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Hi guys, I'm about to replace my '99 impreza with a brand new one. One of my biggest pet peeves is rust. (Especially in new england). The first thing that I always see rusting is the exhaust, even after a few thousand miles.

 

Does anybody know of a good paint to coat the exhaust with that will prevent any corrosion? Or are their any other methods of preventing exhaust rust?

 

The main reason I've had to replace my old impreza is because of rust, which is why I'm really focused on eliminating it. I want to squeeze as much life as possible out of this new one that I'm about to get. As far as everything else on the car, I will be undercoating it with par-al-ketone and a couple of other chemicals that I use on our aircraft at work.

 

If anybodies wondering, here are some of the other chemicals: corrosion x (get the aviation standard because it's better), mastinox, boeshield t-9, and cor-ban.

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Look into VHT paints. Sprayed some today.

 

Doug

+1 on the VHT high temp. Surface prep counts too. Also, try to clean off road salts ASAP. Think about it this way. Every time a boat comes in from a salt water run you wash it off with a fresh water hose to keep it nice. Cars rarely get this type of treatment but it does help.

Edited by Crazyeights

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I have a Jeep jk and I know a few people that use the high temperature bbq paint on on the exhaust. I have never tried it.

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Hi guys, I'm about to replace my '99 impreza with a brand new one. One of my biggest pet peeves is rust. (Especially in new england). The first thing that I always see rusting is the exhaust, even after a few thousand miles..

a west coast forum member shipped me a spotless rust free exhaust and i installed it in February in my 2002 OBW.  it's already showing rust.  i was wanting to ask the same question before winter got here as i'll probably drop it and try to treat it somehow and get an extra month out of it. LOL

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I have experience with VHT spray paint on a 2009 Toyota. I put on 2 light coats of VHT primer first, then another 2 light coats of VHT flat aluminum paint. Followed by a curing process by driving the car according to the instrucdtions on the bottle. VHT is rated 1300 - 2000 degrees F. It's best to use it when the humidity is < 60%. Ambient temp is between 60 and 95 F. I did my Toyota within a week after purchasing the car new in 2008. I used a wire brush and wire wheel attached to a drill to remove some rust, especially on the flanges. New cars' exhausts have rust also. It's been 5 years and there is very little rust on the exhaust. The only area rust developed during these 5 years is near the muffler where the pipe has a curvature. I cleaned it out last month and put on VHT again. Don't know how well it works on older cars with plenty of rust already. You can get VHT from Advanced Auto or Amazon.com. It's about $10 a bottle.

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I've heard VHT is good stuff, never tried it myself. I like the stainless steel approach, which is to replace the whole exhaust system with stainless steel parts, but that can cost over $1,000.

There are some paints that have zinc in them which will act as sacrificial anode in salty areas and prevent galvanic corrosion of the steel parts. I'm unsure if any of these are suited for use on exhaust parts though.

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Hmm, I was under some delusion that the OE exhaust was stainless, or something similarly corrosion resistant. Guess that doesn't make sense thinking about it.

 

I've used VHT caliper paint (900 deg, I think) on brake rotors (keep the hats/backs from rusting), and am happy with it. Although the paint is now covered in brake dust (but no rust!).

 

I'm planning on using some leftover wood stove paint (Thermolux - 1200 degF) on part of an exhaust I picked up from NC that I'm cleaning up. We'll see how well that works.

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From what everybody is saying, it sounds like VHT is the stuff to go with. I'll definitely be purchasing a few bottles as soon as I pick up the car. Thanks guys!

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I have experience with VHT spray paint on a 2009 Toyota. I put on 2 light coats of VHT primer first, then another 2 light coats of VHT flat aluminum paint. .

 

do you recall how many cans it took for one exhaust? 

 

Hmm, I was under some delusion that the OE exhaust was stainless, or something similarly corrosion resistant. Guess that doesn't make sense thinking about it.

you are not delusional...well not about Subaru exhaust, it's not stainless stel but it is corrosion resistant.  galvanized annodized or something.  it doesn't rust out as fast as cheaper exhausts.

 

hopefully i'll be trying a can of the stuff before winter.

Edited by grossgary

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Don't remember how many cans I used. Probably 2 cans primer plus 2 cans paint on my 09 Camry I4 with single exhaust. I also painted the muffler. I still have a little left. If you don't use primer you only need half as many. But you'll get longer-lasting result with primer. I also did my 2004 Camry (earlier post was for 2009 Camry) with VHT back in 2004 when the car was new. I didn't use primer on the 04post-19332-0-50456700-1375020099_thumb.jpgpost-19332-0-20896300-1375020088_thumb.jpgpost-19332-0-91352100-1375020075_thumb.jpg and more rust developed than my 2009. I don't know how much the primer helps on an older car with rust already. The instruction on the can says a bottle covers 12-14 square feet.

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You guys just need to petition your local governments to stop using such caustic chemicals on the roads,that or move.It makes no sense to use some sort of snow remover that eats cars in only a couple of years.How bad can snow really be?We use gravel on our roads and rust is a rare thing that only happens to very old cars.

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You guys just need to petition your local governments to stop using such caustic chemicals on the roads,that or move.It makes no sense to use some sort of snow remover that eats cars in only a couple of years.How bad can snow really be?We use gravel on our roads and rust is a rare thing that only happens to very old cars.

 

You know what's even better about salting roads? Here in Nova Scotia we dump an average of 280,000 tonnes of salt on our roads every winter and I've read that on average each tonne of salt used costs our province something like $900 in infrastructure damage and reduced life... So they get a huge bargain by buying salt at $65/tonne instead of some of the more advanced and less harmful alternatives that cost a bit more but would save massive amounts of ruination in the long run. Brilliant! 

 

Hate salt... so much...

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no idea what it is to gravel/sand the roads but it isn't nearly as bad as the salt.Other than a few cracked windshields.Windows are much easier to replace compared to rust damage.Although my 82 subaru has a little bit of rust.The bottoms of the doors have some rust showing and the bottom edge of the side windows the paint is bubbling. then again the is 31 years old, and its been offroad at least two of those years(it started life as a FWD so it was nice and clean :) )

 

 

Nix that,Just found out idaho switched to mag cloride and regular salt. EPIC SAD FACE. 

Edited by Uberoo

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okay, thanks.

 

the entire DC, Baltimore, Philly, NJ, New York, Connecticut is a multi-state metropolitan corridor with massive suburbs and commuter communities that cover the entire northeast. the population density is high and remaining mobile in snow is vastly different here than other areas.  8 states/DC from the Northeast are listed in top 10 for population densities in the US, all before California even at 10.  it's not like any other area of the country.  what works elsewhere may not be a good fit there.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_by_population_density

 

 

Nix that,Just found out idaho switched to mag cloride and regular salt. EPIC SAD FACE. 

really, they changed?  did it say why?  i've always wondered why it's so different.

noh no - you'l now petition the gov and move out of state!?

Edited by grossgary

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