Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/15/14 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    Thank you all you great guys out here on USMB - I couldn't have done it right with out you - probably would have messed it up. I wasn't ticking too bad, but now ZERO - and super quite overall! Also did water pump, hoses and seal on metal pipe that goes into pump. Sealed up some cracks in my air intake snorkel with RTV, fixed anything I found along the way and now it's super quite and smooth. No "bubbles and water fall" sounds coming out of coolant system. No scary stuff with the temperature almost going into danger before thermostat opens. Im pretty sure the last couple of days before the belt broke it had lost at least a tooth and jumped a tooth cause it was feeling out of balance when idling - that's the main reason I kind of why I thought it might be a waste doing this job - and I REALLY didn't want to tear it all the way down, I would have sold it or junked it. It really feels like I have a brand new rebuilt motor! To me it's amazing there is such a difference. AND NO OIL DRIPPING (yet) all over the bottom of the timing belts, which would spread into the exhaust pipe and start burning & smoking if on the freeway very long! It's almost like a dream... Thanks again
  2. 5 points
    OEM Subaru clutch and throttle cables.
  3. 5 points
    I see value in GDs comments. He had the Loyale/GL platform at one time and he decided to move away from it for the reasons he states. His reasons are valid. But they are equally valid reasons to not buy and maintain any old machine. With a car that ceased production in 1994 the lack of specific parts may be a good reason to stay away. But, as to the value, the market is the market. It seems like many of these are coming in under $1,000 but ones that are not rotten and seem to have been well maintained are going for higher prices. Some people are sticking with this GL/Loyale and keeping them running. I liked driving the one I did. My sense from talking with the owner was that he was able to find parts when he needed them or make due with substitutes. There are many aspects of the simplicity of the GL/Loyale that appeals to me. I do need to admit that I fly a 1946 Piper J-3. Low power, slow, uncomfortable, etc. Sometimes tricky to find parts for and maintain. Sometimes when flying about 1000 ft AGL I fly along a freeway so the movement of my shadow can be compared to the speed of the traffic. I need a tailwind to move faster then the cars. So why maintain and fly this plane? In the past I have owned a 59 MGA, a 64 Porsche, a 65 Beetle and a 64 Corvair and a 73 Austin Mini. I rode a Yamaha XS650. All quirky rides. My daily drive today is a Toyota. There are members on the forum who like the GL/Loyale and are driving and maintaining them.
  4. 5 points
    Tone ring... that's what that's called? Yes, the screws came threw the spindle into the ring. There is no way to rebuild it. It's too beat up. I'll be pulling the assembly from another car. I'll do a complete brake job on this before it's done. The car is going to a lady I know who lives on Social security, and has trouble walking. This ride will give independence and make doctor appointment much easier. So ya, good brakes equals piece of mind. As for the previous owner, I can't say anything bad. He's a nice guy overall. Just a bit clueless. While marijuana is legal in Washington, it doesn't mean everybody should partake.
  5. 5 points
    Have a look at these, boys! Still available from Subaru in tan.
  6. 5 points
    Old lug nut, fender washer, and some grease is the easiest DIY way. Or pull the hub off and hammer it in with a socket supporting the hub on the threaded side. GD
  7. 5 points
    I talked to the guy that I see all the time at the local burger joint who has a Subaru. Right off the bat he gave me the name of a guy who works on Subarus (who was also recommended by a local garage that has a good reputation). I found this man (he has a junkyard/body shop) and he has 4 Subs (that I saw) in various stages of repair at the moment. It was raining on us and I was on my way home from the vet with my cat, so I didn't talk to him long, but he sounds like Montana Tom upthread. He had a beautiful silver OB in the repair bay he's asking 3500 for right now - so assuming he can keep Subs in stock, I should be good to go once I have the money saved up. My neighbors had bought a fixed up non-Subaru from this guy and it's been a jewel of a car - I have to borrow it sometimes when my#$^*% truck tears up. I had been peeking at this guy's place when I would drive by, but I didn't see any Subies on his lot. Thank you all for the push to go up to people and ask...who knew I'd find someone this close by and so easily? Of course I will carefully check over any car he has for sale...but I have faith in the 'hillbilly grapevine" especially when it comes to the guys at the burger joint...I've been talking to them off and on for the last year or so; they strike me as the kind of fellas that would look out for a woman in need of help and not lie to me about stuff. If they say he's good, I believe them.
  8. 5 points
    So the clutch, flywheel and clutch cable were replaced after 32 years of great service. Replaced with OEM parts. Exedy clutch kit (Amazon) LUK flywheel (RockAuto) Subaru OEM clutch cable (Lithia Subaru of Oregon) I've had a Weber carb on it for years and now the clutch & shifting feel like when I drove it off the dealer's lot all those years ago. A few other things to attend to but nothing that affects how it runs.
  9. 4 points
    Hi all; Picked up an 01 limited 5 speed to flip this week. The seller claimed new head gaskets, new oe timing set , new factory thermostat. heads sent off to machine shop. All done in Jan 18. I was shown the bill. Car ran good until may then started overheating. Would run apx 25 miles before heating up. Putting pressure into the radiator just like a 25 D engine... having never come across a cyl. leaking head gasket on a 2.5 1 I went under the assumption that I would find a cracked head. Inspection of the spark plugs after bringing it home showed #1 plug water stained. While pulling the motor I saw that indeed a new timing set was on the car, not OE but not junk. The "new" thermostat had 1/4" holes drilled into it ,no doubt by the seller hoping to fix his heating up problem. My thought at that point was a low rent machine shop swapping out heads instead of rebuilding what was brought to them. Seller claimed he had the head gaskets done because they were oil dripping & he wanted to get another 100,00 out of his car... When removing the first head I could see that factory gaskets were not used ... after head was off, the problem was glaringly apparent, total crap quality head gasket !!! I have never seen a gasket deteriorate like this one had! In only 5 months ! No name left on the gasket if it ever had one. I pulled the other head and it would have been leaking any day! No proof but I have no doubt they were china gaskets.... The seller paid almost $1800 for this work, $200 alone for head gaskets and bolts! Moral of the story... Factory original parts ! If you can not do the work yourself... find a real Subaru shop. You usually get what you pay for... sometimes you get even less. He sold me the car for $800... costly little fix by a non subaru shop for him... nice clean car for me.
  10. 4 points
    Hey guys, I got my car back. Nothing but a bent up steering column and broken plastic cover. Radio is gone and some other little items. Glad to have it back in one piece.
  11. 4 points
    Skip NO steps. Regardless of bolt newness. Repeat each of the ft/lb torque sequences till they do not turn any further. If that takes three times or 50 times - once you run through the sequence and they no longer turn you can move on. Obviously this does not apply to the angle torque values. If you get creaking (stick-slip), STOP and take it apart. Yes chase the threads with an old bolt. And then you need to lube them with Amsoil Engine Assembly Lube. Lube the bolt threads of one bolt, run it in and out of each hole with the head off a couple times - relubing between each. Apply assembly lube LIBERALLY to each bolt and between the bolt head and top of the washer (not between the washer and the head). Make sure you use the small washer bolts in the corners and the big washer bolts in the center. You must use something like the Amsoil lube. Regular engine oil won't handle the load and will creak. Once you achieve ZERO creaking you are doing it right. Creaking means false torque readings and in all likelyhood insufficient clamping. My point was your machinist is a hack. I bought an Ra meter (used) for about $350. It's a neat little tool and a proper machine shop would own one (maybe several) in order to ensure they achieve proper specified surface roughness for any given application. This doesn't only apply to cylinder heads - lots of things need to have specific surface qualities. GD
  12. 4 points
    Yes it sounds like you are well equipped to deal with these then. I am mostly cautioning prospective buyers of "cheap" older Subaru's that these are a poor choice for someone looking for a first car, or a daily driver, etc. They are NOT that. I know it sounds silly, but the EA82 chassis is not the one you want if you want simplicity and frustration free. You want the EA81 chassis for that. Look for a really nice 82 to 84 GL wagon, or hatch. The EA81 is a much easier engine to work on than the EA82 and to some extent has more support. No timing belts and much easier to work on. Still going to be hard to find parts but if you have the money anything can be found or made. I still maintain and drive a lifted EA81 hatchback. Contrary to what people think around here - I don't hate them. I just see the reality of the situation and that reality is these are not for most people anymore. They are for collectors, folks with lots of parts, time, and money to maintain them. I have customer that pay me to work on their EA chassis cars and the bills are OUTRAGEOUS. Because no other shops have the knowledge or know where to the get the parts anymore. Trust me - I couldn't afford to pay myself to work on these cars. GD
  13. 4 points
    The clutch friction material was completely off the steel disk attached to the hub. It looked like a bird nest in the bottom of the trans.
  14. 4 points
    Thank you to all who replied and for supplying the solution, this not-well-known info about the "virgin" switch. It was switched by one of the crew at the car wash as they fussed to wipe the muck from the dashboard. Now that I know about this feature, I feel like I've been admitted to a secret society... no longer a virgin, so to speak
  15. 4 points
    So after a lot of work, mailing in a set of torsion bars from my Brat, paying for the initial machine work and engineering design, and a 8 week turn around, I happy to announce that you can now order new torsion bars for your EA81 chassis from Swayaway here in California. They will run $325 a set and will offer you a spring rate that's 20-25% stiffer than stock without loosing any of the rotational limits the stock ones had. Actually, Swayaway claims their bars will out perform the OEM bar in every single matrix, and they're guaranteed not to sag or break. You can check out their web site at www.swayawaycom. They make very high end products. So what does this mean: Better handling, no more having to crank the torsion bars for heavier loads, no more broken torsion bars, better articulation, and a new parts option for our aging suspension. I will be receiving my set this week and will do a comprehensive comparison to place here and on FB. Once I do that and ensure fit and finish is good, Ill update this post with the PN. He made 3 sets, 1 for me, 2 for immediate purchase, and any orders after those will be made to order.
  16. 4 points
    rotate crank to open intake on cyl 1, take out spark plug, attach compressor hose, blow the plastic backwards out the the way it went in?
  17. 4 points
    I’m guest east coast guy. see you all weekend.
  18. 4 points
    Mick's web site is still active: http://www.indysworld.com/vehicles/past/1982-wagon-mtngrizz/mountaingrizzly.html Need to level up on your google-fu. GD
  19. 4 points
    Well, I couldn't find an old ratty wheel to cannibalize for my aftermarket wheel adapter, so I just used mine. Made a plastic bushing to center the pilot bit, and holesawed away. Then flattened out the little bend on one edge with a BFH, and drilled and tapped for the new wheel. Best thing about this method (other than being cheap) is the horn and turn signal cancel cam work just like factory! I had this same style wheel back in high school in a 72 Opel GT that I stuffed a 1963, 215 CI. aluminum Oldsmobile V8 into, and always loved the wheel.
  20. 4 points
    I replaced the fuel pump, inlet screen, and filter and that appears to have been what the problem was. Thanks very much, everybody. Happy Trails!
  21. 4 points
    yep cam and crank sprockets were different swapped them over and it fired right up.
  22. 4 points
    Here's my 86 1/2 3-door turbo, my baby for the past 21 years, currently 242k miles.
  23. 3 points
    Camber adjustment, improved Ackermann angle (if you use EJ front knuckles), 100s of front strut/spring options (rear shocks don't change with the 5-lug, but are a pretty simple design so there are options there). dozens of brake options, front and rear. Wheel/tire options. Might not seem like much, but makes a huge difference. Of course, a better torque curve (EJ engine) and real AWD help a LOT, too.
  24. 3 points
    If I recall the specified head gasket for that MY is a 11044AA633 that is a Non-MLS gasket (bad choice) Normally aspirated MLS gasket for that MY is 11044AA642 Turbo charged engine MLS Gasket is 11044AA770 Many use the turbo gasket (770) instead of the 642 for normally aspirated (non turbo charged) engines.
  25. 3 points
×