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stevetone

Lateral Link Bolt Cut Off, Knuckle Damaged, Doh!

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Well, after wrestling with the lateral link bolt, aka "BAB," for 2 days, i went to Plan B--the reciprocating saw.

 

All went well, taking only 15 minutes to make 2 cuts into the Grade 8 bolt. I had expected a much harder time of it, as I used some cheap blades I had laying around. *Only* went through 4 of them!

 

Anyway, after feeling really good about that, I looked at the knuckle and noticed that I carved into it 1/16 - 1/8" or so. Photo attached.

 

So my question is: If I grind that smooth, can I reuse the knuckle? Or am I just asking for trouble in alignment?

 

So far, this *wheel bearing job* is more about battling rust than the actual bearing. I haven't even got to that part yet...

 

 

steve

2003 Forester X

post-5858-0-43682900-1370550547_thumb.jpg

Edited by stevetone

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I used to just buya whole used "stub" - easier to install, no messing at all with that bolt.

 

That's what I'd likely still do - check your local JY's.

 

When I was doing 95-99's they's deliver one for 100 bucks.  Not near the frustration.

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That shouldn't affect alignment, but if you want to feel more comfortable about it that should be easy to grind smooth with an angle grinder. Careful though, aluminum can deform easily if it gets too hot while grinding.

 

RX, this particular bolt is known to be a son-of-a-beech even on cars that aren't rusty. It's about 10" long and the center section (about 4") is exposed to dirt and road grime, which quickly causes corrosion of the aluminum knuckle.

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I can't really help you with the issue, but that much rust on a 2003 model? That's bad!!

 

It was a Chicago rental car in its previous life. They use a little salt on the roads there in the winter...You should see the outside of the brake drum!

 

(Of course, Wisconsin, where I live, is not any better.)

 

 

That shouldn't affect alignment, but if you want to feel more comfortable about it that should be easy to grind smooth with an angle grinder. Careful though, aluminum can deform easily if it gets too hot while grinding.

 

RX, this particular bolt is known to be a son-of-a-beech even on cars that aren't rusty. It's about 10" long and the center section (about 4") is exposed to dirt and road grime, which quickly causes corrosion of the aluminum knuckle.

 

So smoothing it out a bit will not reduce the width enough to cause a problem? The other side I did a better job, so no touch-up would be needed there.

 

Thanks everyone for your help! Hope to get to the actual project, replacing the bearing, sometime soon  :mellow:

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I used to just buya whole used "stub" - easier to install, no messing at all with that bolt.

 

That's what I'd likely still do - check your local JY's.

 

When I was doing 95-99's they's deliver one for 100 bucks.  Not near the frustration.

 

That sounds like a good approach. You are much wiser than me...

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That sounds like a good approach. You are much wiser than me...

Hey - it's already off to take to an old fashioned press that way also if you wish to swap the bearing.  I'd jsut try to go by feel ont eh new "stub" and only one time bothered having a new bearing installed (I have no press or fancy hub tamer, etc.).

 

Infact I started doing thie instead of doing the bearings.  ANd I beleive I got the idea here actually.  Not an original idea.

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I've had to do the me thing. Unfortunately, some of them don't like to move, even with a press and a torch. I found out the hard way when the knuckle broke before the bolt moved....

 

If you grind that ear flat, you should have no issues with the alignment.

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Just make sure the nut threads on far enough to actually 'pinch' everything together tightly.

 

If not, stack washer as needed under the nut. Or maybe even put one the thickness of what you cut away at the point where it was cut.

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Thank you everyone for your help. I will grind smooth and continue.

 

BTW, a Pitman Puller did a nice job on getting the bushings out of the control arms. I had rigged up a pipe and bolt solution on the first bushing, but ended up snapping the bolt. The Pitman was much easier.

 

steve

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Email me if you want my step-by-step guide on how to replace your rear wheel bearing with the Hub Shark (HF style) tool kit.


The lateral link bolt is the potential show-stopper.  But I have a solution for that puppy.


nwlovell at yahoo.

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In wisconsin you have tp pre-emptively take everything apart while it is somewhat new, so that you can get it apart when service is due.

 

I worked at the uhaul on atlas ct installing hitches and you would be amazed at how much rust there would be on a 5 year old car. 

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Had a 01 outback yesterday that when i hoisted it the rear diff hanger / suspention broke and fell down the frame x member rusted thru i had to tell them was unsafe have never seen thiss before and was broken in a way was very dangerus and could have been catastofic if broke at hyway speeds good thing it broke on hoist. The ps rear wheel had nothing holding it to car other than rear shock and the customer had no idea complant of pulling to ps side

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The 00-09(?) rear subframes are developing a reputation for being rusty as H-E-double-hockey-sticks.

Seems to me there was a thread that mentioned a TSB for it. Not sure if there was a recall.

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yep,  ANTI-SEIZE EVERYTHING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

i've had anti seized parts still be seized in under a year, that stuff isnt' all that great.  better than nothing i'm sure but i've had ball joints still seized in the knuckle in short order.  at some point i wanted to start another thread about that and see what folks are doing to prevent seized bolts/ball joints, slides, etc.  and see if anyone else has had antiseize not really fair that well all the time.  it does good and all but i've had a few times where it seemed lacking.

 

Had a 01 outback yesterday that when i hoisted it the rear diff hanger / suspention broke and fell down the frame x member rusted thru i had to tell them was unsafe have never seen thiss before and was broken in a way was very dangerus and could have been catastofic if broke at hyway speeds good thing it broke on hoist. The ps rear wheel had nothing holding it to car other than rear shock and the customer had no idea complant of pulling to ps side

 

those early 00-04's had rear subframe rust issues with a recall of some sort - Subaru has paid for the replacement before...a couple of folks have had those paid for/repaired in just the last year or two, might want to call Subaru.

Edited by grossgary

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What a bugger to change it took me a whole day many seized bolts and came out in 4 peices is somthing to watch for. Its hollow so the salt and dirt gets traped inside it I call boooo on that part was better off with the struts in the back

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What a bugger to change it took me a whole day many seized bolts and came out in 4 peices is somthing to watch for. Its hollow so the salt and dirt gets traped inside it I call boooo on that part was better off with the struts in the back

did you have to drill out a bunch of bolts - i've always wondered how it's even replaceable - rust is so bad around here i can't imagine what i'd do with every bolt shearing off.

 

did you check with Subaru on recall/replacement part?  they can search the VIN but you know all that..

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That shouldn't affect alignment, but if you want to feel more comfortable about it that should be easy to grind smooth with an angle grinder. Careful though, aluminum can deform easily if it gets too hot while grinding.

 

RX, this particular bolt is known to be a son-of-a-beech even on cars that aren't rusty. It's about 10" long and the center section (about 4") is exposed to dirt and road grime, which quickly causes corrosion of the aluminum knuckle.

 

Knuckle isn't aluminum.

 

If it was aluminum, it wouldn't be covered in red rust.

 

I wouldn't reinstall that knuckle.....get another

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