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cmiller

EA82 to EA82T ????

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Does anyone have a good write up of putting a turbo from a '87 GL-10 into a Loyale? They both have EA82 engines so it would seem like it would work. I found a good condition GL-10 at B&R today and was just wondering.... Any comments or input would help. Thanks!

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the EA82 and EA82T have different compression ratio pistons. best to use the EA82T pistons for a turbo application. you can use the NA block but the turbo block will give you more power and be be more reliable.

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the EA82 and EA82T have different compression ratio pistons. best to use the EA82T pistons for a turbo application. you can use the NA block but the turbo block will give you more power and be be more reliable.

 

The turbo block will NOT give you more power. What it will do is allow for higher boost with lower chances of detonation.

 

I like my N/A EA82T:D

 

Back on topic.. The actual motor itself is the easy part. You also need the exhaust, xmember, wiring harness, ECU and other assorted things like MAF and such. Best to get the whole car for donor parts.

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i was under the impression that the lower compression pistons are easier to get more power from. not necessarily that the pistons add power, but that they do allow for more power with the right setup?

 

either way, believe calebz more than me i'm still learning the turbo stuff.

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the main thing you need to remember is,you cant just slap a turbo on a non-turbo motor and expect it to work for very long,everything on a turboed car is made stronger to withstand the additional torque,things like the axels,tranny,the crank,these things are made stronger on a turboed car,people just think,i;ll slap a turbo on it,and be fast,it doesnt work that way.a perfect example a 18 yearold kid that lives around here has a nice eagle talon,well he said the same thing i'll turbo it,a week into geetin on it,he tears the crank out,the only problem was eagle didnt make a turboed crank for his car,when all was said and he has spent $5k getting a custom built cam and getting it running,what makes this kid even dumber is he wouldnt believe everybody when they told him why this happened,so he just had the crank replaced,cant wait till it blows up again.

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Thats not so much of an issue with ea82 cars.

 

I'm using an NA shortblock with turbo heads and a TD04 from a WRX.. no explosions yet:D

 

 

I've also done the NA to turbo conversion on a volvo 740.. I can honestly say the NA volvo motor really LIKES the turbo..lol

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ac= (( 1 + [ x / 14.7 ] ) ^ 0.5 ) * SC

 

x = psi of boost

SC = static compression (ie: without the turbo, what is the compression of the pistons?)

ac = actual compression at given psi

 

so, with that, if you know your built subie motor runs just fine at 12:1 pistons with no detonation issues running pump gas (be it 92 or 93 or whathaveyou) then you know that's a ballpark figure for the max compression you can have after boost too...

 

so, with 7.7:1 pistons you would need 21psi of boost to reach a compression ratio of about 12:1 at max boost. With 8.7:1 pistons you're looking at only 13.2psi of boost. Why does it seem like the n/a pistons give you more power? more bottom end. it's harder to get a 7.7:1 motor to spool a turbo that can flow 21 psi. but if you got it right, it would have a higher crank hp than the other motor at 13.2psi. (but a longer wait) that's why some people go with superchargers and blowers, is because there is no spool time. but not to forget, I don't know if any subaru internals in the EA82 motors could withstand 21psi for very long. :P

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