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So im getting ready to start the tear down on my 94 ea82 any tips tricks or advice on doing this other than of course documenting and label things.

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yes... read, read, and then read some more.

If you are methodical and label things and write down the sequence you removed parts... then it just goes back together in the reverse order.

Is the engine pulled yet?

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I just rebuilt an EA82 a few months ago and I took a fair amount of pics. I'm not ready to do a write up on it, but I'll be happy to help with specifics if you need some pointers. As long as it's NOT an EA82T it will probably run forever when you are done. It will also ALWAYS be underpowered, even after it's been rebuilt ;)

Edited by Crazyeights

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Yeah its pulled and on my hoist not exactly positive how to mount it on my stand its a conventional stand and the ea82 is far from a conventional engine haha would I just put the studs through the bottom arms on the mount with some grade eight bolts through the top?

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..and its not an ea82t and I know it's underpowered my friend has an 85 brat and my secondary car is an 85 Toyota tercel wagon 4x4 with a massive 65hp so im well aware

Edited by risonm92

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I mounted mine to a Harbor Freight motor stand.   I remember the studs were just barely long enough to fit thru the mounting plate. 

When messing with the flywheel/pressure plate, just set the motor on an old tire.  Hopefully on top a sturdy table.  Or remove them while it's still hanging from the chain.

It is easier to mount the plate to the motor first.  I used all 4 mount points.  Then, just pick up the motor (2 people) and slide the cylindrical tube (part of the mount plate) back into the motor stand.

Good Luck.  Although you won't need it.   Just read up a bunch and ask specific questions.   Use the Felpro 9293PT head gaskets.  PT stands for permatorque.

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How common is it for these engines to lose compression for reasons other than a blown head gasket? If I don't HAVE to I'd rather not pull the whole thing apart just curious.

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Did you check the compression before you pulled the motor?  What are those values?   Wet and Dry readings?

I have only resealed two EA82's.  Both because of failed HG's.    I have not split the case yet.   You only need to split the case if you are doing crank bearings, rod bearings or piston rings.

My next EA82 pull on the wagon I've had for 20 years... will be a total engine rebuild.   Why?   Because I want to.    I know I could probably just do a reseal (to address the oil leaks), but I love breaking down and rebuilding motors.  Besides that... it has to last me another 20 years.

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The compression figures that you typed in your other thread (0-35psi on 3cyls, IIRC) are unlikely to be due to block/lower-end issues... unless there is a hole in your pistons.  Probably valves hanging open or rockers fallen loose.  Pull the heads and have a look-see. 

 

(edit: fixed typo: "hole" vs "whole".  Stupid fingers...)

Edited by NorthWet

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As northwet said my readings on 3/4 cylinders was 35 or less and only 1/4 was about 170. Anyways ice got it down to just the block and heads and timing belt covers im fighting with the covers because every single bolt holding them on is rusty beyond belief.

Edited by risonm92

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break them off, throw them away, you dont need em. i carry an extra set of belts, a 12mm deepsocket, and a 22mm. ive changed a timing belt on the freeway in 20 minutes. cheers

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break them off, throw them away, you dont need em. i carry an extra set of belts, a 12mm deepsocket, and a 22mm. ive changed a timing belt on the freeway in 20 minutes. cheers

haha that's awesome but knowing me and my luck I wouldn't be as fortunate as you to just be able to throw timing belts on like that. After work today im gonna drill the remaining ones out.

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check height of hla bore sleaves they like to lift out of heads and hangup lifters should all be same height and about 0.50 mm above head surface also check bore for scratches on topside of pistons. and look for carbon at bottom of valve stem were it gos up into the giude like to carbon at bootom and somtimes will not let valve close all the way at same time look for droped guides should all be same height

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check height of hla bore sleaves they like to lift out of heads and hangup lifters should all be same height and about 0.50 mm above head surface also check bore for scratches on topside of pistons. and look for carbon at bottom of valve stem were it gos up into the giude like to carbon at bootom and somtimes will not let valve close all the way at same time look for droped guides should all be same height

All excellent tips and right on the money. Thanks as always Ivan!

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Also on a somewhat side note can anyone tell me whether or not an ea81 alternator bracket would mount on an ea82 my compressor is shot and I don't feel like replacing it seeing how I seldomly use ac anywho. Just curious I'll have to address that sooner or later as well.

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When I removed the A/C from my '85 EA82, I used the same bracket (the one that bolted into the top of the compressor).   I just measured and cut a 1/2" Galv pipe  (probably 5" or so) and was able to use a 6' or 7" bolt to pass thru and secure the bracket (now that the compressor is gone).   You'll see what I mean when the compressor is removed.  

Or get the brackets from a non A/C car.

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Perhaps there are dropped valve seats. I have seen these from the cracks between the valve expanding too much. The one i had seen came from a running engine with a blown head gasket. IF the heads are trashed, you can still use the block and replace the heads. I would only not use the block if it has been excessively overheated, such as melted timing belt covers.

The compression figures that you typed in your other thread (0-35psi on 3cyls, IIRC) are unlikely to be due to block/lower-end issues... unless there is a whole in your pistons.  Probably valves hanging open or rockers fallen loose.  Pull the heads and have a look-see.

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Well after procrastinating for a week or so I finally tore the motor down to the point where its just the block with crank and pistons. First thing I did after taking all the accessories and intake off was remove valve covers and 3 outta 4 (sound familiar?) of the intake lifters were just chilling in there not doing a damn thing so they deflated and that was my problem.. million dollar question though is why??? Cylinders are still cross hatched and everything else seemed in good shape. Not sure why I put this off for so long it was incredibly simple.

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Why because the oil pump has been pumping airated oil into them fixed this yesterday on a 90 loyale changed the browm oil pump shaft seal pump housing o ring and pump to block o ring and the ticking stoped after 10 min of runing that car has been ticking for 8 years not any more

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must come from subaru dealer the shaft seal is the most critical must be brown viton seal get all 3 from dealer cam seals crank seal ect can be aftermarket but oil pump seals dealer only also you can buy the oil pump gears seporate of the pump from subaru i recomend to chage them to

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