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RAD

Water/coolant going into carburetor from somewhere ?!?

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I have been marooned for months now, living by my wits, doing evertything to save my Subaru Brat and my practical life.
I have now succeeded in getting carb rebuilt, replacing water pump & almost a dozen gaskets, and other parts/ewprk/etc.

Same problem persists.|
Some months ago mechanic rebuilt carb, used two carb gaskets instead of one, after that water was spewing into carb, blew out whole water/coolant stystem, caused all kinds of problems.
It has been HELL, and any other engine, I could not have got this far. Got it barely/technically running, was able to come into town, gtet supplies and to use wifi and post this.
Not sure when I willo be able to c heck this post/thread/etc again, maybe tomorrow or soon, depending on all too many things.

How is water still going into my carburetor?!?
How can I stop it?
Engine runs, very hard to start, for potentially obvious reasons.
 

I suspect something wrong where the intakje manifold is concerned.
There is a small coolant hose, about the size of a fuel line in diameter, going from one part of the manifold to another ver near each other near the distributor.
Could that be it? Can I plug them up without causing serious danger or problems for engine?

I have to stop this water from coming into my carb!!!

Help ?!?!?

 

 

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Plug em, plug em!! Best solution for now, till you can find the problem. It's only there to prevent icing in cold temps... you shouldn't have to worry about that too much! But when you have a chance, look at the base gasket and intake where the carb attaches. that is where the water is getting in because of incorrect gasket or corroded manifold. Plug the hoses on both ends though, so you don't end up with a big vacuum leak.

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There is a coolant passage under the carb. If the gasket fails, or the manifold gets corroded enough, it leaks coolant into the intake.

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There is a coolant passage under the carb. If the gasket fails, or the manifold gets corroded enough, it leaks coolant into the intake.

 

Ok, not sure of this passage/gasket "under the carb" - If you are referring to the main Carb gasket, it was replaced with a new one, and I saw no significant corrosion or similar problem.

If you are referring to something else, please expand on identifying/explaining?

 

I tried to find some picture or illustration of the water passages with the intake manifold. Is therer such? Like if someone cut one in half lengthwise and took a picture of it? Any such or similar illustration?

How ese can I plug or bypass any water in or through the intake manifold or carburator/area ???

 

Thank you.

Edited by RAD

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Where is water coming from?

 

Answer: 

It's already in your fuel tank.  

Your tank is pumping fuel and water into your carb.

Get the yellow bottle of HEET which is methanol. It will dry out your fuel tank and prevent water from going into the bowl in the carb.

get the red bottle of HEET and it's 100% isopropyl alcohol  and will remove EVEN more water from the lines.

 

You usually only use one bottle or the other and it safe for your car.

 

You learn this when making biodiesel. water in bioD is bad.

 

iso-HEET link: https://www.goldeagle.com/product/iso-heet-fuel-line-antifreeze-injector-cleaner

HEET: link https://www.goldeagle.com/product/heet-gas-line-antifreeze-water-remover

 

Tip:

* Find stations that have ethanol in the fuel mix and will help absorb the water. ethanol and methanol have similar properties

* Keep your fuel tank full so there is no air to deliver moisture

* don't give up.

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The intake manifold has a main cooling system passage in it.  The coolant exits the heads into it, on the way to the thermostat.  It is necessary.  The small line, is the tap to help prevent carb icing.   When the carb was off, there should be the big air passage, and a smaller coolant pocket visible.

 

Pretty much has to be the gasket, or a crack in the manifold.  Maybe not tight or some odd thing?

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DaveT is correct. Been TOO long since I've worked on Ea81's. The coolant passage through the intake will still push coolant through wherever the leak is. Doesn't matter if you plug the lines or not, not like an EA71, which had a separate water crossover. I once replaced head gaskets on one when it was just the carb gasket leaking...  :rolleyes:

Edited by Subaru Scott
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Did you see it leaking in under the carb? If you didn't see any corrosion on the intake where the carb mounts and you've got the right gasket, I'd say you could have a leaking intake manifold gasket on one or both sides of the intake.

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I had some fluid going into the valve cover gasket and getting sucked up into the breather through the air recirculation hose. Mine is a head gasket that needs replaced. If you take off the valve covers do you see anything in them?

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I had a piece of high temp high pressure hydrolic line to replace the stock formed water bypass hose behind the distributor, which I had going in a half circle around the front of the distributor. I cut a couple pieces, found perfect bolts to tightly plug them, and used hose gaskets to make sure they would not leak or blow. Seems to have worked, not seeing water in carb. Yesterday when I killed the motor there was water gurgling in the carb and leaking out through the 'axel' of the throttle assembly. None of that today. Now my temp gauge is possibly not working as no reading, but connector is in place, and after driving driving about 7 miles, 3-4 of it up a grade, I checked radiator cap and very little pressure let off, but I'm at a bit for a second, so I know the system was water tight.

 

r

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From my past experience - I would change out that hydraulic hose for coolant / heater hose sooner rather than later.  Been there done that, had the failure.

 

Not specifically with hydraulic house, but the compounds are formulated for the intended use - coolant, fuel, oil, temperature, etc.  No guarantee that using any particular hose with a different fluid is going to survive. 

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