drill easily).

i had a thread about it here, had to grind them off
http://www.ultimates...ht=drill&page=3

i wish i could find a drill bit set that can drill through this stuff...


I've had success with heat hardened bolts & studs using carbide-tipped drill bits:
http://www.use-enco....016&PMAVID=1626
Having done field maintenance on bakery & pizza ovens where repeated 500+*F heat cycles hardened the hardware(pun intended) it became necessary to resort to these. Straight flute carbide tipped die drills work too.You need to keep the bit from chattering otherwise they'll shatter. Low RPM & lots of pressure.

#8 pearlm30

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 11:03 AM

Thanks for all the suggestions. I am wondering if the welder that's on sale for $100 on HF tools will be able to weld???
The rust really drive me crazy

Edited by pearlm30, 10 August 2012 - 11:05 AM.


#9 grossgary

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 12:36 PM

Thanks for all the suggestions. I am wondering if the welder that's on sale for $100 on HF tools will be able to weld???

i use a cheap Lowe's wire feed welder and it works fine for simple stuff, i've removed quite a few rusty stuff with it. there are of course cases where it won't work or you want want too. like i had a stuck pinch bolt but didn't want to weld around the wheel bearing due to heat, or you won't have access to it with a welder, or it shears off flush with or deep into a hole....etc, so welding doesn't always work, but sometimes it's a quick and easy solution.

i'm not sure if it's true but i suspect the process of welding/heating it up also helps as i've had them come out surprisingly easy before after welding. some very tight turning of the wrench sheared it off but the welded on nut easily came out...i just assume that's heat cycle related but no idea.

#10 ShawnW

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 03:42 AM

This is my favorite tool in the toolbox lately. Finally broke it after 5 years of professional use. As long as you don't ratchet it-it will last. I use a 3/8 breaker bar instead of a ratchet.

http://asttool.com/d...x&keywords=stud

#11 grossgary

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 05:28 AM

This is my favorite tool in the toolbox lately. Finally broke it after 5 years of professional use. As long as you don't ratchet it-it will last. I use a 3/8 breaker bar instead of a ratchet.

http://asttool.com/d...x&keywords=stud

would this tool hold up to east coast nastiness? wonder if 5 years of use there means 2 months here. LOL

#12 ShawnW

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 02:41 AM

I have a feeling it would do pretty well.




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