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LUVMYBRAT

lift questions?

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I have made a set of blocks for my brat much like those on Hasseys', Subarubrats and others I'm sure. My question is this those type use connectors between the blocks for rigidity and support, and the back usually has a tie bar going across from side to side, Are the connectors and side to side braces necessary? My blocks are 1/4" tubing so I know their strong enough, I want to get the brat in the air but I dont have the time to build all the connectors and braces, I know BYB's and others use solid blocks with no connectors, so is my worry about strenth and saftey really an issue? Also if I use EA82 rear coilovers the ride is said to be stiffer, will this improve the load capacity with out bottoming out? I want to add some good weight in the rear come winter to keep the wheels on the ground in the high wind during my commute.

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They are vital for safety and integrity of the lift. I would not set foot in a BRAT that had been lifted without the connecting struts (in the 5in plus size). Without them you would have all sorts of problems, all of them bad.

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That is a bit different. I would suggest linking the front two blocks at the crossmember or using one longer one. But at 3 inches, you are fine without the connecting struts.

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My front block is a single block for both front mount holes, what about the coilover issue, thoughts. and this may be a stupid question, with a 3" lift does the steering column get 3"s also, its at an angle so I didn't know if it needed more or less or the same. :confused:

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Now you see why I bought my kit, alot less hassle. Of course if people didnt experiment with their own design, innovation wouldnt exist.

 

I'm sure with some geometry you could calculate how long the steering shaft needs to be. Use the shaft as the hypotenuse of the triangle, you then make one of the legs 3 inches longer, so the hypotenuse will change, but not by the same amount.

 

At 3 inches I dont see the need for connecting the lifting blocks. On the PK kit the rear mustache bar uses one big block for the 2 bolts to go through on each side. Ditto on the front cross member. A 3rd bolt is also introduced. For added strength I assume. I dont even want to try to figure out how to fab up the strut tops... I'm glad they came prewelded and marked for each side.

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what are your guys thoughts about that coil over question? I plan on using EA82 rear coilovers at the rear with 3" blocks, I remember an interesting thread saying that would be a 6" lift, they must have been :drunk: when they measured that. but anyways one person said that the combo works just makes for stiff ride. well does the combo increase load capability also? Like I said I have to pull a pretty good mountain pass in the winter and I want load up the sand bags and other road hazard items for the Brat to keep a steady foot on the ground. What I dont want is a bottomed out suspension.

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I have a brat that needs new shocks and I've been exploring the same thing. So far, I think that adding EA82 coilovers to a brat (which is going to be extremely lightweight in the rear anyway) might be overkill. if you try and haul too much, you could risk damaging the frame.

 

 

I'm curious about removing the torsion bars and then installing the EA82 coilovers in the back of a brat. what might be flawed about that idea? anyone?

that would give less push to the rear end and in effect it would feel like a stock EA82 setup... since the torsion bars AND coilovers are why it sits up so high and stiff if you swap the coilovers onto an EA81 car.

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the brat is a solid unibody. there shouldn't be any issue with overloading it, the light rearend is exactly why I want to add some weight for sure footed travel in the winter winds. Croosing the summit in Wyoming in the dead of winter can be nasty. I just want to know if it can handle the weight better with the coilovers on there. I'm only talkin a couple hundred pounds, not a whole lot.

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yes, it will handle weight a lot better. I put rear coilovers in a unlifted brat. they lifted it up about 2" and it didn't sag with a load either. my torsion bar was broken is why I did mine and there wasn't enough metal to attempt to take the old one out and hope the captive nuts would still be there :)

 

depending on how you make your mounts though, you may not need a 3" lift with the coil-overs.

 

I have my torsion bar adjusted in my 82, and it's a ton stiffer in the rear too...

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wow, ok I'm bringin back an old thread since I'm going to be using the EA82 rear coilovers in the back of the same Brat that LUVMYBRAT has been talking about in this thread. So if I crank the torsion bars down in the rear and install the EA82 rear coilovers, will it still sit at stock height? Will they even bolt into an unlifted Brat? I'm thinkin they will since McBrat has already said he put some in an unlifted Brat but how did it make it handle and what did you have to do to the stock torsion bars?

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i think i remember something about them being a pretty stiff ride.even with the torsion not even clocked.

 

would be better then the butt end of it bouncing all over the road like its a mexican jumping bean! You have to remember I know what a stiff ride is like in a Brat... I had the one with no suspension at all!:brow:

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