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Hello, I have a 1999 subaru impreza brighton wagon with a 2.2 ej engine. I have a few questions about it though. 1, I was looking around my engine bay but i could not find a oil cooler. Does the 99 impreza even have a oil cooler? 2, I was also wonder if you could install a turbo kit on it. Ive seen a bunch of kits on ebay for it but i havent really seen anyone do it, Is it even possible?

Thanks

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there's no really practical way to turbo that car. Best approach would probably be a swap from a wrx but, still, a major project.

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No one does it for a reason. Do an engine swap or get a different car. Slapping a turbo on high compression engines is rife with issues.  

Swap in an EJ25 block and bolt your 2.2 heads to it.  That’s the ticket.  Super easy, no custom work, no wiring, no fueling, no extra work at all.  Bolt in and go.

They can take low boost if done right but it’s too much work for too little gain and you’ll want more anyway or blow the engine(s).

Also - if you’ve got the money and skills to fabricate custom exhaust, intake, oil and cooling, fuel control...you have more than enough resources to do an engine swap with better results. 

Buy a cheap 01-04 EZ30 with rust , wrecked, or blown trans and you’ve got 215 hp.  Turbo swaps can be done for more $ and work. 

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GD is right.

It can be done, but it's not simple. There is no "kit". It will require a lot of custom parts, and a lot of work (yes, I've done it).

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There haven't really been "turbo kits" for Subarus in the U.S. since the WRX came out, for obvious reasons.  OEM just does it better...  Buy a WRX/STI, swap a factory turbo engine/trans/suspension/brakes under your own car, but good luck even finding a turbo kit these days.

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if you want a turbo car, buy a turbo car. Don't try to make the one you have into something it isn't, and was never intended to be.

Edited by heartless

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There is the AVO kit, which is specific for the NA/Non-turbo Subaru and is your best OTC (over the counter) fix for an addiction to speed.

 

Go read up on RS25.com, as that'll be your new home for turbo info....also look on NASIOC.com.

READ  before posting on either of those as your questions will be answered....by reading what others have already done.

And, no oil cooler on the '99 2.2. On Subarus it's usually (always?) part of the oil filter housing.

 

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cheaper to swap the internals from a WRX or something, cheaper still to just get a WRX :\

LegacyGT forums has a killer write up on which engines can turbo, whichs ones can but shouldnt, as well as every hybrid combination of EJ Heads and Blocks that are good for turbo, or a cheaper alternative to turbo... Id really check it out tbh before you even think about adding a turbo or anything performance based to the engine really.

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i hope you guys dont mind, but i will be linking the relevant info from LegacyGT. Its a lot of info, but id bookmark it or copy it, a lot of it... And even though most of it info for legacy, its going pretty much pertain to you as well, maybe with some slightly different year ranges or whatever. But still, this information will pertain to you just the same as you basically drive a shortened Legacy Brighton Wagon.
Enjoy, Read, Reread, dont just throw a damn turbo in your car and call it done.


General Turbo FAQ: https://legacygt.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3506948&postcount=2

The main thing to take from this link is this...

Quote

Why can't I turbo charge my car?

I can go on for days explaining this. However I'll try to keep it short and to the point. The EJ25D is an open deck engine. It is NOT a strong engine and does not handle boost well. There have been people who have been able to run about 4 - 5psi on them though. This is typical for a TD04 turbo, and to be honest isn't enough power for the money you will spend doing it. You also run into other problems like weak internals and compression ratio. The EJ22E is a little bit of a stronger engine and can handle about 10psi, however the money thing comes into play here as well. You can do a swap for just a little more then it will cost you to boost your EJ22E and have considerably more power.

2nd Gen Legacy Engines(Which you are also using):https://legacygt.com/forums/showthread.php/second-generation-usdm-legacy-engines-219372.html... however buried a couple post down in the second link is anothing thing i thought was really interesting and had a nice attention to detail despite being a general overview, 

Quote

By DOHCEJ22E1 @ LegacyGT forums

I've noticed that there are many questions regarding hybrid engines & while I'm not going to go into full detail, I am going to explain the hybrids that I know will work with the stock ECUs that we have here in the United States. If anyone has more info on their hybrid builds, please feel free to chime in. 

Also, the use of different size/thickness head gaskets will determine the end ratio. I'm just explaining the different types of hybrids on stock head gaskets & head gaskets MUST AT ALL TIMES match the bore of the block. If you have an EJ22 block, the head gasket with an EJ22 bore must be used & so on. You may also have to obtain special gaskets specifically designed to mate differing heads & blocks. 

Dual Overhead Cam EJ22 (EJ22D):
Done by installing EJ25D heads on an EJ22 (E or T). 
There is no need to change sensors on the heads of the block since they are the same. 
This fusion has lowered compression (E's have 9:1 while Ts have 7.5:1) from it's original SOHC variant & is better for turbocharging, since it has pretty deep chambers combined with dished pistons, or you can increase the compression by using thinner head gaskets (0.8mm is the thinnest anyone can and should go when using ANY Phase 1 EJ22 bottom end).

The DOHC 22Es can be used as they produce a little more midrange power than the SOHC 22Es but the 22Ts should not EVER be used without turbocharging. 
The best DOHC heads to use are the 97-99 heads as the chamber is enclosed in the bore of the EJ22's cylinders while the 96 25D chambers are cut to the bore of the 25D & should not be used on any EJ22 block.
This engine can be safely run on 87 octane.
The EJ22T and EJ221/2/3 head gaskets can be used to successfully mate DOHC EJ20/EJ25D heads to any EJ22 block. 

Single Overhead Cam EJ25D (EJ25E):
This is any 25D block w/EJ22 heads on it (the EJ22 heads have small chambers, which contributes to the high compression).
Again, no need to change sensors.
However, the compression ratio increases tremendously (approaching 11:1), which necessitates 91+ octane be used at all times to keep detonation away.
There are reports of this fusion produces 180+bhp & nice tow-end tq.
This would probably be an engine good for rock climbing, mudding, rallying, & "dirty" situations.
The 97-99 25D block provides a lower compression than the 96 block, which has flat top pistons designed for max compression.
Using a 96 25D block may cause some issues with compression being TOO high & require more depth of control.

High Compression DOHC EJ25D (EJ25D:HC):
This is made by installing 97-99 25D heads on a 96 25D block.
Compression is about the same as the SOHC 25D variant & it must be run on 91+ octane also.
The powerband is pretty much an exaggerated version of the 97-99 EJ25D. 
This hybrid can run on the stock ECU. 

Low Compression DOHC EJ25D (EJ25D:LC):
This is made by installing 96 25D heads on a 97-99 25D block.
Compression is lowered to about 8.8:1/9:1 & makes this engine good for turbocharging but on the flipside, the heads do not allow very high revs. 
Power produced is less that of a 96 25D.
This engine can run safely on 87 octane & on the stock ECU, and it is also a "turbo-ready" fusion.

All EJ22's have 52mm rod journals & all EJ25D's have 48mm rod journals.
All EJ22's have 75mm strokes and all EJ25's have 79mm strokes. 
Hope this helps anyone who wants to have general info on EJ hybrids.
I only have pictures of my DOHC EJ22E hybrid but I have seen the hybrids I have mentioned (haven't seen a 96 25D SOHC yet) & they all seem to work well but the SOHC 25Ds grant the most power & low-end tq out of all the builds & are easier to maintain, since they have the simplicity of the SOHC design. 

Hope this helps anyone who wants to have general info on EJ hybrids.

In short, its going to be a lot of work, a lot of time, and a lot of money to do it right, and its not worth it to do with the NA EJs... a cheaper alternative, thats much easier to do, and to do right, its consider swapping the heads on your ej22 with heads from a ej20, youll get more compression, and itll be more bang for the buck by a significant margin.

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