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DIY Struts R&R?


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13 replies to this topic

#1 blitz

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 09:40 AM

Anyone changed out their struts on their Impreza themselves?

I did it years ago on my old Dodge Colt using a generic automotive spring compressor tool that I rented, but I remember it being a precarious operation on account of the tendency of the compressed spring to want to pop (lethaly) out of the tool. Maybe there's a better tool that I'm not aware of I dunno. :confused:

Any knowledgable advice is appreciated. TIA

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#2 Strakes

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 11:46 AM

ask Andyjo and take a look at his writeup:

http://www.ultimates...ead.php?t=50268

Oh, I've replaced struts on various cars and after one precarious incident when the tool slid to one side and made the spring bow out like a slinky made me rethink what kind of compressor I would use in the future. Thank God I didn't end up with a lobotomy. There are many available, but the one I like have hooks with a lockable pin to hold it in place. Like this:

Posted Image

hope that helps and good luck!

#3 blitz

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 02:11 PM

Thanks Strakes! :headbang:

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#4 JPX

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 04:00 PM

I did it years ago on my old Dodge Colt using a generic automotive spring compressor tool that I rented, but I remember it being a precarious operation on account of the tendency of the compressed spring to want to pop (lethaly) out of the tool. Maybe there's a better tool that I'm not aware of I dunno. :confused:


Here is a completely unsafe way of doing it during my 96 Legacy's rear strut replacement. My friend in the picture insisted on doing it this way instead of waiting until morning to get a "proper" spring compressor - and his idea of proper is from Harbor Freight.:-\

Posted Image

DON"T DO IT THIS WAY!

#5 edrach

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 05:07 PM

Here is a completely unsafe way of doing it during my 96 Legacy's rear strut replacement. My friend in the picture insisted on doing it this way instead of waiting until morning to get a "proper" spring compressor - and his idea of proper is from Harbor Freight.:-\

Posted Image

DON"T DO IT THIS WAY!

Odd, your Harbor Freight link takes me to the website of the Ministry of Commerce of the the People's Republic of China.

#6 nipper

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 05:15 PM

Odd, your Harbor Freight link takes me to the website of the Ministry of Commerce of the the People's Republic of China.

how is that odd ..... thats where harbor freight stuff comes from anyway :)

nipper

#7 tcspeer

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 10:18 PM

China Mart gets their stuff there also.

how is that odd ..... thats where harbor freight stuff comes from anyway :)

nipper



#8 kevinC

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 10:21 PM

I used some short lengths of chain and some all thread. I had the problem of the spring compression tools being to bulky to fit properly.

#9 tcspeer

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 10:45 PM

That seems like it would be a good idea as you could put the chain on the inside for safety. (couldn't you?)

I used some short lengths of chain and some all thread. I had the problem of the spring compression tools being to bulky to fit properly.



#10 JPX

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 07:49 PM

Odd, your Harbor Freight link takes me to the website of the Ministry of Commerce of the the People's Republic of China.


how is that odd ..... thats where harbor freight stuff comes from anyway :)
nipper


Exactly my point!:headbang:

#11 a97obw

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 08:56 PM

The tool shown in the picture above can be "borrowed" from your local autozone, and if you are replacing the front struts on a Legacy Outback the tool is aaaaaaaaallllllllllmosssssstttttt long enough to do the job. Trust me---have a friend handy to start the nut on the top of the strut assembly while all 246 lbs. of you are leaning over it with your feet in the air.:cool:

#12 SuBrat84

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 09:11 PM

I just did some rears on a Forester.. I have compressors similar to the ones pictured.. but two teeth on one end and just one tooth on the other end. They were just fine. It was pretty easy and only took me about 2.5 hours (pulling up to his house, and then leaving his house) A couple of those nuts that are torqued over 100lbs are a little tough to break..

#13 Andyjo

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 09:19 PM

guys.. you can rent that compressor from advanced auto, or autozone.. .same one pictured for like 50 buck or soemthing... and if you bring it back.. they give you 100% back... dont' risk killing yourself with freaking string.. lol...
yeah.. those bolts are fun arn't they? when i lifted my roo' i ended up laying on the ground, feet up in the wheel well pulling on my breaker bar... get it on the 3rd try :rolleyes:
a neat trick i learned this weekend can really help with those too.
you take you breaker bar.. and like.. sit on it.. or put alot of force on it... then have someone else hit it about 1/2 way up the shaft.. it's just like having an impact gun.. but less the air comrpessor.. works great ;) the key is to keep the constant pressure.. and then hit it.. not just hit it ;)

#14 SuBrat84

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 12:58 AM

you take you breaker bar.. and like.. sit on it.. or put alot of force on it... then have someone else hit it about 1/2 way up the shaft.. it's just like having an impact gun.. but less the air comrpessor.. works great ;) the key is to keep the constant pressure.. and then hit it.. not just hit it ;)


Yeah, I've used that to break some tough axle nuts before. The problem I found in the forester was that the lower knuckle bolt was kind of awkward to get a wrench on.. It's all about getting the right angles and then just applying a ton of pressure!:headbang:




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