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Hello and Thanks !



My 01 Forester has a fairly loud klunk in suspension. It happens
when stepping on brake pedal, and when going over bumps in road (not
braking).



I heard what I thought sounded like something slamming, it sounded (I
think) close to firewall, as if  (oh no) a rear engine mount was bad,
but I'm not even sure it has a rear mount, However cannot be sure where
that slam really is coming from. The slam is simultaneous with the
klunk, maybe even is the same thing, not a separate sound





* Even with light pedal pressure.

* It also klunks when brake pedal is released, but not quite as loud and forceful.

* Steering wheel does not pull or jolt when it happens.

* Has new struts.

* If stomp hard on brake pedal, klunk becomes louder, like slam.



Also when (not braking) tires hit the road at bottom of a driveway
ramp where road surface angle changes abruptly, or when tires hit the
start of the same driveway ramp (going up).



Any & all help is appreciated !

Edited by outbackred

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The bearing at the top of the strut can clunk, if the noise seems to be coming from high-up and just in front of the windshield.

 

Noises can sometimes be ferreted out by applying the brakes, leaving them on, and attempting to drive forwards then backwards a few times.

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Thanks CNY Dave !

 

Yes, ...high-up and just in front of the windshield....that's  where I thought it sounded so  close to firewall

 

Appreciated !

Edited by outbackred

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any advance on this? maybe the pitch stopper has a bad bushing?

 

 

Thanks !  I really appreciate yer asking.   No advance yet...too darn busy. Been driving the Impreza. 

 

Never heard of pitch stopper. Searched it and it seems all search results (on first page) are Subaru, as if only Subaru has pitch stopper. Saw some threads about it too.

 

Anyway I will for sure check pitch stopper,  and the other good suggestions from kind members on this forum.

 

Possibilities from members so far include:

Pitch stopper,  ball joint,  rear bushing on lower control arm,  bearing at the top of the strut..

 

 

 

Side Note:

Someone gave me a 95 Legacy 2.2  (120K miles)  which I had looked at in August. He was selling it for his ex-girlfriend.  She left town. Two months later he calls me.  New girlfriend.  Needs parking space.  How could I say no? Now I  must sell a Subie  or two.  Fleet reduction program.

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yeah, they sometimes call it the dogbone. supposed to direct the engine down (or body up?) in a severe front impact.

 

The bigger job it does is keep the engine/trans from bucking upward under throttle.  they ussually just break or bend in impacts.

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Update:

 

Well, I got a mechanic to put the 01 Forester on a lift.

 

He showed me two Klunky things:

1) Control arm bushings are worn pretty bad.

2) ...and Tie rods need replacing. Torn boot, wiggly wheels.

 

Honolulu prices: $550 for bushings. And then $450 for tie rods and alignment.

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bad rear bushing on lower control arm could be quite loud.

 

She is a loose one, and she is loud... I'm thinking you may have identified the culprit. Thanks !

Edited by outbackred
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1 Lucky Texan said:

 

"bad rear bushing on lower control arm could be quite loud.

 

 

BINGO !!

 

You got it! Tight and quiet now.

 

Also, Tie Rods will be replaced a little later.

 

Thanks again !

Edited by outbackred
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