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Found 27 results

  1. I'm looking to upgrade my 2007 Outback with a little stiffer suspension since I often haul a lot of equipment or tools in the back of the car. I believe I read somewhere a long time ago that one could install the struts and springs from a 2000 - 2004 Outback into these newer Subaru's to beef up the suspension a little. Does anyone have info on this conversion or anything that would help me get a stronger set-up on the rear suspension?
  2. Is there a formula to use for a 3” lift when i extend the strut bottom to drill the bottom hole to maintain the stock camber the picture is for a buick the bottom hole is new the top two are stock and are inline with each other it looks like the bottom one is drilled at a offset any help would be great.
  3. Hi Folks!, Any one got a line on where to get new front struts for my 1980DL? All the usual suppliers (RockAuto, Summit Racing, AutoZone, Napa & O'Reilly's) have only rear shocks. Thanks in advance for your help!
  4. I thought this dead horse could use a little more beating. I would like to lift my 96 Legacy Outback. With the intention of putting on larger tires, as you do. Currently my 205 70 15 tires are about a 1/4" from the rear strut spring perch. (i think that's what it's called). Which year struts should I use for the front and rear? Would a small wheel spacer help? I figure if those can get me a couple more inches i may get some 235 70 15 under it. Thanks!
  5. Hi y'all, I've done a lot of searching on this subject, and I was led to believe Forester struts are a direct swap onto a 98 Legacy (non-Outback), to give a little lift. I bought a set of FCS complete strut assemblies (for an 05 Forester) and brought them to a local shop for install on my 98 Legacy. They say they will not bolt on. What am I missing? Did I get the wrong year Forester struts, or do I need to swap out top hats or something? Maybe I should've just gone with '98 Outback struts/springs? Thanks so much for the help! :)
  6. The attached photo is from How to Keep Your Subaru Alive. I installed my Gen1 Brat (no power steering) struts as per top picture. With the top of the shock in the rearward position. Based on the fact it's 4WD; and not a Sedan or Hatchback. Is this correct? And if it correct, has anyone experimented with fitting them the other way round. I have some ideas of what I think this would achieve but rather than describe them (because I could be wrong) I thought I would see what other peoples thoughts are on this.
  7. I was wondering if there are any suspension upgrades that can easily be done for hauling more weight and handling large pot holes better? I am moving 1500 miles away and all I can bring it what will fit on a small tailer and in the car. I am looking to run about 1000-1200# total trailer weight. I have installed a hitch and tailer harness. Are their any rear suspension upgrades to help handle the tongue weight (will keep it between 100-150#) plus about 300# of clothes and tools that will be in the car?
  8. Hi Starting this project thread to show my progress in making my Legacy -94/95 more suitable for the winter forest roads. This will be a long time project that starts with fixing the breaks. I hope I will be up and runing with this project later this week. /slugg
  9. Suspension Improvements For the third Gen Subaru Leone (also known as: DL, GL, GL-10, RX, RS, GT, GTi, ST, Omega, Winner, Loyale Royale, Vortex and even as Isuzu Gemminett II, depending on the Market, but here will be referred to, as the "EA82" for easy reference.) However, since the Second Gen Subaru Leone (EA81 / Brat) uses the same diameter and tall coil springs on the Front, being different on their spring rate and load rates only; you can use the third gen Leone's (EA82) coil springs on the second gen Leones (EA81), also you can use the Alternative coil springs from another automotive makes, which I mention here, on the second gen Leones, but their suspension could get way too stiff and might need a small cut off on the coil spring's wire, to work. Remember: going too weak or too stiff on the suspension on any car, could make you loose control of it, mainly on irregular terrains, so this could be Dangerous if you don't know what you're doing. Disclaimer: Use this information, and All the information I post, at your own Risk! Introduction: Please note that this writeup is intended to give you ideas to make stronger the Suspension, intended for rude use / offroad \ heavy loads; it gains a Sporty feeling, but the suspension could become harder, Stiffer. The modifications written here, has been tested with great results on the third gen Leone (EA82) Wagon only. My dad purchased this 1985 Subaru Wagon EA82 new that year; I've done regular maintenance and lots of repairs on it since then; when this subie became mine, I did many modifications and named it: the "BumbleBeast" I've Been part of this Great Club since year 2001 and I've Learned a Lot (mainly here, in this Awesome Website) about how to fix and improve many Things, but I personally have Discovered by myself, many other things about those older subie Models, things which I've Shared here with you, like the following suspension ideas... Let's begin! In this Writeup: ► Shock Absorbers and Coil Springs. ► Alternative ones from non-Subaru cars. ► Their part numbers. ► Photos. First Part: modifying the Suspension with other cars' Parts: About The REAR Suspension: In my own humble opinion, the subaru's weakest suspension part is the Rear shock absorbers; no matter how careful I drive, if I hit a pothole with some Load on the car, is almost sure that a Rear shock absorber will say Good Bye... Those are somehow, the "Achilles Heel" of the Subie: The trail arms, of the front wheel drive (2WD) Subarus, have a different mounting point (perch) for the Shock Absorbers than their four wheel drive (AWD) counterparts, as you can see in the following photos: The 2WD ones mounts the shock absorbers in the position where normally goes the constant velocity joint (Axle)... ...while 4WD ones have the said mounting point, raised, two inches higher on their trail arms, to let the axle pass. So, Subaru made two different Rear Shock Absorbers for the EA82: The Front wheel drive (2WD) Models' Shock Absorbers, has the base plate for the coil spring, welded to their bodies, two inches (2") Higher than the four wheel drive (AWD) ones, to compensate the lower mounting point (perch) on the trail arm; and both models use Same Coil Spring. 2WD .Vs. 4WD ► Using a 2WD shock absorber, on a 4WD subie, will lift the rear, due to the Higher position of the Coil spring's base. Then Subaru Suddenly changed the Production of those two, for one "Universal" Rear Shock absorber, which featured Adjustable Base for the Coil Springs, so you can place said base Up or Down (2" of Difference) and also included a "Middle" (1") Position; Despite the Coil Spring's Base position, the Total damper travel of those "Universal" Subaru Rear Shock absorbers, is 160 mm / 6.3" inches. Here is a Photo of said "Universal" Rear Shock Absorber, with Part Number and KYB equivalence: The Subaru Part Number for the Spring Coil's Base (seat) is: 21025GA230 But those Rear Shock Absorbers are Still Weak to handle our Horrid Roads, plenty of Potholes -and even Potholes inside the Potholes- with my Loaded Subaru "BumbleBeast", especially during my Usual offroad Weekend Mountain Travels; and I wanted my Subie to be Taller without a Lift kit in the Rear. Chapter 1: How to Improve the Rear Suspension: First I Needed Stronger Coil Springs for the Rear of my Wagon, because Usually I Travel with it Fully Loaded and many people in our very Bad Roads; also I do many Weekend "Mountain Adventure" Family Travels offroading; so, let me explain my own Method for searching and finding suitable replacements: I took off one of the Old Rear coil springs in order to take measurements of it with my vernier scale (Caliper Tool known here as "Pie de Rey" = King's Foot), and then I carried it as a Sample for comparison purposes, to the local Junk Yards; then I searched, and searched for suitable replacements, among piles of coil springs and strut assemblies, found on many different local Junk Yards, called here "Yonkers" as you can see in the following photo: Honduran “Yonkers” are different from the regular “PaP” (pull a Part) or any other USA version of a Junk Yard; they receive the cars and disassemble everything; sending the unuseful things such like crashed metallic bodies and cracked plastics to the Recyclers; and then they classifies everything in “Areas” so, you can find in a Latin American “Yónker”, one area dedicated solely to Doors, other area dedicated to Engines, other areas for Starters, Alternators, Seats, Headlamps, Struts, Mirrors, Transmissions, etc, etc, etc, let me share with you a photo of a typical Latin American “Yonker” (Junk Yard): I went there carrying my Vernier Scale and made annotations of the Measurements found on the Coil Springs that could be suitable replacements; then I came home, contrasted those measurements and researched online further information regarding those coil springs that I found to be as possible candidates; because they don't only need to have similar size and shapes; they must be of similar capabilities. The variables that I compare, are their Measurements, Spring Rates, Load Rates and Wire Diameters, to find the perfect ones for the application. I wanted taller coil springs with similar diameter and shape, but with increased load rate / spring rate, under certain margin, because you can not go too stiff nor too soft on them, otherwise the stability and safety of the car would get compromised. So after many search and research, I found that the Subie's Rear Coil Springs are almost the Same Size, Tall and Wide than the Honda Accord's Front Coil Springs (1986 ~ 1989) but the Honda ones have Thicker wire and it has Two More Turns than the Subie ones; so I Swapped the Rear Subaru Coil Springs with the Honda Front ones; it Makes the Subie More Capable to Manage the extra Weight when is Loaded, without going too low; also the Honda's Coil Springs does Lift the Subaru's Rear in two inches (2") and its Movement & Handling while Driving in Unpavemented Roads / Pot Holes, becomes Firmer and Sportier. So they gets rid from the Bouncing and Saggy Butt. The Front Honda's Coil Springs that Fits on the Subaru's Rear, came from the 1986 ~ 1989 Honda Accord, (The Prelude from that Era has them too) it could come either from the Manual or Automatic, With or Without A/C, but Keep in mind that the Hondas with manual trans and without AC, does have weaker Coil Springs than the Hondas with Auto Trans and A/C, so I chose the Stiffer ones. The Part Number for the Honda's Coil Springs, is: ~► MOOG CC248 for "Moog" Brand. ~► NCP 2775298 for "Napa" Brand. So, How to get Rid of those weak Rear Shock Absorbers? My Subie was in dire need of Stronger Rear Shock Absorbers, so after Searchin' and Researchin' a Lot using "my own method" that I explained above, I Found This permanent and simple Solution: To Swap the Toyota 4Runner's Front Shock Absorbers in the Place of the Subaru's Rear ones! (Despite that this two photos says: "Subaru 4WD" the shock absorber shown on them, are "Subaru 2WD" the ones with taller spring perch. Sorry, that was an involuntary mistake while editing the photos on a hard day's late night...) As you can See in these Photos, the Toyota ones has the Same extended Tallness than the Subaru Ones; Also the Toyota ones has the Same Wide Base for the Coil Spring and they use almost the Same Design; But the Toyota Ones are Thicker and Heavier, have a thicker bar, they're more Capable to manage the Stress of Riding in my Crazy Country Roads, especially for offroading with a Fully Loaded Subaru Wagon. (Subaru 2WD shock absorbers shown on this photo) The Subie Ones had their Threaded top of Nº 10 mm and the Hole opening on their Base is for a Nº 10 mm Screw; While the 4Runner ones has them Nº 12 mm Screws; So the Subie's Nut on the Base for Nº 10 mm Screw had to be Removed in order to Use a Pass-Thru Nº 12 mm Screw with its own Nut and locking washer. The Subie's Part for the Shock Absorber's Top shall be Modified too, in order to Accept the Nº 12 mm Screw Size instead the Older Nº 10 mm One, I Just made the Hole Larger; pretty easy! For Those who want the 4Runner's Shock Absorber Part Number, it is: ~► KYB 341232 in KYB (Kayaba) Japanese Brand The salesman from the Aftermarket parts store where I purchased those KYB 341232 Shock absorbers, said that those are for the Front of a Toyota 4Runner for the 1998 model year; However, Toyota used the same platform and shared these shock absorbers in the Hi-Lux Surf, and the Land Cruiser Prado / Colorado (J90) Which is a very Popular car here, in LADM (Latin American Domestic Market). The Following is a Screen Caption of a website that I Saved long time ago, where you can find the Original Toyota's Part Numbers for their OEM Shock Absorbers... According to online databases, it does interchange with: ~► Monroe D8344 ~► Sachs 230631 ~► BOGE 27-D67-A I Tested the KYB 341232 only, any other Toyota Shock Absorber could be "Visually" Identical, but might have some differences, such like even shorter travel, Harder ride, Thicker Body, etc ... So I Kindly suggest you to Stick to the KYB Part Number I Provided, I can not guarantee to work the other ones... My Subaru "BumbleBeast" Runs very well with that Setup: Toyota Shock Absorbers + Honda Coil Springs in the Rear, since many, many years ago... ...despite that they has only 4.3" of total damper Travel. (as I wrote above, the Subaru rear Shock Absorbers has 6.3") But that shorter travel is not an issue, because the Coil Springs won't let it go down more than 4" under compression, and the total expanded -extended- lenght is Equal to the Subaru's ones, as you can see in the photos above. In case you need to do a Rear Alignment on these Subaru Models, here is the Factory Guide about how to do that: ► IMPORTANT NOTE: You can use the 4Runner's shocks along with the subaru coil springs, to keep the original height of the suspension. If you use the Honda coil springs, the rear suspension will be lifted two inches (2"), stressing the angle of the rear axles in 4WD (AWD) models only. (You might drop the rear differential a little to compensate the lift) The 2WD (FWD) models doesn't have any problem with that configuration. ► LEVELING ISSUE: Since Those front Honda Coil Springs does Lift the Subaru's Rear two inches (2"); after that Swap, I had to Lift the front of my "BumbleBeast" an equal amount to compensate, using lift blocks, as you can read the complete information and see many photos about that, ~► Here, but also, below you'll see a photo of said lift blocks already installed. About The FRONT Suspension: The 4WD (AWD) Shock Absorbers has a 5.75" / 147 mm in Total damper travel, While 2WD (FWD) Shock Absorbers has a 6.12" / 155 mm in Total damper travel. Since I couldn't find any 2WD (FWD) Shock absorbers locally, I installed into my "BumbleBeast", new Monroe Front Shock Absorbers for the XT; this are their part Numbers: Passenger Side: ~► 71876 .................Driver Side: ~► 71877 Chapter 2: How to Improve the Front Suspension: Next, I wanted to install Firmer Coil Springs for the Front of my Subaru, as I already did on the Rear, to have equal balance of handling and sportier feeling (Harder / sportier Suspension). Initially, I searched for stiffer Coil Springs for the Front of this models of Subaru, on year 1999; Because my 2.7 Wagon (now dead) Project, had the Heavyweighed ER27 engine, plus a Fiberglass & Metal sheet Reinforced Front Bumper; I Needed Something Stronger than the EA82's coil Springs to better carry that extra weight. So, using "my own method" which I described with details above; I Found that a suitable replacement are the front coil springs from a Ford Tempo; which looked pretty similar to the Subaru ones, but having around two more Turns and a thicker wire. I found those Tempo Coil springs on year 1999, already taken outside their car; (they only had a Mark done with white paint marker on them, that said: '94 Tempo) and originally I used them on my Loyale 2.7 wagon project; but since it is dead (More info, ~► Here) I decided to remove certain parts from it to make my EA82 Weberized Wagon (Now renamed as the BumbleBeast) a Better car, with the Better parts from the two; including the front Tempo coil Springs. So, I installed those Tempo's Coil Springs on the front of my "BumbleBeast" and those add to the Front Suspension the Same Firm & Sporty Feeling that the Rear suspension obtained with the Above written Modifications. ► IMPORTANT NOTE: The Ford Tempo Coil Spring's total radius -diameter- is Half inch (½") smaller than the Subaru ones, but that is Not a problem, I Drive my Subaru "BumbleBeast" with them since Years ago and they doesn't "Shift" nor make any clunk noise. Somehow these front coil springs from the Ford Tempo, aids to keep the Camber / alignment within specs; other coil springs that has been tested on the front of these Subarus, makes the camber to be even Worse... Further information on the subject, photos and even a Video can be found, ~► Here. (thank you Bryan Dudas / Subaru Adventures \ Anderson Design and Fabrication, for your kind words) According to the info I obtained back then from the Junk Yard's salesman, the Front coil Springs came off a basic 1990's "Second Gen" Ford Tempo with in-line 4 Cylinder engine and manual transmission; Those are "Non-Progressive" Coils, so they measure the Same between each turn. I searched on internet for The Part Number for those Ford Tempo Front Coil Springs, So those should be: ~► MOOG CC854 for "Moog" Brand. ~► NCP 2775375 for "Napa" Brand. These are the Lift Blocks I had to use in the Front, to compensate the Rear Lift, as I explained in the "Leveling issue" note, written above: ► IMPORTANT NOTE: The Ford Tempo Coil Springs I used, came out from a used 4 cylinder Tempo, so they were used and not as Stiff as brand New coil Springs, so I didn't had any fitment problems nor had to trim them; but People who has brought those Coil Springs brand new, had to Trim them up to 1.5 Turns, especially the Moog CC856 because those are "Progressive" which means that they has different spaces between coils and they're intended for heavier V6 Automatic Tempos, and are even Stiffer than the Moog CC854 I Used, so I don't recommend to use those uncut, they might be too stiff for the Subaru. Also, I found that the Front Coil Springs from the Kia Sephia (first and second generation), are almost identical to the front coil springs on the Subaru Loyale; but the Kia Sephia ones have a thicker wire (around 2 mm) and the Sephia ones have a slightly bigger total radius, but they fit on the Subaru's shock absorbers; and the Sephia ones have an increased load capabilities. Let me Show you: They're almost identical, here are the Sephia's ones, Load Capabilities: Even the first gen Sephia, has an increased load ratio than the second gen Sephia. The ideas in this writeup are for those who are interested in Improving the Suspension of their Subies (Specially for Off-Roading), let me Tell you again that this Mods are intended for a More Rude Use and Longer Lasting Parts; not for Confort; so be adviced that the Ride will become Harder, with the stiffer suspension. Despite that, I use my lifted Subaru "BumbleBeast" as daily driver on city roads & Highways during weekdays (60% usage) and offroading on Weekends (40% usage) on our usual "Mountain Adventure" travels with my Family + Luggage, toys, food, etc... ...to Drive my Modified Subie with those 4Runner Shock Absorbers + Accord's Coil Springs in the Rear, and the Subaru XT Shock Absorbers + the Tempo's Coil Springs in the Front, Changes the Handling & Feeling of the Subie in the same way you'll notice while Driving a Police Car after being Driving the Civil Version of it before. I've Test Drove it Unloaded and Loaded, up to 160 KPH (100 MPH) in Highways... ...Bad Pavemented Roads and gravel off roads... ...and it Feels Really AWESOME! ... ... but rides Pretty Hard to be a "Family Wagon" anymore. Please see further details on the Second Part of this Writeup, below!
  10. having serious regrets about messing around w/ my Loyale, "Joan Crawlins" after i finally had her in the best shape she's been in since i got her last Winter in Penn. everything was great as stock, but then i put in a 2" inch lift to gain clearance over sand in btwn the tracks on a rutted out access road to the beach. that messed up the camber of the front wheels something awful (pics here: http://s406.photobucket.com/user/GlenSzabo/library/2%20inch%20Lift%20kit%20and%2015%20inch%20Pugs) and after tracking down some 15" alloy pugs in a junkyard in Pennsylvania and ordering lugs from Dan in Sacramento, i thought that would help the camber issue, but it didn't solve nearly enough for daily driving. so pulled the lift kit out, but kept the pugs on and had to cut a bunch of the wells out cause i was getting lots of rubbing since my suspension was in bad shape. put in new struts in the front which helped, gonna put in struts in the back in the next couple days, but having no luck finding coils for the front. CAN I USE COILS FOR ANOTHER SUBARU that are easily available? like a legacy? if so, what should i get? also, now my camber is ok in the front, i'm getting positive camber in the back, which i can only guess was as a result of putting in and taking out the lift in the back. once i put in new struts in the back and hopefully coils in the front, and then get everything aligned professionally, will my camber issues be solved, theoretically? just ruing my decision to have changed anything at this point, but all's not lost by along shot and if i can get the suspension finished and the alignment solves the camber, i'll be happy to have the Pugs on rather than the stock 13"s. here's a look at where i'm at now: http://s406.photobucket.com/user/GlenSzabo/library/Loyale%20Camber%20Issues @175eya @CoyotePaws @Mechanical_Misfit thanks for the help folks, as always, i'm eternally grateful for the advice and support. -Glen
  11. Just picked up a beautiful 79 brat, but I'm wanting to replace the struts. I've poked around a little but can't seem to find any part numbers. Anyone have any recommendations? Has anyone used the KYB GR-2/EXCEL-G SHOCK ABSORBER?
  12. I'm upgrading the suspension on my 92 Loyale wagon that is getting lifted 2". I am thinking of going with King Springs and need new shocks as well. Lordco sells Moog and Monroe and I often hear about KYBs on here. What are the pros/cons and what would mate best with some Kings? I read up as much as possible and couldn't answer this question. Thanks.
  13. I done some digging in the various forums but can't seem to find the answer. I have a 1990 Legacy wagon with only 140k on it. I've done the front struts but the parts store wants stupid prices for the rears. I've seen that I can swap top hats and use later model struts but i can't find exact information. If anyone has some for sale I'd be interested. I'm sure I need springs too. AFIK OEM is still in there from when my dad bought it new in 1990. You can also reply to mcopeland at pobox dot com Thanx, Mike
  14. Hey guys, just wanted to see if anyone had input or experience regarding this bearing/washer combo I came across whilst googling. I have a car with cheap coil sleeves installed on stock struts, and I'm doing a bit of troubleshooting. By the way, I am aware that that last sentence contains atrocious words(cheap coil sleeves, stock struts).. Words that only a young man with a microscopic budget would utter. Try to get past that before you bust the flamethrower out. SO, the car in question has a pretty bad case of "coil-bind" or "spring bind." That's not really a common term, so if you haven't heard of it, here's what I know: we're obviously talking about a macpherson strut setup here, so the strut and spring turn when the steering wheel turns. My springs get hung up somehow, if you get what I mean. There is tension in the steering wheel, particularly when stopped and turning the wheel. The tension builds and "pops," which is audible both inside and outside the car, and can be felt in the steering wheel. The "binding" doesn't just happen when stopped, so say you come to a stop and turn the car 90 degrees to the right. The springs don't want to rotate smoothly, and they make a little pop noise as you crank the wheel. The car now pulls to the right, as the spring doesn't want to rotate back to it's normal position after the turn is complete. They are square end springs, I feel as if the issue is pretty clear(in my head) and the base of the spring is just not rotating properly, particularly since it's under so much pressure. These roller thrust bearings I came across seem like they could be a solution. If not a complete fix, maybe they would "reduce the symptoms" a bit. Has anyone seen this in action on a car, or really anything in real life? I think the consensus will be that I should buy some and try it out, but I just wondered if any of you physics-inclined folks would have valuable input. I would appreciate it, and do flame on if you feel it is necessary. Here are two links that are relevant: Eibach Torsion Release Bearings TRB250 - Free Shipping on Orders Over $99 at Summit Racing QA1 Coil-Over Shock Thrust Bearing Kits 7888-109 - Free Shipping on Orders Over $99 at Summit Racing Thanks in advance, Subaru Gods.
  15. My question here is can you use kyb struts for stock replacement but use a shorter spring to get even just an inch lower? if so is there a spring I can get or would it be alright to just cut the stock springs? This is a 82' 4WD GL. also what about the back? I know I can adjust the torsion bar but idk where its sitting at the moment and if it will get low enough to match the front.
  16. I'm replacing the struts on the Brat, and the new ones look nothing like the old ones. I know this is a common issue with aftermarket parts, but these look so different I think I got the wrong ones. What do you think?
  17. Any one have any leads or a pair of XT6 front springs?? Im trying to put them under an 82 gl with new struts to get a little bit of drop and stiffer spring rate. This should work right?? Any help/tips are much appreciated! thanks all!
  18. Hello out there this is my first time on this board as I just acquired an '85 GL wagon and have heard from many that it could make a good off-roader. Wondering if you guys can give me ideas on ways to lift its clearance and good wheels and tires that can go off-road but also handle the highway without killing gas mileage and my wallet...
  19. Suspension on my '95 Legacy is pretty shot (well at the least the rear for sure) I keep hearing that Outback struts will bolt right up and lift the car about 1.5 to 2 inches. I think this is a great idea. But I feel like there is more to it? Do I need outback springs? spacers? anything like that. If anyone can give me any leads/video's/info on this swap. That'd be Great. thanks- travis
  20. http://www.partsgeek.com/gbproducts/WC/359-01049330.html?utm_content=YN&utm_term=1982-1987+Subaru+GL+Struts+KYB+W0133-1615015+Front+82-87+Subaru+Strut+Assembly+1985+1983&fp=pp&gbm=a&utm_source=google&utm_medium=ff&utm_campaign=PartsGeek+Google+Base&gclid=COzk5eWCxbwCFUiGfgod-xcA-w Will these work on my 82' 4WD Gl wagon? And has anybody done this? how much lower are they than the 4WD struts? and can i use the stock 4WD springs? thanks guys!
  21. Hey guys, new member here. I recently aquired a silver 87 GL-10 turbo wagon with air suspension and the 3 speed automatic. I essentially got the car for free so I figured if it ran, I'd spend some time and a little money trying to get it running good so I'll have a winter car. It sat for probably 2 years, at least, up in the woods of the northwest. Encouragingly the car started right up with a jump, and it actually drove over 180 miles down to where I live without any needed repairs. So far, the problems I’ve found with the car are limited to the push-button 4WD not engaging( which may be a bad button is all) and more importantly...the air suspension will not lift the car. When I turn the key to ON, the compressor starts running and continues to do so for about 8-10 minutes then shuts off. After it shuts off, the light begins to blink on the dash indicating that there is an error. I’ve found very little technical information on this system that I can effectively use to properly troubleshoot the problem. The little that I have found has informed me that the behavior I just described usually occurs when a leak is present in the system. Because the ride height does not change after 8-10 minutes of the compressor running, the computer assumes there is a leak so it shuts off and projects an error code to the driver. I also read somewhere( and I could have this wrong, please let me know) that the computer will always try to raise the rear of the car BEFORE the front. So, with this in mind I removed the plastic and carpet from the back of the car and checked the air lines for holes. I found out that mice had literally severed the air line going to the passenger-side rear wheel. I bought a couple air-line bridges(blanking out on what they’re actually called) and patched the line. As of right now that’s the only defect I can find in the air system. After fixing that though, the system still does the same thing. It runs for 10 minutes without any change in elevation, and then shuts off leaving me with nothing but a blinking dash again. What I’m hoping for is for someone who has had experience with these air systems to suggest some things to try. Or that possibly someone who has a technical shop manual for the 80’s GL’s could take a gander at the pages detailing air suspension troubleshooting and post some suggestions...maybe even some scans One observation that I’m not sure is important, is that my dad unhooked the middle hose from the compressor that goes to the tank. We noted that he was able to blow air INTO the compressor...which seems like something irregular. But I’m not sure. Maybe it needs a new diaphram? Help me out. Oh and before everyone starts chiming in saying that I should just tear out the air suspension.. I’m not going to put that much work into this car lol Plus, everything seems to be in good condition, the car has 150,000 miles. Thanks in advance guys.
  22. Hey Everyone. I have a '95 Legacy LS. I'm pretty sure it's about time to change the struts. I believe they are original parts on a legacy with 350k on it. I was thinking about putting some outback struts on it, hopefully giving it 1 to 1-1/2 inch lift. Just enough room for a slightly more aggressive tire. I'm not sure if I can just swap the struts out or do I need to swap other parts out in addition to make it all compatible. Thanks for any input you have Travis.
  23. 98 Leg. OB, It just turned over to 200,000mi. and had my 2.5 replaced w/ a 2.2, got 4 new tires and plan to replace exhaust, so I plan to get by on my old "muscle car" for another year or until I can buy a near new one. The back driver side strut was bad, so I replaced it. The passenger rear and front struts seem ok and don't sag or bounce. Since I got new tires, I plan to get a 4 wheel alignment soon $85. Q: Should I go ahead and buy a rear passenger side strut and install even if it seems OK? It took me a lot more time than most would take so I cringe at the thought of getting those bolts back into place, busten knuckles, praying I can finish what I started, etc. but will do it if I REALLY SHOULD. Otherwise, I'll get it aligned and put the $ toward a new exhaust system. This is my 3rd and I really love my OBs, (except for the 2.5 head gaskets and timing belts that kept failing). Hope the 2.2 solves that issue. Appreciate educated guesses from anyone who's been there done that, or at least sounds convincing.
  24. Hey Everyone. I have a '95 Legacy LS. I'm pretty sure it's about time to change the struts. I believe they are original parts on a legacy with 350k on it. I was thinking about putting some outback struts on it, hopefully giving it 1 to 1-1/2 inch lift. Just enough room for a slightly more aggressive tire. I'm not sure if I can just swap the struts out or do I need to swap other parts out in addition to make it all compatible. Thanks for any input you have Travis.
  25. fishy

    Tacticool Lifted Impreza

    Well I finally manned up and got my impreza lifted! I've got a set of MEATY 215/70/15 snow tires on it now. I have enough clearance around the rear to not need the outback link brackets so I'm going to save those for a car that might pass another inspection instead of this poor thing. I also think I'll run it without the rear swaybar because my family completely dominates my time and it was almost all I could do to get just the struts swapped. I painted the car with an HVLP gun and some slightly thinned hardware store rust paint. The colour didn't turn out quite as OD as it was supposed to but again I don't have time to re-do it all again so it's close enough. Here's a picture for everyone's enjoyment/mockery: Thanks to everyone around here for inspiring and educating me so I could tackle this myself!
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